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Dreamtime
Perth Western Australia
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676 of 685  Fri 21st Feb 2020 12:44pm  
Member: Joined Jan 2010  Total posts:3471

Good Evening Prof, Not had that pleasure having lived the other side of town. I believe you though, we all have our favourite 'foodie places'. My other favourite, dare I say 'take away' was Pickin's for the pork and stuffing batches, only on rare occasions though if we were near on a late Sat. night. I can almost taste them now. Having to watch my waistline these days and what little I do fancy does not do me good. !
Our Kaga
Kaga simpson
Peacehaven, East Sussex
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677 of 685  Fri 21st Feb 2020 1:46pm  
Member: Joined Sep 2014  Total posts:3393

By Feb/March 1945 we knew the Germans were beaten, it was a matter of days, and we would celebrate the victory. But in Coventry people started to get jittery. The Gov't had promised the servicemen they would all get their jobs back but the work-places were already filled. On top of that your fathers and Coventry people feared the end of the war would see mass un-employment, tanks, guns and planes would no longer be needed. They saw the return of the poverty and dole queues of the 20s/30s. The idea of package holidays, air flights, television, etc., had not even entered people's vision. As for you lot coming along and wanting cars, that we couldn't have envisaged - we hadn't come around to Billy Butlin yet. So in the summer we had an election, Labour promised free medical, houses, end of food shortages, full employment and a host of other things, and we jumped on the bandwagon. They won in a landslide, surprising the big three war lords. But there was a bigger evil out there, and we hadn't even beaten Japan yet. By autumn, thousands were dying of starvation and the sickness it created in Germany every week, so well had we destroyed their infrastructure, their men, most of their buildings, and only the U.K. and the U.S. could save them. The darkness, the drabness, the makeshift meals, the depressing, never ending days would go on. We were broke, we couldn't afford to buy from the U.S., and they were shrieking about a loan as well. So the new Gov't had to announce a further cut in our rations, nearly half again - meat, butter, sugar, soap. And rice disappeared altogether. Bread had never been rationed - only a shortage when flour didn't arrive, but the new minister for food cut the 1lb loaf down to 14 ounces and kept the price the same, hoping to fool the British people. The scandal leaked and he was transferred to another ministry. Yes the bread was traced directly to Germany. Yes, we saved the German people in the British Zone.
Our Kaga
Kaga simpson
Peacehaven, East Sussex
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678 of 685  Sat 22nd Feb 2020 11:57am  
Member: Joined Sep 2014  Total posts:3393

The end of the war and a million headaches the Gov't hadn't thought of, they had no clear idea of what they should do. The big three divided up Germany into three zones, food supplies almost wiped out by the bombing, but the allies firmly believed in collective guilt. The people remaining were managers, skilled engineers, etc., but after so many years the allies thought they were nazi or nazi sympathisers, and so imprisoned them, awaiting sentence. But they had to release some of them for Germany to start to regain their economy, for they couldn't afford to mantain them for ever.
Our Kaga
Kaga simpson
Peacehaven, East Sussex
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679 of 685  Mon 24th Feb 2020 3:30pm  
Member: Joined Sep 2014  Total posts:3393

WATER is the most precious thing to man, and Coventry had none, apart from rainfall. Coventry wasn't threatened by the sea or large river. The lowest part of Coventry, St John's church, was 260 feet above sea level. Coventry relied solely on rainfall to fill the wells, for almost every summer the wells ran dry. The woods and fields around formed little channels during heavy rain. On the north-west side they criss-crossed the area they joined and formed two major brooks - Spon End and Radford brooks - eventually becoming the Sherbourne river to run to the east. So low was the water in the summer there were scores of fords, including Spon-ford. But man/monks threw weirs across the brooks at Spon End and Hales Street, creating sheets of water and power. They built water-mills, and manipulated the water. Over time and through storms the weirs were damaged, excess of water could not get away for many hours. (Man-made problem.) Spon bridge was not erected till 1776 after a very disastrous storm. Much pollution was found in the river - old kettles etc. 1769 and the first boats entered the canal basin, but wharves were not solely for coal, almost as many were for water, for the wells had failed again. Water carts sold water to Coventry people. Yes, we never learned, for in 1933 the water carts were out again selling water to Coventry people.
Our Kaga
Kaga simpson
Peacehaven, East Sussex
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680 of 685  Tue 25th Feb 2020 4:36pm  
Member: Joined Sep 2014  Total posts:3393

