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PhilipInCoventry
Holbrooks
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196 of 217  Mon 14th Sep 2020 9:38am  
Moderator: Joined Apr 2010  Total posts:4376

For about half an hour before dawn during moonless periods in September and October annually, the steep morning ecliptic favours the appearance of the zodiacal light in the eastern sky. This is sunlight scattered by interplanetary particles concentrated in the plane of the solar system. During a two-week period that starts just before the September new moon, look above the eastern horizon for a broad wedge of faint light rising from the horizon and centered on the ecliptic (marked by a green line), which extends below Venus toward the bright star Regulus in Leo. Don't confuse the zodiacal light with the Milky Way, which is positioned further to the southeast. Pre dawn Wednesday this week.
Astronomy & Outer Space
Heathite
Coventry
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197 of 217  Mon 14th Sep 2020 12:35pm  
Member: Joined Aug 2012  Total posts:690

Headed for the Moon?
Astronomy & Outer Space
Heathite
Coventry
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198 of 217  Tue 15th Sep 2020 9:45am  
Member: Joined Aug 2012  Total posts:690

Now going into hiding Thumbs up
Astronomy & Outer Space
PhilipInCoventry
Holbrooks
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199 of 217  Tue 15th Sep 2020 5:59pm  
Moderator: Joined Apr 2010  Total posts:4376

Hi all, I like the expression of opinions, I express mine from time to time, but in doing so, please remember others might not share your or my opinion. That's a huge value of our Historic Coventry Forum. One of our moderators needed to ask recently for posted conversations to be cooled. Behaving sensibly means that even difficult subjects can be shared, as long as we are not causing insult to anyone else, whether they are posting on the forum or just reading. I mention this on this topic, as few topics have such controversial issues, fraught with opinions as different as chalk & cheese. I cannot leave food out, hey MR!
Astronomy & Outer Space
Midland Red
Cherwell
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200 of 217  Tue 15th Sep 2020 6:19pm  
Moderator: Joined Jan 2010  Total posts:5639

You mentioned Milky Way, yesterday, Philip - the sweet you can eat between meals Lol
Astronomy & Outer Space
PhilipInCoventry
Holbrooks
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201 of 217  Tue 15th Sep 2020 6:23pm  
Moderator: Joined Apr 2010  Total posts:4376

I could be about to share my opinions on recent news reports about bacteria in the atmosphere of Venus, but breathe a sigh of relief. That might be for another day. What's intriguing me is the recent revelations regards black holes. I don't mean our old coal house. When the tangible evidence of black holes was first mooted in scientific publications, they were described as existing at the outer limits of the universe. We are now told that they, many of them, are actually in our own galaxy. That when two are close together, that they produce a joining flux, that was described in one paper, resembling a tornado. In that flux-tube, which is moving around like the tail of a scorpion, anything that is close by, many of the known stable characteristics like time, state of matter & so on are not stable. Many of the controversial ideas of Dr Velikovsky look very interesting. I just wonder.
Astronomy & Outer Space
Helen F
Warrington
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202 of 217  Tue 15th Sep 2020 7:04pm  
Moderator: Joined Mar 2013  Total posts:2286

Off topic They did tell whoppers back then MR. Lol I always preferred a Mars Bar and would carefully eat the bottom before savouring the much thicker and more solid caramel and chocolate top than today's version. It resulted in such stickiness, that I could have been stuck on a car rear window like a mascot. "Topic", that was another chocolate bar that isn't as good for you as the adverts pretended. On topic I'm not sure that I've ever seen the Milky Way. I've always lived in areas with high light pollution and when I was elsewhere, I forgot to look. Sad Philip, I don't think that possible bacteria on Venus has much scope for heated comments. It's certainly easier to understand than black holes. Now favourite choccy bars, that might be a very fraught subject.
Astronomy & Outer Space
PhilipInCoventry
Holbrooks
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203 of 217  Wed 16th Sep 2020 9:54am  
Moderator: Joined Apr 2010  Total posts:4376

