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Photographers - can you believe this?

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Midland Red
Cherwell
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1 of 13  Wed 28th Nov 2012 7:20pm  
Moderator: Joined Jan 2010  Total posts:5009

From Amateur Photography : Council officials have officially warned all photographers - including amateurs and those with camera phones - that they must seek permission to take pictures at council-run events, including those designed to celebrate Christmas. Merthyr Tydfil County Borough Council confirmed the restrictions after freelance photographer Andrew Bartlett was told to stop taking pictures at a publicly-accessible Christmas lights event earlier this month. Bartlett had complained that a 'Santa assistant' - later revealed to be a council official - had approached him at a Christmas-themed market in the Welsh town. In a statement, issued to Amateur Photographer (AP), the council said: 'We understand the frustration of any photographer who may not be able to take photographs freely at events such as the Christmas Ilumination Ceremony, especially given their hobby and enthusiasm for photography. 'However, as a local authority, we require all photographers and media agencies to secure permission from the council's Corporate Communications department prior to arriving on site.' The council said it does not currently hold an official photography policy but that this is 'being reviewed with a view to putting a policy in place in the near future'. The statement continued: 'The council has a duty of care during events to members of the public, and has the right to question all photographers. 'We ask all those wishing to film or take photos to complete a media request in advance and ensure that all appropriate consents/permissions are secured during photography sessions. 'As a result of this, should any photographer wish to attend any future council-run events to take photographs, we recommend that they contact the Corporate Communications department prior to the event in order for us to support any requests and advise accordingly.' A council spokesperson said the same rules apply to members of the public using camera phones. Bartlett today told AP that the council has since sent him a copy of the rules. I've sent this to AP: Orwell wrote 1984 as a nightmare scenario of the future - he could not have expected that every part of his novel would come true in the Britain of today. Doublespeak and doublethink are the everyday tools of politicians and petty officials. Free speech went years ago. Our every move is monitored by CCTV or via our mobile phones and computers. We have no rights any more except those changed and contradicted on a daily basis by those in power in the UK or the EU. However - every kid and his dad (figure of speech - not meant as sexist or childist!) has a means of taking pics with them at virtually all times - mischief says we should have a day when we all apply on-line or in person for these (I'm sure) non existent permits, and ruin some of these 'officials' day. The DSLR is becoming more un-acceptable than a 9mm Walther PPK on the streets today. I now have a pocket camera that shoots in RAW and gives excellent results in 'street' photography - with the plethora of folks having the same or similar no one takes any notice. Keep the SLR for landscapes or wildlife photography - until we have the 'revolution' that is. Bruce Baker-Johnson
Photographers - can you believe this?
TonyS
Coventry
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2 of 13  Wed 28th Nov 2012 8:19pm  
Moderator: Joined Jan 2011  Total posts:1560

Hi Cliff, that's a very interesting (and frustrating) article - one that could easily open a whole can of worms! Obviously those togs that require some sort of access to the front-of-stage at an event would require permission to enter a restricted area. I heard a rumour that Coventry Council were asking freelance togs to agree to supply a copy of all images taken before they would give them access to the pit area in front of the stage at the event (without such positioning it's almost impossible to get decent pics). I guess this is aimed at those who might want to gain financially from the sale of such images. But I would add, that hasn't been confirmed to me. Although I really don't see how they can expect to stop people taking photos at a public event. I know at things like school events they often request that people wanting to take photos should supply their details to staff prior to using their cameras. I seem to recall the organisers also requesting members of the public to register their cameras during the "UK Childrens Games" in 2005. I think the only reasonable claim for any of this is if the event is on private property, where they could throw you out if you fail to get the necessary permission (similar to the NEC and such places that display signs that say "No photography/videograpy allowed" - however, if you are standing in a public place, taking photo's of a subject situated in a public place, I don't see how they can prevent anyone from taking photographs. Just my opinion Thumbs up
Photographers - can you believe this?
Mike H
London Ontario, Canada
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3 of 13  Sun 2nd Dec 2012 3:42am  
Member: Joined Apr 2012  Total posts:440

'No photography' has been around for years. Previously, public places and events covered themselves by suggesting that 'flash' would adversely affect either an exhibit or whatever. I was challenged on occasion, but I used fast film and didn't require flash. lol. They want you to buy the official programmes, c/w the official photographs for which 'royalties' have already been paid.
Photographers - can you believe this?
Dreamtime
Perth Western Australia
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4 of 13  Sun 2nd Dec 2012 3:54am  
Member: Joined Jan 2010  Total posts:3126

Ok. So if I want to take photos of the neighbours' Christmas outside house displays will I have to ask their permission first? Smile Oh my
Photographers - can you believe this?
TonyS
Coventry
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5 of 13  Sun 2nd Dec 2012 8:22am  
Moderator: Joined Jan 2011  Total posts:1560

As the lights are on public display, I don't think you will have a problem Thumbs up
Photographers - can you believe this?
Dreamtime
Perth Western Australia
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6 of 13  Sun 2nd Dec 2012 3:51pm  
Member: Joined Jan 2010  Total posts:3126

