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King Henry VIII Grammar School

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Bags
Saltash
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1351 of 1386  Sun 19th Mar 2017 10:47pm  
Member: Joined Jul 2013  Total posts:102

Hold a massive book burning and get a load of homeless people to come and keep warm around the fire. Best use for the total tosh he scribbles.
King Henry VIII Grammar School
Last of the Inkers
Windsor
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1352 of 1386  Tue 21st Mar 2017 7:39pm  
Member: Joined Sep 2014  Total posts:205

Hello Rob, I would second Bags' suggestion about a 'Childhood Comic Heroes' thread, if that can be arranged. Or maybe 'Childhood Comics' as a more general topic. As regards the recent submissions that are very, very, very loosely based on the history of the school and how efforts might be made to uncover the 'real story' - um - here is my suggestion. I think they should go in the Non-Coventry category. How about a thread entiltled 'Education, Educashun, Ejukashun'? That seems suitably silly! Thank you. Thumbs up Edited by member, 21st Mar 2017 9:02 pm
King Henry VIII Grammar School
Roger Turner
Torksey
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1353 of 1386  Wed 22nd Mar 2017 11:15am  
Member: Joined Aug 2014  Total posts:482

`O Sage, I second that, at least the second bit. After "chicks own" I wasn`t allowed comics, although in my Dundee spell of life I did live opposite one of the editors/designer (?) of the Beano and Dandy and actually worked with his son.
King Henry VIII Grammar School
Slim
Another Coventry kid
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1354 of 1386  Mon 27th Mar 2017 8:48am  
Member: Joined Mar 2013  Total posts:382

Our physics lessons with Ron Hough were normally held in P3, which was one of the erstwhile buildings that looked as if it might have been used by the military in WW1. However, on one occasion, P3 was out of commission (essential maintenance, re-decoration or something) so we had been assigned to a different lab which was upstairs in what was known as the "New" Science Block. Ron Hough was an excellent teacher, not without an appropriate sense of humour. If you worked well, he praised you. He was also very strict, did not tolerate any tomfoolery or cheek, and had an explosive temper at the first sign of anyone acting up. Nobody wanted to incur his wrath. Back to the change of venue. As a few of us had just walked into the upstairs lab, there was an almighty bang, like a bomb going off, just outside on the landing. Ron Hough's face suffused with the red of anger, and he stormed out onto the landing. We all expected some poor boy to be on the receiving end. What had actually happened was that a member of staff, a lab steward, was the culprit. He was a quiet, inoffensive, meek and mild, wizened, diminutive chap wearing spectacles and a white coat, who looked out of place in the school - he would have been more at home on the film set of a Carry On film. One had to feel sorry for him. He was at the top of a stepladder, and had been attempting to lift down an object from the top shelf of one of the glass fronted cabinets. The object in question was some sort of large cathode ray tube used in physics. Obviously an expensive item, it was now smashed into several hundred pieces of broken glass all over the landing! On seeing what had happened, Ron Hough stopped in his tracks, gave a nonplussed look, said nothing, and returned to the lab.
King Henry VIII Grammar School
Derek Skelcher
Bristol
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1355 of 1386  Wed 24th May 2017 12:56pm  
Member: Joined May 2017  Total posts:7

On 9th Sep 2011 10:44am, Midland Red said: Anyone care to reminisce about Ernst Kolisch?
I remember Dr Kolisch very well. He was my Form Master in 1942/43 when I was in Form 2 and made me Homework Monitor. He taught me Latin for which I am extremely grateful, even helped with what might be in the mid term exams by telling us which piece of The Trojan War was being used. I even remember to this day part of it! "Cives cubicuae sunt" "All the citizens were in their beds!" He also in year 4 and 5 taught me German, the only subject I ever came top in and in which I am still reasonably fluent today. He failed however in trying to teach me maths!
King Henry VIII Grammar School
Earlsdon Kid
Argyll & Bute, Scotland
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1356 of 1386  Wed 24th May 2017 2:03pm  
Member: Joined Apr 2017  Total posts:17

