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Rev S H Widdrington

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Frances
Kenilworth
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1 of 4  Wed 29th Jan 2014 3:43pm  
Member: Joined Jan 2014  Total posts:19

Hello. Can anybody help me. My name is Frances. I have recently retired and have just finished an MA. My thesis was 'How the Introduction and Development of the Bicycle Industry Brought Hope to a City in Despair : Coventry 1860-1890.' As I was researching this subject, I came across the name of the Rev. S H Widdrington but could not find out anything about him apart from the fact that he was vicar of St Michael's Church, Coventry and there is a road in Coventry named Widdrington Road. Many thanks. Frances
Frances Diana Warr

Rev S H Widdrington
deanocity3
keresley
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2 of 4  Wed 29th Jan 2014 4:46pm  
Member: Joined Nov 2013  Total posts:358

more info here
Rev S H Widdrington
mcsporran
Coventry & Cebu
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3 of 4  Wed 29th Jan 2014 9:12pm  
Member: Joined Oct 2013  Total posts:406

There are quite a number of references in the Google Books archive including this.
Rev S H Widdrington
heritage
Bedworth
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4 of 4  Thu 30th Jan 2014 8:54am  
Member: Joined Sep 2011  Total posts:374

He was heavily involved with the plight of the ribbon weavers after the Cobden treaty of 1860 and the collapse of the trade. His name was to be found in many newspaper reports of the time. Examples below. EXTRACT FROM THE COVENTRY HERALD AND OBSERVER, FRIDAY February 18TH 1863 REPORT OF THE EMIGRATION COMMITTEE The following Report was laid before the Relief Committee last Friday, February 6th:- The Emigration Committee beg to lay before the General Committee the following Report. The members of the City of Coventry Relief Committee will remember that at meetings held on 26th of December 1862, and 2nd January, 1863, the following resolutions were passed:- 1st - That to meet the munificent offer of 100 free passages to Queensland, made by the Government of that colony, a sum not to exceed £500 be appropriated for the outfit, Railway fare, &c. of the emigrants. 2nd - That the Emigration Committee consist of nine members, three to to be a quorum. 3rd - That the Mayor, the Revds. S.H. Widdrington, W. Drake, W.L. Clay G. Tabberer, Messrs. W. Lynes, A.H. Pears, H. Soden, and E.H. Crutchlow, do form the Emigration Committee. In consequence of these resolutions, the Emigration Committee sat from time to time, and out of nearly 500 applicants selected about 250, a list of whose names, with the necessary comments thereupon, they submitted to Mr. Jordan, the Emigration Commissioner of the Queensland Government. Out of this list about 130 souls, equal to 100 statute adults, were chosen by Mr. Jordan. Some alterations were afterwards unavoidably made, but eventually 24 families and 7 single women, in all 129 persons, left Coventry on Saturday, January 31st, as emigrants for Brisbane. Of the 129 persons thus sent out, 57 were dependent on the parish for support, 2 (single women) were maintained by their friends, 37 were in receipt of aid from the Relief Fund, and 33 were at the time of their selection in work. But of this 33, 14 had already been, and would inevitably have again become, recipients of parish relief, and the remaining 19 had all at various times been pensioners on the Relief Fund. Only one family had of late earned wages adequate for their support, and even this family had been sadly reduced in their circumstances. In the course of their proceedings the Committee have seen many evidences of the intensity of the late distress. Many families had not a rag of clothing fit to take with them. Some had to borrow a portion of the clothes in which they appeared before the Committee. Twelve wives, out of the twenty-four who went, had sold or pawned their wedding rings. Very few of the children born since the distress began had been baptised. EXTRACT FROM THE COVENTRY HERALD & OBSERVER JULY 27th 1860 THE STRIKE IN THE RIBBON TRADE We regret to say that affairs remain in much the same state this week as during the previous fortnight, on neither side does there seem the slightest disposition to give way. The well-intentioned effort of Mr. Widdrington has failed, as will be seen on reference to our report of the proceedings at the Corn Exchange, on Wednesday evening. The weavers have, however, agreed to a resolution which, if acted upon, may have some effect in altering the present position of the dispute. They have determined to draw up a new List of Prices, and the hands of every manufacturer who may sign this document will at once return to work. How far this course will meet the approval of the manufacturers, it is impossible to say; but in the transition state of the trade, we doubt whether it will be very generally accepted. Meanwhile, the distress is frightful, and increases daily. At a meeting of the Relief Committee, held on Monday, it was found that the funds were nearly exhausted, but several members gave fresh subscriptions, and it was determined to distribute bread to the value of £50, to morrow (Saturday.) We give below Reports of the proceedings during the week.
Rev S H Widdrington

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