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Kaga simpson
Peacehaven, East Sussex
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661 of 680  Tue 4th Feb 2020 10:03am  
Member: Joined Sep 2014  Total posts:3325

Oh Helen, please. I have a bit more savvy than that. I saw some of the German photographs, I flew in a bomber over Coventry, there’s not much I didn't know about that sort of thing. I was flying over Coventry at 15, having landmarks pointed out. I was trained to drop in enemy country, find my way about, I was given the full works at its highest level. Now, despite what you all say, that photo of Neil’s I first talked about was a good way from both old and new Fairfax Street. Now, what was your problem about the fire station? New Buildings was there long, long before the fire station. Never heard of it as a problem till 1936.
Our Kaga
Kaga simpson
Peacehaven, East Sussex
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662 of 680  Tue 4th Feb 2020 10:16am  
Member: Joined Sep 2014  Total posts:3325

Dreamtime, No, not too many films, there were a large number of cardboard collapsible tanks, boats, placed in wrong places, even a dead body in the wrong place, with briefcase attached to wrist, with plans - there was nothing we didn't do to fool the enemy.
Our Kaga
Wearethemods
Aberdeenshire
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663 of 680  Tue 4th Feb 2020 10:47am  
Member: Joined Jun 2013  Total posts:455

On 3rd Feb 2020 4:46pm, Dreamtime said: Kaga, Is there anything you can tell us about the fake cut out tanks that were placed in various locations to fox the enemy, or have I been watching too many movies.
Hi Dreamtime. Prior to Kaga replying, the only ones I've ever seen in old newsreels were the inflatable tanks & lorries placed strategically in fields near the South Coast/Dover, which were there to fool the enemy aerial spotters into believing we were going to invade at the Calais peninsula. I'd never heard of them being so far inland as the Midlands. By 1944, bombing raids by aircraft on the UK mainland were over then. The emphasis had changed to the 'vengeance' weapons which had a limited range.
Our Kaga
Helen F
Warrington
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664 of 680  Tue 4th Feb 2020 12:16pm  
Moderator: Joined Mar 2013  Total posts:1834

On 4th Feb 2020 10:03am, Kaga simpson said: Oh Helen, please. I have a bit more savvy than that. I saw some of the German photographs, I flew in a bomber over Coventry, there’s not much I didn't know about that sort of thing. I was flying over Coventry at 15, having landmarks pointed out. I was trained to drop in enemy country, find my way about, I was given the full works at its highest level. Now, despite what you all say, that photo of Neil’s I first talked about was a good way from both old and new Fairfax Street. Now, what was your problem about the fire station? New Buildings was there long, long before the fire station. Never heard of it as a problem till 1936.
I wasn't suggesting that you didn't know about the German photography, but other people read this too and I was just making a comment. Smile Neil's aerial photo was quite a long way from all the locations as it was taken from a plane. The original shows a lot more of the city centre. Neil had cropped the photo to show the electricity substation near the baths, which was his item of interest. Yes, that cropped version wasn't looking directly at either the old Fairfax Street or the location of the new one, it was Pool Meadow. However the substation was photographed in colour from the new Fairfax Street, which caused Neil to mislabel the topic he put it into. People on here know the city as it is now, not necessarily as it was in your day. The city is very different from the past. Confusion results. I don't have a problem with the fire station. I was merely observing that the central entrance and the 3 right hand engine bays were built before the other 3 fire engine bays were added to the left. I hadn't noticed that before. New Buildings was indeed there before the fire station although that wasn't always its name. It dates back to the original priory.
Our Kaga
Kaga simpson
Peacehaven, East Sussex
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665 of 680  Tue 4th Feb 2020 12:18pm  
Member: Joined Sep 2014  Total posts:3325

Helen Wondering if you were referring to Pool Meadow and the river, think they had trouble sometime 1954/5, had to retunnel I believe.
Our Kaga
Helen F
Warrington
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666 of 680  Tue 4th Feb 2020 1:07pm  
Moderator: Joined Mar 2013  Total posts:1834

I'm not surprised. The river was covered over and built on in random sections. I can imagine that bombing went right through to the tunnels in places. At any time after that, bits of it could have failed. Or maybe it was just poor construction to start with? The Radford Brook from the Burges to New Buildings was culverted in the early part of the 1800s, after they had drained the Priory Mill Pond (became the Cattle Market). The Sherbourne was covered over at some point in the late 1800s between Palmer Lane and New Buildings. The stretch between New Buildings and Priory Street was covered over in the 1920s/1930s. Most of the river has been buried over the years. Quite a lot was built over by the Ring Road. Sad
Our Kaga
Dreamtime
Perth Western Australia
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667 of 680  Tue 4th Feb 2020 3:08pm  
Member: Joined Jan 2010  Total posts:3416

Kaga, Wearethemods, thanks for your response. I could see Dad's Army feeling very confident using such a tactic. Lol
Our Kaga
Kaga simpson
Peacehaven, East Sussex
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668 of 680  Thu 6th Feb 2020 2:13pm  
Member: Joined Sep 2014  Total posts:3325

Dreamtime. Did you watch those ‘Mission Impossible’ films? Another spin off from WWII. Three of us dressed in secondhand civvy clothes, no money, no identification, given three words as clues of destination, a fourth word the name of man - four words, two minutes to memorise. Then, “Gentlemen, your mission, to locate, receive message from fourth word man, and deliver back here in 48 hours”. Words set on fire. “The army disowns you for 48 hours, whatever trouble you may be in, good luck”. Two of us returned on time with message.
Our Kaga
Dreamtime
Perth Western Australia
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669 of 680  Fri 7th Feb 2020 6:06am  
Member: Joined Jan 2010  Total posts:3416

