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Coventry's Markets

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Prof
Gloucester
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136 of 146  Thu 4th Oct 2018 8:49am  
Member: Joined Jul 2014  Total posts:1494

Although I do have a memory of the Market Square (though at the time had no idea it was called that and probably thought of it as West Orchard Market) but much more I remember the Barracks market, where friends of ours had a stall, and the man at the china stall shouted out his wares! Edited by member, 4th Oct 2018 5:32 pm
Local History and Heritage - Coventry's Markets
Kaga simpson
Peacehaven, East Sussex
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137 of 146  Mon 12th Nov 2018 3:12pm  
Member: Joined Sep 2014  Total posts:3746

Around 1830 time Coventry was a city and a county, and the police force had to go to places like Ansty, Wyken and Whitley and such villages as there was no Warwickshire force. At that time there were day constables and night watchmen - there was a setter of the watch, and the watchmen met at the watch house and started their rounds at 10pm. On their beats watch-boxes were placed for them to rest in, constructed like sentry boxes but with doors to their openings. The old lock-up or watch-house in the Women's Market was taken down in 1865 to make way for the new market hall. On the one side it adjoined an old inn (Talbot) and its yard, which stood on the corner of West Orchard and Cross Chesping. The old night watchmen cried the hours and half-hours throughout the night. The Women's Market adjoined the watch-house, it was one storey, covered with a tiled roof, and open on three sides to wind and rain - it stood on 14 brick pillars. Here on market days sat the farmers' wives with butter, eggs and farm produce. The inspector trying the weight of the butter with his scales placed a constable at each end of the market, to prevent them running away if they had short weight. But they would slip through the back way to the Dolphin Inn. The butter sold by the quart (two and a half pounds weight), but in 1839 the council made them sell in pounds and ounces. The sheds or shambles around the market hall were small with a frontage of about 8 to 9 feet, 7 feet tall. and different trades - erected in 1829 to give more stalls to the market, the hall having been erected before that date. Each shed had a door and a wooden window flap on hinges, made to let down to form a stall
Local History and Heritage - Coventry's Markets
Helen F
Warrington
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138 of 146  Tue 13th Nov 2018 12:39pm  
Moderator: Joined Mar 2013  Total posts:2329

Forum library image Thanks for the details Kaga, I'd wondered when the sheds were built. You can just see them in the picture above on the left. There's another batch of sheds on the other side of the old market 'hall'. and more to the right of the photographer, leading to Broadgate. The hall at the time of the photograph was open on all 4 sides. The market area itself was relatively new as the original markets were in Broadgate itself and the women's market was behind one of the buildings on Butcher Row, but the covered hall was certainly there on the 1750 Bradford map so I'm not sure when it was created. The map seems to show a door and windows at the south end. Given your description of it being open on three sides, it seems that there might have been a building at the south end of the market hall (front of the photo), although it couldn't have been very big. There was a pub adjoining the watch house (back left of photo), at the entrance to the market but by the time I have any information for it, it was the Spread Eagle but that had previously moved from further down West Orchard and then moved back before the new market was built (confusing or what?). The Talbot Inn was a very iconic place that most know of as being on the corner of Cross Cheaping and West Orchard, although in 1850 West Orchard was narrower and there was an additional building on the corner. I recon it would have looked very similar to the Talbot Inn but possibly without the iconic jettied window. Adjacent to and within the market there were numerous pubs, many of which had back entries, accessible from the market. I imagine the problem was not where to find a drink, but who would let you in given what you were wearing and what you smelt of. Oh my Note the original cobbles on the main area of the space. They're random river pebbles, as opposed to the regular square setts you can see near the lamp post, heading off to the right.
Local History and Heritage - Coventry's Markets
Kaga simpson
Peacehaven, East Sussex
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139 of 146  Thu 15th Nov 2018 2:49pm  
Member: Joined Sep 2014  Total posts:3746

Helen A great picture. Those cobbles - the area was paved with "petrified kidneys" which was most unpleasant to walk on in thin-soled boots. The women sat on wooden benches, had their produce on benches in front of them. At that time on the corner of West Orchard opposite the Talbot were Merridew and son of the Herald and Advertiser. The old night watchman passed away and was succeeded by the police force. Yearly came round the 'Coventry Statutes'. Held in Broadgate for the hiring of servants, it was done away with mid-1850s. The male servants stood in a row on the west side of Broadgate, and the females on the same side but nearer the City Hotel. Ox roasting in the Dolphin Yard at the statutes was an institution.
Local History and Heritage - Coventry's Markets
Prof
Gloucester
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140 of 146  Sun 16th Jun 2019 2:42pm  
Member: Joined Jul 2014  Total posts:1494

A corner of the market many will remember. Forum library image
Local History and Heritage - Coventry's Markets
Prof
Gloucester
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141 of 146  Sat 23rd Nov 2019 10:18pm  
Member: Joined Jul 2014  Total posts:1494

Busy Market Square Forum library image
Local History and Heritage - Coventry's Markets
NeilsYard
Coventry
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142 of 146  Tue 7th Jan 2020 9:41am  
Member: Joined Aug 2010  Total posts:2692

As its been mentioned on here a few times - some interesting images here from inside the Godiva clock of Loseby's original Market Tower Clock mechanism. They've been around for a while but The Telegraph have updated the album recently - probably as repairs were needed as Godiva was stuck outside in the cold a week or so ago! Edited by member, 7th Jan 2020 9:42 am
Local History and Heritage - Coventry's Markets
crossh9
Warwickshire
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143 of 146  Mon 25th May 2020 7:53pm  
Member: Joined Nov 2013  Total posts:10

Samuel Corbett was my great grandfather and resided at 22 Smithford Street and then in Earlsdon until his death in 1942. He was a third generation of Samuel Corbetts in Coventry, he also made and fitted the clock at the entrance to the London Road Cemetery. He was never told that it was going to be demolished xx
Local History and Heritage - Coventry's Markets
Kaga simpson
Peacehaven, East Sussex
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144 of 146  Mon 22nd Jun 2020 10:07am  
Member: Joined Sep 2014  Total posts:3746

Let’s step farther back in time! The priory of St Mary in Coventry had a market in the town, against the chief gate of the castle of the Earl of Chester in Cross-cheaping, as early as the 13 century, a market for cattle, pigs and possibly wool. Up to about 1850 there was an annual cheese fair by farmers from Warwickshire, held in Broadgate. the cheeses laid on straw on the pavement in rows, in stacks, three to five in a stack. Here the old-fashioned Warwickshire cheese, rich and crumbling, was cut and sold. The quality varied greatly (oh for a chunk of bread and a beer). The cheeses were about five to six inches thick and from twenty to twenty four inches in diameter, from dairies 20 to 40 cows each producing on average 3cwt of cheese. The cheese, in proper time, proper warmth, well cleaned and kept warm till dry and yellow cast and when a year old will coat of yellowish-brown-red colour, well tasty, cuts flaky, gorgeous taste and flavoured, good and rich. When moved to the market hall it faded out.
Local History and Heritage - Coventry's Markets
Prof
Gloucester
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145 of 146  Sat 15th Aug 2020 9:56pm  
Member: Joined Jul 2014  Total posts:1494

Coventry’s circular market, but those stallholder signs the same as in Barracks market!
Local History and Heritage - Coventry's Markets
PeterB
Mount Nod
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146 of 146  Tue 18th Aug 2020 4:48pm  
Member: Joined May 2014  Total posts:333

Some of the stallholder signs are still there. I never realised they were so old.
Local History and Heritage - Coventry's Markets

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