Thanks Tony, best to be safe than sorry these days. Wave
Photographers - can you believe this?
Old Lincolnian
Coventry
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7 of 13  Mon 3rd Dec 2012 6:51pm  
Member: Joined Sep 2012  Total posts:486

My daughter's partner is a photographer and has been prevented from taking photographs of the outside of some public buildings as it would be a "terrorist risk" even though there are plenty of similar photographs freely available on the internet, and also photographs with young children in the background especially at seaside locations. It all seems to depend on the local council. There was a group that sprang up in opposition to this called "I'm a photographer not a terrorist" which held flash mob events (excuse the pun) to photograph public buildings. I also seem to remember some visitors to Coventry were stopped taking pictures in West Orchards as well about a year ago.
Photographers - can you believe this?
TonyS
Coventry
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8 of 13  Mon 3rd Dec 2012 8:14pm  
Moderator: Joined Jan 2011  Total posts:1560

This is very much the "can of worms" that I spoke of in my post above. I'm not sure whether following more recent incidents the law has been changed regarding photographing certain public buildings - but I recall the huge debate on-line some time ago about certain "security" personnel attempting to prevent photographers from taking photos of buildings. At the time, it transpired they had no right at all to stop anyone - but maybe that has now been changed. As for photographing "people" in public places (and this includes children) - there is no law to stop you. If "the subject" is in such a place where they could reasonably expect to be seen by members of the public, then their photograph can be taken. If any photo is likely to include a child who's image might be "recognisable" - for the sake of clarity, I would always recommend to try and speak to the parent or guardian first. If requested to cease by a Police Officer it's always best to do so, but the officer has no legal grounds to prevent you from taking the pics. Although it may be that the officer, by allowing you to continue taking the pics, might fear that a public order offence may be committed (i.e. an irate parent beating you up!) but other than that, and assuming you are committing no other offence, then he has no legal grounds to prevent you going about your business (or hobby or whatever) This issue has been debated for years, and I guess everyone will have their own opinions on the subject. Smile I meant to say; West Orchards, I believe, is private property, so someone of authority would be within their rights to request that you stop, or leave.
Photographers - can you believe this?
PhilipInCoventry
Holbrooks
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9 of 13  Tue 4th Dec 2012 4:27pm  
Moderator: Joined Apr 2010  Total posts:4058

Hi all Wave The problems involved with the recording sound or pictures have been taken onto another level in the last decade by one factor above any other. The Internet. People have often found themselves in hot water whether recording pics at a Greek airport, or the Royals from times past. It is the fact that now, within minutes of a picture being recorded anywhere, Dreamtime, Mayjan, Dutchman & I can be viewing it now, here on our forum. We no longer have to wait for an organisation to broadcast or print it. The law, which is slow to catch up with technology as has always been, has one or two sticks up its sleeve. If anyone does anything that has consequences, they may find that they are liable for the costs or damages that result. The man who went for a swim in the Thames & spoilt the boat-race is such a case, even though there is not a statute to say we cannot swim in the Thames. A police officer can ask anything of anyone within reason, & failure to comply may lead to a charge of a breach of the peace. That would need upholding in a law court. The one sure thing about law, is simply, that there is not a lot that is sure. Wave
Photographers - can you believe this?
Dreamtime
Perth Western Australia
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10 of 13  Wed 5th Dec 2012 3:30am  
Member: Joined Jan 2010  Total posts:3126

Most interesting comments from above. When I went to take the Christmas photos up the street, I did ask one of the ladies talking outside and she said 'go for it'. No problem there, which I did not think there would be. This morning I went to a 'Gymbaroo', a little tots' dancing class with Indie (she is the little blonde girl in the Christmas photos) the dancing teacher said you must ask the mums first and luckily they were quite happy for me to take a couple of photos. So I guess a lot depends on who and where you are. It does pay you to ask these days. Wave
Photographers - can you believe this?
morgana
the secret garden
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11 of 13  Mon 10th Dec 2012 11:10pm  
Member: Joined Nov 2011  Total posts:2216

I don't understand all the fuss of taking photos of buildings because of terrorism when we have google street maps taking photos of anything that's by a road, which a lot of local government buildings and shops are, not so long ago, while they were going around the streets, they were taking our stuff off our computers too if any one left them switched on. The horror on the face of my doctor's receptionist when I told her what they had done.
Photographers - can you believe this?
Midland Red
Cherwell
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Thread starter
12 of 13  Tue 11th Dec 2012 8:53am  
Moderator: Joined Jan 2010  Total posts:5009

My sister-in-law appears on the Google street view in the front garden of their house Oh my
Photographers - can you believe this?
morgana
the secret garden
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13 of 13  Tue 11th Dec 2012 5:54pm  
Member: Joined Nov 2011  Total posts:2216

Yes Midland Red, that is exactly what I mean, you can have them taken off and your house but big questions are asked why you want it removed as if you are a criminal with some thing to hide, they don't see some people want privacy like people like me whose ex might find you come back and beat you up again. Sad
Photographers - can you believe this?

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