Yes Kaga, till Tom Cruise came along, then that put me off. "Bond, James Bond" is more up my street. Why are all these special agents so short? Cool
Our Kaga
Kaga simpson
Peacehaven, East Sussex
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670 of 680  Wed 12th Feb 2020 2:38pm  
Member: Joined Sep 2014  Total posts:3325

1927 the first automatic telephone opened in London, the first telephone and wireless between London and new York. So, the BBC decided to try and broadcast rugby and football matches, and having experimented unsuccessfully with the Derby in '26 were keen to make a successful job of a Major Horse Race, the Grand National, so the sporting life commentator (A. Good) to the king were engaged along with another BBC man named G. Allison. This held the attention and excitement of the Country. My Parents, awaiting me, father hoping for a boy, backed a horse Bright Boy. Allison's role was to describe the scenes before and after the race. This time Good was in charge of the race. The year previous... 'Here they come now they're getting down to it - it's sure to be - no it's not it's... and so on (disaster). Good, nervous before the race, the king sitting next to him, it was impossible to spot all the fallers from the stands. Only seven finished, but Good was sending waves of excitement into 10 million homes, nothing like this had ever happened before in their lives. Good spotted the superb jump of Sprig at the canal turn on the last circuit, into the lead, friends with the jockey, he could not help but say into the microphone; 'Come on Ted you can win this'. His words went out as Bright Boy and Sprig jumped the last fence. The roar of the crowd drowned Good's last words from the Daventry transmitter. The broadcast relied on five microphones, one in the private stand, with the king at his shoulder, one hung in front of Good to pick up the cheers of the crowd, a third for Allison to comment on scenes in the paddock, a fourth in the unsaddling enclosure, and a fifth to interview the winning jockey. After 62 minutes on the air the race broadcast was declared a huge success. Bright Boy was placed second, a role I followed.
Our Kaga
Kaga simpson
Peacehaven, East Sussex
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671 of 680  Thu 13th Feb 2020 1:05pm  
Member: Joined Sep 2014  Total posts:3325

During my childhood there were no paperback books as such, only trashy, lurid and crude, not what parents bought children. The hardbacks were too expensive for the working class - we had two - one a war book for dad and one Aesops fables for us kids. Both were about 10x7 inches, three inches thick and very heavy. We used them as weights to stick things down on occasions. We also bought Rupert, Brer Rabbit and such in hardback. I was about 10/11 when an Aunt said 'Woolies' are selling books for sixpence, so I raced to Smithford street, a firm called Penguin, the books a different colour for fiction, crime etc. During the war they became popular. I read a couple down the shelter and became a fan of D. H. Lawrence, but one book was banned in the UK - 'Lady Chatterley's Lover'. I had bought one in S. France in '45. Written in Italy, I paid a visit to the cottage on the lake in '54. At the end of the war 'Penguin' began to publish the 'classics' for about three shillings each. But it wasn't till 1960 that they published Lady Chatterley's Lover, and challenged the 'Obscene Law' and won.
Our Kaga
Kaga simpson
Peacehaven, East Sussex
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672 of 680  Tue 18th Feb 2020 10:14am  
Member: Joined Sep 2014  Total posts:3325

I feel very fortunate to have been born in Coventry. The green fields, woods and streams surrounding it I believe gave the people a friendly nature, honest and humorous, romantic and generous. Built on sloping hills, its 19th century shops and houses were either step up or step down and low beams - this allowed gentlemen to offer an arm to assist the ladies, bringing forth a smile and a nod. The old quaint houses had charm, nooks and crannies inside and out, couple of wooden panelled steps up or down into small rooms. This may have held classic, ancient books, or sketches and paintings of Coventry's mills or ponds. The butchers next door with it's poultry and rabbits hanging outside, interlaced with mint to keep it sweet. Birds in cages singing, the scent of bread and cakes all wafting in the air. Every shop a different scent, a real pleasure. Shops that wound through a maze of rooms, stepping up there stepping down here, dodging a low beam now and then, all helped to make it worthwhile. Goods laid out in trays, baskets, baths, trinkets on the walls - there was no ending to the array. One never got tired of shopping, or just mooching around. Tea and sugar you could buy loose, blackberry jam and blackberry wine, centuries old home made pills and lotions, rosemary for medicinal lavender for bath oil, angelica for flatulence, its seeds dried and burnt perfumed the shop. A huge jug with a watering rose in its side, forebear of our watering can, stood near the door. All this stood close to the old Priory, with its herb beds and healing powers.
Our Kaga
Helen F
Warrington
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673 of 680  Tue 18th Feb 2020 11:18am  
Moderator: Joined Mar 2013  Total posts:1834

Thankyou for your very atmospheric memories. Invaluable. I wish that I could video them... well, the ones for family viewing.
Our Kaga
Dreamtime
Perth Western Australia
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674 of 680  Tue 18th Feb 2020 2:30pm  
Member: Joined Jan 2010  Total posts:3416

Kaga, sounds like anywhere in Warwickshire to me. My father's pub, The Wheatsheaf, in Titchmarsh was like that. Most of the rooms either stepped up or stepped down with a little painted sign - mind your head. It used to be a coach house originally and during the 60's there was a family butchers operating in one of the outer buildings. The best sausages on earth. (in my opinion). Cheers
Our Kaga
Prof
Gloucester
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675 of 680  Thu 20th Feb 2020 4:30pm  
Member: Joined Jul 2014  Total posts:1231

Dream, did you ever have Isherwood's sausage from their shop near the Forum on Walsgrave Road? Rob and I know how good they were?
Our Kaga

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