Saying that, we must remember that winters were more severe 2-3 centuries ago. The great storm of 1800 that did flood Spon End - the year had been perpetual snow, coal supplies had run out, the canal froze, and the freezing wind blew through Feb, March and April. The birds failed to sing, snowdrifts lay in the fields in May, there were frosts in June and floods in July. No wonder that Spon End was under four foot of water and the Ram Bridge swept away. In the north, waters rose fast, looms in houses, mills, weirs, sheep and horses were swept away. In September uncut hay rotted in the fields and unripe wheat blackened. Storms and hail killed geese and pigs. On top of that the gov't passed an act that forbid strike action. and anyone discussing wages or conditions would be prosecuted. And the war with France knocked on the door.
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Kaga simpson
Peacehaven, East Sussex
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681 of 685  Sun 8th Mar 2020 4:48pm  
Member: Joined Sep 2014  Total posts:3393

THE LUNAR MEN.
A bunch of men that met as a club on bright moonlit nights in the eighteenth century, just outside B'ham, for safety from footpads. Pioneers, scientists, medicine, etc., they built factories, canals, steam-engines, new gases, new minerals, new medicines, new powers of invention. Changed England forever, and made Coventry an industrial city.
Our Kaga
Kaga simpson
Peacehaven, East Sussex
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682 of 685  Tue 17th Mar 2020 9:40am  
Member: Joined Sep 2014  Total posts:3393

Helen mentioned Pompeii as, I believe, an historical 'dig' site. Pompeii was covered by ash from Mount Vesuvius, but what you may not know: 1944: 75,000 troops took part in the battle of Monte Casino over three months. 55,000 allied casualties, 20,000 German casualties. Most lay some twenty or so miles behind the lines waiting for shipment out of the war. But smoke and fumes began to appear above Mount Vesuvius - these got stronger until it looked likely that an eruption would overwhelm the soldiers, like it had Pompeii, although fifty miles away. Quite nervy for helpless soldiers.
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Helen F
Warrington
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683 of 685  Tue 17th Mar 2020 11:09am  
Moderator: Joined Mar 2013  Total posts:1947

I was aware that it had erupted about that time but I never thought it being part of the war. I think that there's a picture of a tank with lava in the background? I could be wrong.
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dougie
from Wigan
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684 of 685  Tue 17th Mar 2020 12:18pm  
Member: Joined Dec 2010  Total posts:250

Good read these last few posts, thanks all. We've been to all the places mentioned plus others in that area, we also had the chance to book a special guide for only 10 people at an extra cost (it's well worth the extra if you ever get that chance), they give full history and answer any questions, places Pompeii, Rome, Pisa, Monte Casino. In Rome I was the only one she took into the church with having a video recorder as it was closed to the public - reason, I had said I was making the video for everyone on the coach.
Our Kaga
Kaga simpson
Peacehaven, East Sussex
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685 of 685  Tue 24th Mar 2020 3:15pm  
Member: Joined Sep 2014  Total posts:3393

It was Oct 1971 when the first casino opened in Brighton, called 'The Sergeant York' and I had a membership card, only because I owned a guesthouse - there were some very strict rules when they first opened. The big doors had a small flap, you showed your card and the door opened, and you walked in through a pair of heavy curtains, into a plush vestibule. A big heavy bouncer looked me over, then let me through another set of plush red curtains into another vestibule with a counter and about 6 or 7 Bunny type girls. One checked me in, one sidled up to me and said “Have you ever played roulette sir? Would you like me to show you around, and the rules etc?” I had played roulette in Cannes, Lyon, and Ostend and on a solitary table in a shady night club illegally in Brighton, way back in the fifties. She was a real doll, so I thought I'd keep her by my side awhile. The room held five roulette tables only, no backgammon, no one-arm bandits, no cards. She tried to explain the wheel and the chips, but I was well ahead of her in knowledge, and the free drinks and service. This didn't mean you could date the girls, that also was against the rules, in fear it would be called a call girl establishment. Gambling is about mathematics and whoever devised the roulette wheel was a genius, but there are only two places that you can cover five numbers with three chips and that helps. Now punters have complained, and Ladbrokes have changed the wheel sequence and the odds - no longer roulette. In 1994 my membership card number went into a raffle - the first three raffle tickets, the third had 100, the second (me) 150 and the first had 250 tickets on the first ever National Lottery. At television time the three of us were called into an office to hear the results. My little friend with the large boobs sidled up to me, she would help me check my numbers. No one won big numbers, I won four third prizes £10 - £40. The management was hoping for a big prize for publicity, we were paid out in 'chips'. I placed five chips down her cleavage and went back to the tables.
Our Kaga

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