I was taught physics by Ron Hough at KH and was encouraged to learn a bit about radio communications which ended up with obtaining a "Radio Amateurs" City and Guilds certificate. I remember the fun we had constructing a large (about 10ft long with a 6ft square ground screen from memory) helical antenna mounted in a barrel of concrete which was placed on the roof of the (then) new science block and fed through a frequency converter into a SW telecommunications receiver located in a small room on the upper floor. The intent was to pick up weather satellite transmissions. The control system for positioning the antenna towards a satellite consisted of a human (student) chain relaying spoken commands from the receiver room along the corridor, through the roof access door and to another student at the antenna. Commands consisted of "left a bit", "up a bit", "back a bit" and so on in the manner of "The Navy Lark" so imagine our delight in eventually hearing what seemed to be a Russian voice emanating from the receivers' loudspeaker! Upon using the human command chain to establish where the antenna was directed we discovered that it was pointed down toward the city centre and we finally decided that the Russian voice was probably from a city taxi radio. The whole operation had some risk associated with it and on a particularly windy day we nearly lost the antenna over the edge of the roof along with the three or four of us that were holding onto it. This was long before any safety rails had been fitted around the flat roof. I see from google street view that the roof now has railings but I'd be interested to know how long the helical antenna survived after I left in 1970. Incidentally, I believe that Ron Hough was responsible for handing out stickers "Always ask WHY" as a way of encouraging us to be enquiring. I've always remembered this bit of advice which can be quite intimidating to even the most capable scientist.
King Henry VIII Grammar School
Derek Skelcher
Bristol
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1357 of 1386  Wed 24th May 2017 2:57pm  
Member: Joined May 2017  Total posts:7

I must be one of the earliest ex-pupils on your site as I started at KHVIII Junior School in January 1941 so was there before it was bombed. I can remember the tuck shop, which was the small building on its own in the playground and later became the Music Room. I even had one school lunch, I recall, sausage and mash on that day. I also had several PT lessons in the gym which had climbing rails as I recall, Then came the April Blitz. As I remember it the school was struck by 31 incendiaries, all but one of which were successfully put out. That particular one landed in a spot were it had been predicted that if that was to happen it would be almost impossible to get at and extinguish - and that was the one that altered my education future! I was heartbroken as I had left my brand new Venus pencil case in my desk and it was destroyed in the fire. The Junior School was transferred to a large empty private house in Belvedere Road, owned by Coventry dentist named Cleverly, which had a swimming pool in the garden and 20s style decoration of all the rooms. I remained there until I got a special place and went to the Main School in September 1941. There we were taught in temporary classrooms built on part of the school playing field. Except for science, for which we had to go - the shame of it - to Bablake School - and a weekly morning assembly which took place in the Coventry Technical College Theatre in Albany Road. Eventually we started to have a morning assembly in the playground. At that time, I suffered the same fate as any other "fuzzer" most mornings, by being thrown into the first holly bush on Spencer Park across the road from the school! Later on, I think in 1942 school hours changed and we had to attend in shifts, two each day, some days consecutive ones, other days with a gap between the two. PT was all of the "arms bend, knees stretch" kind in the playground. When there were any daytime air raids we had to use dug out shelters in the playing fields. What with their existence, the ground used for the class rooms and the area used by the Headmaster's cultivation of potatoes there wasn't too much left for rugger or cricket, but enough!
King Henry VIII Grammar School
Midland Red
Cherwell
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Thread starter
1358 of 1386  Wed 24th May 2017 4:47pm  
Moderator: Joined Jan 2010  Total posts:4603

Fascinating insight into times at KHVIII even before PhilipinCoventry and I started there (1954) - thank you for posting this Thumbs up
King Henry VIII Grammar School
Last of the Inkers
Windsor
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1359 of 1386  Wed 28th Jun 2017 11:47pm  
Member: Joined Sep 2014  Total posts:205

