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Smithford Street (inc. Ram Bridge)

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Heathite
Coventry
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436 of 448  Fri 5th Jun 2020 10:15am  
Member: Joined Aug 2012  Total posts:664

Moving mosaic in sections.
Smithford Street (inc. Ram Bridge)
Kaga simpson
Peacehaven, East Sussex
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437 of 448  Fri 5th Jun 2020 10:23am  
Member: Joined Sep 2014  Total posts:3719

Helen The bit with the old cobble stones, behind the White Lion at the time of the butter market and what became the new market hall, and the watch houses up till about 1865 was paved in "Petrified Kidneys" cobbles, unpleasant to walk on. Have no idea what they were like, or looked like but as the stocks stood on them at sometime, I think they had some thing to do with them.
Smithford Street (inc. Ram Bridge)
Helen F
Warrington
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438 of 448  Fri 5th Jun 2020 12:06pm  
Moderator: Joined Mar 2013  Total posts:2228

You're doing a grand job with the photos keeping us informed Heathite Thumbs up Yes, Kaga, the original cobbles were river pebbles and they are hard to walk on. I think that dirt must have filled the gaps in to a certain extent. There are road surfaces in some of the oldest Coventry photos and the modern cobbles are almost invisible because of the dirt covering them. A few places I've visited still have proper cobbles but they're low traffic areas and well tended. Cobbles would have been on all the main roads and the entries to yards and stabling. The White Lion cobbles marked such an entry although I think that they were reused bricks in the trench? Instead of the fancy mock Tudor front there was a simpler arrangement with a big archway in the middle. Behind there was a courtyard and stabling. The bricks probably date from that era, although bricks were also used to line room floors once they became cheap. Thee were a number of stocks round the city, most of them stood on the water conduit platforms. We know about the one next to the watch house but there was also one in West Orchard, next to the bridge and the one we see in St Mary's Hall courtyard was originally just opposite, against the cathedral. Those three locations may have popped up once the conduits were destroyed. It makes sense that criminals were punished where other people went regularly. Where more so than the only water supplies at the time?
Smithford Street (inc. Ram Bridge)
Malvern
Somerset
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439 of 448  Fri 5th Jun 2020 2:04pm  
Member: Joined Jun 2016  Total posts:64

Kaga, I'm afraid I'm struggling to get back beyond William Hewitt born 1819. There were already a great number of Hewitts in Coventry by the end of the 18th century and tracing family lines is not helped by the fact that some were "Dissenters" (Non-conformists, Wesleyans, Quakers etc), which whilst the records are good are not so easy to link. My family (the Carvells) came to Coventry in 1780 from Hillmorton near Rugby. They were Tailors in Spon Street, Bailey Lane, Gosford Street and East Street through the 19th century. My research is providing a lot of information regarding the state of politics in Coventry around the time of the Reform Act from 1832 to the mid 1860s. There seems to have been great tensions between the traditional Tories, the Whig-Radicals and the "Mongrels", which interacted with religious sectarianism and also the institutions of the Freemen and the Guilds to make city politics a very murky place. My ancestors seem to have been minor players among the prominent Freemen but I keep coming up with the same names. The council seems to have been run by a group of Freemen, who spent a lot of the time protecting their own self-interests, whilst claiming they were looking after the ordinary townspeople. This was of course at the time of the Chartists. It is proving quite difficult trying to get to grips with the power struggles which makes today's politics seem quite tame! One letter regarding a protest against the Vicars Rate set by Rev. John Colllison of St Michael's in 1848 features the following list of signatories (The case revolved around whether the Vicar or the Churchwardens (Freemen) should have the power to levy and decide the Church rate on freehold property owners in the Parish. It eventually went to the High Court in London who found in favour of the Rate-payers and against the Vicar): Abel Rotherham - a Draper of Smithford Street and later Butts Lane (described in a report of the time as "Honest Abel", the verbose, prickly, self-righteous, humourless and proudly incorruptible Wesleyan Methodist liberal draper of Smithford Street, the most unpopular man in Coventry) Henry Lea - Solicitor of Little Park Street S Nuttall Wm Amos Packwood - Veterinary Surgeon of Greyfriars Lane Wm Rotherham - Lawyer of Priory Row Jas Foot - Master Saddler of Smithford Street Thos Banbury - Shirt manufacturer of Spon Street (Mayor of Coventry in 1836,1845 and 1846) John Royle - of Little Park Street D Spencer (Overseer) - Draper and benefactor of Hay Lane (remembered for his bequests to create Coventry Technical College and Spencer Park etc...) E England Samuel Berry (Overseer) - Ribbon Manufacturer of Radford Road Josh Arch William Illiffe - Stationer of Smithford Street Thos Ransford (Overseer) - Grocer, Hop factor and dealer in British wines of Earl Street Joseph Loveitt - Chemist of Broadgate Joseph Barnes sen of Summerland Butts Joseph Brown - Silk Dyer of Thomas Street Henry Conway - Proprietor of Houses of Butts Benjamin Kerby - Watch Maker of Spon Street Wm Carvell - Tailor of Spon Street (my 4th great grandfather) Joseph Olorenshaw - Carpenter/Joiner of Junction Street Edward Rosser Kerby - Watch Manufacturer of Spon Street Another person who appears frequently in my family's history is William Browett, a draper of Smithford Street. He was David Spencer's master, as an apprentice. I could probably write a book about him alone, if I had the time!
Malvern

