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Canals around Coventry

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Kaga simpson
Peacehaven, East Sussex
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376 of 386  Tue 25th Jun 2019 3:49pm  
Member: Joined Sep 2014  Total posts:3018

When I think of the Coventry of two centuries ago, my mind goes to Constable's painting of 'The Lock'. A beautiful painting of what could have been on the Sherbourne instead of the Stour. The Sherbourne had to have been a much greater river as they called it the 'Severn' - it once covered Spon End and West Orchard to the depth of 5/6 feet in a violent storm, trapping the people in St John's Church for some time until rescued by horse and wagon. Although a landscape painter rather than an history painter, it gives a clear view of what old locks were about. He also painted several water mills in the early 19th century so we can imagine what Pool Meadow once looked like - or I can.
Canals around Coventry
Kaga simpson
Peacehaven, East Sussex
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377 of 386  Wed 3rd Jul 2019 11:26am  
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"Okay, let's get this monkey into the cut, now its bottom's been cleaned". These are the words I would expect about to be uttered by the guy in the narrowboat (taken about 1880) on post #50, Wyken Slough topic. He owned the repair yard at Tusses Bridge, employed the men in the picture, ten boats and the horses to tow them, a wharf in Coventry Basin, offices in Bishop Street, and a number of houses and a couple of pubs. 'Monkey' was the nickname of a butty boat - cleaned and repaired, the boat is on the slipway ready to be slipped into the cut. His sons, born on the boats, followed his calling - one of his grandsons was the last man to leave working on the cut for Inland Waterways in the Coventry area, the man responsible for stopping the cut from draining between Brinklow and Sutton Stop during the war. In 1855 all narrowboats had to be registered and licensed to trade. The first pleasure boat to berth in Coventry Basin was in 1954, it was towed by hand from New Inn Bridge to the basin, to stop the engine from being fouled.
Canals around Coventry
Midland Red
Cherwell
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378 of 386  Mon 9th Sep 2019 4:32pm  
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Sutton Stop, by James Kessell
Canals around Coventry
NeilsYard
Coventry
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379 of 386  Mon 16th Sep 2019 11:07am  
Member: Joined Aug 2010  Total posts:2204

Does anyone have any images of the coal bunkers at the Basin pre-development or when in use, that today make up 'The Tin' music venue?
Canals around Coventry
Kaga simpson
Peacehaven, East Sussex
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380 of 386  Tue 17th Sep 2019 1:56pm  
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NeilsYard, What is your idea of a coal bunker? What are you looking for? Neil, to me a coal bunker/cellar was under the house or road, where people stored their coal for burning - to me there was nothing at the basin to my knowledge except wharves and weighbridges. I think people have the wrong idea. The canal coal business was very small part, it was for heavy goods and mostly water the wharf at Coventry Basin was built especially for, and by a water-carrier, there were more water carriers at the basin than coal people in the beginning for the best part of a century. Now to me the best place to trace the coal chute from pavement to bunker was in Palmer Lane as I posted on that topic but few people seemed interested. The biggest customer in Coventry for coal was Longford Power Station, supplied by train, stored in the open by conveyor belts - the only danger was if the heaps got too hot, so regularly moved around by hand and belts.
Canals around Coventry
NeilsYard
Coventry
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381 of 386  Tue 17th Sep 2019 2:05pm  
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Kaga - they were these. They now make up The Tin Music venue.
Canals around Coventry
Kaga simpson
Peacehaven, East Sussex
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382 of 386  Tue 17th Sep 2019 2:55pm  
Member: Joined Sep 2014  Total posts:3018

Neil, Doubt very much they were storage for coal, have no idea where they are or their use.
Canals around Coventry
NeilsYard
Coventry
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383 of 386  Tue 17th Sep 2019 4:10pm  
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Canals around Coventry
Kaga simpson
Peacehaven, East Sussex
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384 of 386  Wed 18th Sep 2019 9:36am  
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NeilsYard, The last time I saw those tunnels was in the early fifties, and completely different, completely encased in the brick building. They had great wooden doors either side, a brick building above them, there had been a wooden staircase fixed to the wall that led to the top floor. On the water side was in bad state. I was sleeping aboard an old working motor boat converted to a houseboat, the very first one to do so, right where that one is moored in your photo - the building you see through them was Cartwrights timber yard, where I worked for a couple of weeks, to put me on the tax radar. And as far as I know they were built as entrance and storage tunnels for water wagons, but let's go back to early 18th century.
Canals around Coventry
scrutiny
coventry
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385 of 386  Wed 18th Sep 2019 9:47am  
Member: Joined Feb 2010  Total posts:683

Cannot say I remember the arches but I do remember the great stack of coals against the wall. Used to play in the basin in the 50s, much to the despair of our mothers we used to slide down the coal heaps. Thumbs up
Canals around Coventry
Kaga simpson
Peacehaven, East Sussex
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386 of 386  Wed 18th Sep 2019 11:05am  
Member: Joined Sep 2014  Total posts:3018

I have to do it this way, I lose so much. The Coventry Canal, or "Navigation” as it was first called, was obtained by an Act of Parliament in April 1768. It opened August the following year, the first two loads of coal from Bedworth came into the Coventry Basin to great applause. The canal system helped to facilitate the removal of heavy goods from place to place, before the better roads of 1800. Goods damaged in those days by water were often dried in a malt kiln. Thomas Bache did a lot of water carrying trade. I believe he built the first warehouse for his cart. His cart was a barrel on wheels which held 100/30 gallons of water let out of a tap into buckets at a halfpenny each. The water carts of which there was about half a dozen helped the supply of water to the city before the opening of the water supply from Spon End water works around 1830 - these Coventry water carriers were named Frank Crab, Billy Tibbets, "Short-Arm" Johnson, and "Bacco" Westwick. Thomas Goodall was the agent for the canal company at the canal house. After that era then coal became more prominent. But it would be doubtful that coal was stored there as it was the main entrance to the basin, the weighbridge gates used mostly for outgoing.
Canals around Coventry

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