Hi Helen, Hi MR, I wonder what savoury delight could be called a black hole! Maybe we should ask the Cadbury Mash advert creatures? We must be a very "primitive people" they said. Cadbury Mash Advert. Milky Way Advert
Astronomy & Outer Space
pixrobin
Canley
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204 of 217  Wed 16th Sep 2020 12:08pm  
Member: Joined Mar 2014  Total posts:1147

Do you believe in coincidences? The year was 1947. Some of you will recall that on July 8, 1947, 70 + years ago, numerous witnesses claim that an Unidentified Flying Object (UFO) with five aliens aboard, crashed onto a sheep and mule ranch just outside of Roswell, New Mexico. This is a well known incident that many say has long been covered up by the US Airforce, as well as other Federal Agencies and organisations. However, what you may NOT know is that during the month of April, year 1948, nine months after the historic day, the following people were born: Mike Pence, Donald Trump and Mitch McConnell. This is the obvious consequence of aliens breeding with sheep and jackasses. I truly hope this bit of information clears up a lot of things for you.
Astronomy & Outer Space
Rob Orland
205 of 217  Wed 16th Sep 2020 4:58pm  
Off-topic / chat  

Slim
Another Coventry kid
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206 of 217  Wed 16th Sep 2020 7:25pm  
Member: Joined Mar 2013  Total posts:752

On 16th Sep 2020 12:08pm, pixrobin said: Do you believe in coincidences? The year was 1947. Some of you will recall that on July 8, 1947, 70 + years ago, numerous witnesses claim that an Unidentified Flying Object (UFO) with five aliens aboard, crashed onto a sheep and mule ranch just outside of Roswell, New Mexico. This is a well known incident that many say has long been covered up by the US Airforce, as well as other Federal Agencies and organisations.
Well, Mr Mainwaring, I've seen the film Alien Autopsy, so that proves it's true.
Astronomy & Outer Space
PhilipInCoventry
Holbrooks
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207 of 217  Sat 19th Sep 2020 9:24pm  
Moderator: Joined Apr 2010  Total posts:4376

Evening all. With all the gloom & doom around, providing we don't catch pneumonia from getting too cold outside, at least looking at the sky is free of legislation.. Having mentioned the constellation Orion, now becoming visible before sunrise (weather permitting), for anyone unfamiliar, picture four bright stars making a big oblong, then in the middle are three stars in a row, then just below them is a fuzzy star cluster, which includes a huge nebula. I've found an enhanced image of the constellation. A glorious photo of the nebula recorded on a 200 inch telescope. I will share some mind blowing facts about the stars making up this constellation in the days to come. I do miss Sir Patrick Moore for bringing this science to my level.
Astronomy & Outer Space
PhilipInCoventry
Holbrooks
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208 of 217  Sat 19th Sep 2020 9:50pm  
Moderator: Joined Apr 2010  Total posts:4376

Just yatter, Please don't be bullied about the subject. Most of us know that our earth globe is divided into segments for map references. Latitude & longitude. Astronomers divided the sky in the same way. It's called Right Ascension & Declination. I will explain right ascension another day as it's a measurement involving time, but declination is easier as it is like earth latitude. Those familiar with geometry might be able to work out why we viewing from Coventry can never see the Southern Cross, that our friends down under can see. Just as they cannot see the Plough, Ursa Major. It all depends on the declination.
Astronomy & Outer Space
Helen F
Warrington
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209 of 217  Sat 19th Sep 2020 10:07pm  
Moderator: Joined Mar 2013  Total posts:2286

Ah, Orion. I confess to having a soft spot for Betelgeuse. The home of Ford Prefect and Zaphod Beeblebrox
Astronomy & Outer Space
PhilipInCoventry
Holbrooks
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210 of 217  Sat 19th Sep 2020 10:21pm  
Moderator: Joined Apr 2010  Total posts:4376

Hi Helen, Betelgeuse, the orange blob in the picture, is so huge, that if it was at the centre of our solar system, ie where our sun is, its mass would envelope our planet earth.
Astronomy & Outer Space

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