The challenge for me in adding further posts to this thread is, most definitely, to stay ‘on topic.’ When one has been through the entire repertoire of moans and gripes several times already, this becomes quite a difficult exercise. I did privately engage in some ‘alternative thinking’, in which I endeavoured to recall all the good that came into my life as a consequence of my period of confinement - sorry, joyous school days - but when the ‘number one’ on my list became, unequivocally, ‘Poker Dice’ I had to acknowledge that a significant degree of barrel scraping was taking place. Therefore, I am going to try something different. We are now fifty years on from the ‘The Summer Of Love’ and history appears to be repeating itself, which I find somewhat unnerving. But back in 1967, if a bearded bohemian had appeared on-stage at a music festival, preaching peace, I might have said something like “Groovy and far out, man”, whilst raising my fingers in the v-sign. Whereas in 2017, exactly the same thing occurred and I said something like “You have the potential to be a very dangerous and subversive human being”, whilst raising my fingers in the v-sign. Convinced of the validity of my assessment, I returned to completing a crossword, enjoying a soothing cup of tea and nibbling on a scrumptious slice of bakewell tart. Then the horrific realization struck me. “Oh, no! I have turned into my teachers!” What happens to us as we age? Do we become psychologically exhausted by constant change such that we crave just a few days of “Nothing going on”? Whereas on the contrary, when one is young, “Nothing going on” demands of us that we “Make something happen”. Of course, I can presently comprehend why the teachers of 1967 were so conservative in attitude. To my adolescent self they possessed about as much zest as a cow suspended in formaldehyde. Now I am clearly recognizing that they were easing down, looking forward to their retirement years with minimal disruption and that, yes, the “Sergeant Pepper’s” album was not a triumph, as I once believed, but a blooming racket. Which makes me wonder about the bearded person on the festival stage, who was, without question, of the older generation. Where has he been since then, such that his youthful idealism has remained intact? Perhaps it is apposite to invoke a complaint from the elderly that abounded back in that glorious summer of yore. “One thing is for certain. He hasn’t done a day’s work in his life.” Smile
King Henry VIII Grammar School
Dreamtime
Perth Western Australia
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1360 of 1386  Thu 29th Jun 2017 4:41am  
Member: Joined Jan 2010  Total posts:2898

Morning LOTI, I do believe you have arrived into the real world at last, however I hope you still have more to tell us of what your thoughts are on that transition! Incidentally, bakewell tart was then and still is my favourite nibble with a soothing cuppa. Thumbs up
King Henry VIII Grammar School
Midland Red
Cherwell
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Thread starter
1361 of 1386  Thu 29th Jun 2017 8:47am  
Moderator: Joined Jan 2010  Total posts:4603

LOTI - shouldn't you have been tucked up in bed at 11.47pm - at your age? Wink
King Henry VIII Grammar School
Last of the Inkers
Windsor
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1362 of 1386  Thu 29th Jun 2017 10:43am  
Member: Joined Sep 2014  Total posts:205

Hello Dreamtime, Yes, I have been deliberately avoiding the thread entitled "You know when you've got old", but I am beginning to think that it will become the natural home for my musings. Things have definitely changed. For instance, in 1967 or thereabouts, I was the proud owner of a pair of bell-bottomed trousers. Well, the trousers have long gone, but the bell bottom seems here to stay. Worryingly, cake is becoming my main source of comfort. You realise that you are in trouble on this issue when you seriously think about getting a Mary Berry poster to hang on your wall. Okay, I made that last bit up. Smile
King Henry VIII Grammar School
Last of the Inkers
Windsor
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1363 of 1386  Thu 29th Jun 2017 10:56am  
Member: Joined Sep 2014  Total posts:205

Hi Midland Red, Normally, yes. As a rule, the only time I am up after 11pm is when the cats have refused to come in when called and I have to go hunting for them wearing my nightgown and slippers. Little blighters. I'm thinking of investing in a pair of night vision goggles because they don't make torches as powerful as they used to. Can't see a ruddy thing out there. However, I am presently experimenting with the afternoon siesta and it seems to have paid off. This isn't because I am getting old, you understand. It is simply that I possess a Mediterranean temperament.
King Henry VIII Grammar School
Midland Red
Cherwell
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Thread starter
1364 of 1386  Thu 29th Jun 2017 11:14am  
Moderator: Joined Jan 2010  Total posts:4603