Smithford Street (inc. Ram Bridge)
Kaga simpson
Peacehaven, East Sussex
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440 of 448  Sat 6th Jun 2020 11:53am  
Member: Joined Sep 2014  Total posts:3719

Malvern At one time Amos Packwood was the largest coach operator in Coventry, the Freemen were religious people and foremen, the mass of people didn't have a vote, not until WWI. The old Victorian class system didn't really go out until WWII.
Smithford Street (inc. Ram Bridge)
Helen F
Warrington
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441 of 448  Tue 23rd Jun 2020 5:50pm  
Moderator: Joined Mar 2013  Total posts:2228

We were debating when the trams vanished from Smithford Street. I've found a newspaper report that must be early October 1932 stating that the tram track grooves, complete with metal rails were filled in the previous day from Broadgate to Spon Street.
Smithford Street (inc. Ram Bridge)
PeterB
Mount Nod
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442 of 448  Tue 23rd Jun 2020 6:55pm  
Member: Joined May 2014  Total posts:303

The Broadgate to Allesley Old Road service finished on the 5th March 1932
Smithford Street (inc. Ram Bridge)
Kaga simpson
Peacehaven, East Sussex
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443 of 448  Wed 24th Jun 2020 8:53am  
Member: Joined Sep 2014  Total posts:3719

Helen The trouble is, no one dates these damn photos. I had trouble with post 321 that clearly shows them filled in and yet 328 post did not and no dates. Again, when discussing the White Lion, the soldiers were clearing the rubble but no tram lines, and I had no tracing to date them. To me this dating is the most important part of a photo. Helen your work is fantastic, but I have a hell of a job sorting out what era it belongs to. Help!
Smithford Street (inc. Ram Bridge)
Helen F
Warrington
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444 of 448  Wed 24th Jun 2020 9:35am  
Moderator: Joined Mar 2013  Total posts:2228

You're not the only one who has trouble dating things Kaga Thumbs up Very few images come with dates unless they have been taken from a newspaper or a postcard with a postmark. Even then an image may not have been used directly after the photo was taken. I know that they filled the rails in about October 1932 because next to the photo and caption was a list of rainfall stats for September 1932. I may have a note of which newspaper it was but I'm not sure where I put the notes. The photo is very poor and not worth putting up. As I live about 2.5 hours away from the Herbert Museum History Centre I don't visit very often and when I do I'm sifting through loads of images and plans. I try to keep a record of the stuff I collect but I don't always remember. Anything I pick up from the 19th and 20th century is incidental. My goal is the Civil War. Pre tram.
Smithford Street (inc. Ram Bridge)
NeilsYard
Coventry
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445 of 448  Mon 29th Jun 2020 2:37pm  
Member: Joined Aug 2010  Total posts:2669

Another new one for me.
Smithford Street (inc. Ram Bridge)
Kaga simpson
Peacehaven, East Sussex
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446 of 448  Mon 29th Jun 2020 3:30pm  
Member: Joined Sep 2014  Total posts:3719

NeilsYard, Bombed building, look at any before blitz photo's.
Smithford Street (inc. Ram Bridge)
Prof
Gloucester
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447 of 448  Mon 29th Jun 2020 4:08pm  
Member: Joined Jul 2014  Total posts:1428

I remember it well Neil!
Smithford Street (inc. Ram Bridge)
NeilsYard
Coventry
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448 of 448  Mon 29th Jun 2020 8:36pm  
Member: Joined Aug 2010  Total posts:2669

I still think they should’ve left the White Lion mosaic where it was - treated/preserved and covered with some kind of Perspex. It was the only indicator of the line of the original street. Would have been cheaper too. Sadly it’s all been removed now and the whole area covered in tarmac Sad Sad
Smithford Street (inc. Ram Bridge)

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