Topic categories:

Unique Coventry words and phrases

You need to be signed in to respond to this topic

No actionNo action

Displaying 1 to 15 of 288 posts

Page 1 of 20

1 2 3 4 5 .... 10 .... 15 16 17 18 19 20
Next pageLast page
288 posts:
Order:    

DBC
Nottinghamshire
All posts by this member
1 of 288  Mon 5th Apr 2010 7:17pm  
Member: Joined Apr 2010  Total posts:170

I thought I might start a topic about dialect words which seem to be unique to Coventry. Most of these I learned from my grandmother who was born in Coventry in 1892. I think the most commonly used one is "batch" for a bread roll. I have never heard this used apart from in Coventry plus Bedworth and Nuneaton. Other that spring to mind are "jetty", for a small alleyway between houses, "on the box" for being on sick-leave from work, and a very rare one; This is "thrawl" which is the name for a stone or marble slab found in a food cupboard or pantry. This last one I wasn't certain of until I was chatting yesterday to another Coventry resident who had also heard of that word. Are there any more suggestions to add to the list?
Unique Coventry words and phrases
Rob Orland
Historic Coventry
All posts by this member
2 of 288  Tue 6th Apr 2010 8:59pm  
Webmaster: Joined Jan 2010  Total posts:1077

I can't think of any new ones right now, but I agree - "batch" is a very typical example. Funnily enough, I once spent a few weeks working at Beeston near Nottingham. On the first morning I asked what time tea-break was - and the reply was "The cob lady comes at 10 o'clock". So I said "yes, but what time's tea-break?" So he repeated his answer. So I then asked what on earth a cob-lady was.... and he looked confused and said "Don't you know what a cob is?" On seeing my blank expression he described a 'cob'. So I said..... "Oh I see, it's like a batch". He replied.... "What on earth is a batch?" Enough said!
Unique Coventry words and phrases
PhilipInCoventry
Holbrooks
All posts by this member
3 of 288  Wed 7th Apr 2010 11:43pm  
Moderator: Joined Apr 2010  Total posts:3862

Its all part of our lives and our identity, I wish I had studied the 'history of language' when I had the opportunity to do so. I was once working on a job in Colne, and I could not understand what 'Crimbo' was that was being talked about. It was Christmas holidays. Philip
Unique Coventry words and phrases
Midland Red
Cherwell
All posts by this member
4 of 288  Thu 8th Apr 2010 2:51pm  
Moderator: Joined Jan 2010  Total posts:4604

I've lived and worked in other parts of the country and I don't recall so many roads being prefixed with "The" as in Coventry For example, The Allesley Old Road The Holyhead Road The Kenilworth Road The London Road The Foleshill Road The Walsgrave Road
Unique Coventry words and phrases
dutchman
Spon End
All posts by this member
5 of 288  Thu 8th Apr 2010 7:46pm  
Member: Joined Mar 2010  Total posts:3033

You can tell someone is local if they can pronounce "Cheylesmore" and "Styvechale" or if they know the meaning of "Brumagem Screwdriver".
Unique Coventry words and phrases
Midland Red
Cherwell
All posts by this member
6 of 288  Thu 8th Apr 2010 7:50pm  
Moderator: Joined Jan 2010  Total posts:4604

. . . not forgetting Bed'uth and Long-ford ! Oh, and Awsley and Kersley ! And Fozull ! And Burk-swell !
Unique Coventry words and phrases
BrotherJoybert
Coventry
All posts by this member
7 of 288  Fri 9th Apr 2010 11:14am  
Member: Joined Jan 2010  Total posts:119

Do you remember when Mercia Sound first started broadcasting? Some of the adverts were hilarious! Wob-burly, Wick-in etc ... :)
Unique Coventry words and phrases
dutchman
Spon End
All posts by this member
8 of 288  Fri 9th Apr 2010 3:59pm  
Member: Joined Mar 2010  Total posts:3033

Don't know if this is peculiar to Coventry or not but my late housekeeper often used the phrase "On the knock" meaning to buy something on hire-purchase. It dates from the time when the "tallyman" used to knock at the door every week to collect payment.
Unique Coventry words and phrases
DBC
Nottinghamshire
All posts by this member
Thread starter
9 of 288  Fri 9th Apr 2010 11:20pm  
Member: Joined Apr 2010  Total posts:170

Midland Red said: I've lived and worked in other parts of the country and I don't recall so many roads being prefixed with "The" as in Coventry For example, The Allesley Old Road The Holyhead Road The Kenilworth Road The London Road The Foleshill Road The Walsgrave Road
And it's not only roads that are prefixed with "the". It also applies to places of work. So it's "The GEC", "The Jag" and "The Standard".
Unique Coventry words and phrases
PhilipInCoventry
Holbrooks
All posts by this member
10 of 288  Thu 15th Apr 2010 10:04am  
Off-topic / chat  

Bryn Thomas
Ammanford, South Wales
All posts by this member
11 of 288  Thu 27th May 2010 3:26pm  
Off-topic / chat  

weir
adelaide south australia
All posts by this member
12 of 288  Sun 30th May 2010 5:19am  
Member: Joined Jan 2010  Total posts:1

dutchman said: You can tell someone is local if they can pronounce "Cheylesmore" and "Styvechale" or if they know the meaning of "Brumagem Screwdriver".
I served my apprenticeship as a carpenter back in the fifties at Garlicks of Gosford St and if you knocked in a screw with a hammer you were said to have used Brummie screwdriver
Unique Coventry words and phrases
keynogstan
Coventry
All posts by this member
13 of 288  Sun 13th Jun 2010 11:27pm  
Member: Joined Jun 2010  Total posts:1

Thrawl: We had a thrawl in our pantry which was used to store perishables on, milk, meat, etc. I did not once find anyone outside of the area who had heard of the word, yet if you follow the link below, Wikipedia is saying it was used mostly in Yorkshire and Derbyshire. My mum was born in Sheffield, so maybe that's how we came to use it. http://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/thrawl
Unique Coventry words and phrases
PeteC
NZ
All posts by this member
14 of 288  Sat 10th Jul 2010 10:42am  
Member: Joined Jun 2010  Total posts:5

A few from my grandparents (born around 1907) in Hillfields: "It's black over Jack's mother's" - used when heavy rain was obviously on the way "I'll go to the foot of our stairs!" - when particularly surprised by something "I'll see you on the horses" - I never really did know what this meant but it was a 'goodbye' statement! It could be that the first 2 of these originated in west brom from my great grandparents - but they certainly became part of our Coventry family language over the last 100 years.
Unique Coventry words and phrases
downunder
Queensland. Australia
All posts by this member
15 of 288  Thu 15th Jul 2010 1:24am  
Member: Joined Aug 2011  Total posts:21

HI, my dad came from Bedworth and we were always told at bedtime to "go up the wooden hill", another and I still do is call relations "our" and dad always said when the storm was coming "it's black over Bill's mothers".
Unique Coventry words and phrases

You need to be signed in to respond to this topic

No actionNo action

Displaying 1 to 15 of 288 posts

Page 1 of 20

1 2 3 4 5 .... 10 .... 15 16 17 18 19 20
Next pageLast page

Previous (older) topic

Coventry Art and Artists
|

Next (newer) topic

Fleet Street
View similar topics in the Memories and Nostalgia category
 
Home | Forum index | Forum stats | Forum help | Log out | About me | My music
Top of the page
HTML5
1,411,859
Counter by Rob Orland

This page last updated 21st April 2017  (Load time: 126ms)