Afternoon siestas are highly recommended - in fact, I think senior citizens should receive some kind of Siesta Benefit (say £200 pa) to enable them (us) to enjoy them a little more Thumbs up
King Henry VIII Grammar School
Roger Turner
Torksey
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1365 of 1386  Thu 29th Jun 2017 3:15pm  
Member: Joined Aug 2014  Total posts:482

On 24th May 2017 2:57pm, Derek Skelcher said: I must be one of the earliest ex-pupils on your site as I started at KHVIII Junior School in January 1941 so was there before it was bombed. I can remember the tuck shop, which was the small building on its own in the playground and later became the Music Room. I even had one school lunch, I recall, sausage and mash on that day. I also had several PT lessons in the gym which had climbing rails as I recall, Then came the April Blitz. As I remember it the school was struck by 31 incendiaries, all but one of which were successfully put out. That particular one landed in a spot were it had been predicted that if that was to happen it would be almost impossible to get at and extinguish - and that was the one that altered my education future! I was heartbroken as I had left my brand new Venus pencil case in my desk and it was destroyed in the fire. The Junior School was transferred to a large empty private house in Belvedere Road, owned by Coventry dentist named Cleverly, which had a swimming pool in the garden and 20s style decoration of all the rooms. I remained there until I got a special place and went to the Main School in September 1941. There we were taught in temporary classrooms built on part of the school playing field. Except for science, for which we had to go - the shame of it - to Bablake School - and a weekly morning assembly which took place in the Coventry Technical College Theatre in Albany Road. Eventually we started to have a morning assembly in the playground. At that time, I suffered the same fate as any other "fuzzer" most mornings, by being thrown into the first holly bush on Spencer Park across the road from the school! Later on, I think in 1942 school hours changed and we had to attend in shifts, two each day, some days consecutive ones, other days with a gap between the two. PT was all of the "arms bend, knees stretch" kind in the playground. When there were any daytime air raids we had to use dug out shelters in the playing fields. What with their existence, the ground used for the class rooms and the area used by the Headmaster's cultivation of potatoes there wasn't too much left for rugger or cricket, but enough!
Thank you Derek, That`s better more the atmosphere of the school I attended, mind you a bit later than you (1947-1951). Yes, the assembly in the playground every morning, hail, rain or the other, perhaps you had Mr. Burton during your time, he retired shortly after I arrived and went to New Zealand (?), where he assured us we wouldn`t hear the last of him, as he would be keeping a close eye on the Latin outcomes. He conducted assembly every morning from the platform of a short flight of steps left after the bombing in the furthest corner of the yard and I always remember his old green felt hat that he removed from his head as he issued the order "Hats Off" and placed it under his arm - I say placed, more like scrunched. Initially most of my lessons were conducted in the huts apart from Science and RI (Holy Joe who christened us, collectively, I think, as having emanated from the gutters of the back streets of Coventry and kept on keeping on about this chap Yaweh, who at least I had never heard of and signally failed in establishing religion as having any relevance to my being or indeed any influence on my future life). Yes we did PT, there was a hut allocated for that (Mr. Bullcock) no wall bars obviously, but we did do all the galloping at, over and through the box horse, often since I have pictured the consequences of performing the same exercises the modern way with small trampolines (truly a roof raising prospect). Ah, the Headmaster`s potato patch - it was still there when I arrived, complete with a couple of youthful looking attendants (I think one was called Smith), anyway I was told they were senior pupils who had done the work during the war (contribution to "Dig for Victory") and had in fact been "kept on" after the war - don`t know if they were waiting for discharge papers or a P45. So our Music Room, a wooden hut, was the original tuck shop, I can remember a Mr. Shaw (another more dapper and sane one, not Piggy) conducting group singing from some sort of traditional red covered school song book, with airs such as Barbara Allen, Bonnie Dundee, the Milkman of Paddington Green (a role later taken on by Benny Hill) and the musical version of Sir Henry Newbolt`s "Drakes Drum" which has remained, for me, a lifetime`s favourite and inspiration. Perhaps you also had staff - J.B. Young-Evans (Pip) Greek, Maxie Goldstein (Latin)
King Henry VIII Grammar School

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