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dougie
from Wigan
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1 of 10  Sun 7th Jun 2015 8:33am  
Member: Joined Dec 2010  Total posts:234

I've been reading through the history of Coventry on this link and was wondering why I've never seen any signs like this one on Holyhead Road or London Road in Coventry or have I missed them, I've seen them on other parts of the country on the old coaching road Smile it also says the road ran through the centre of your city Edited by member, 7th Jun 2015 8:36 am
Old coaching roads
Norman Conquest
Allesley
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2 of 10  Sun 7th Jun 2015 9:59am  
Member: Joined Oct 2014  Total posts:851

You have never seen them, dougie, because there aren't any. The only acknowledgement to coaching that I know is the Phantom Coach pub. It has a rather strange tale attached. I don't know who is responsible for erecting brown signs.
Just old and knackered

Old coaching roads
NeilsYard
Coventry
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3 of 10  Sun 7th Jun 2015 11:23am  
Member: Joined Aug 2010  Total posts:1499

I guess the Tollgate Pub is about as close as we can get in Cov.
Old coaching roads
dougie
from Wigan
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Thread starter
4 of 10  Sun 7th Jun 2015 2:21pm  
Member: Joined Dec 2010  Total posts:234

Coventry should also show the signs. Is it not a part of the history of the city if other places show them just for the road? As by the 12th century streets ran out of the town to the north, east, south-west and possibly south-east and all, except the southern exits, had their suburbs. This suggests that Coventry was already an important road centre, a supposition confirmed by the presence of bars at these exits in the 13th century before the building of the five most important gates there in the 14th century. Certainly by the middle of the 14th century it was the centre of a network of roads linking it with Worcester, Holyhead, Leicester, and London and by the 16th century at the latest the main coach road from London to Holyhead passed through the city.
Old coaching roads
morgana
the secret garden
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5 of 10  Sun 7th Jun 2015 5:14pm  
Member: Joined Nov 2011  Total posts:2371

Kaga, the main coach route from Bedworth into Coventry was Grange Rd, Longford. I am sure Grange Rd was prior named Green Lane, the old road went through Longford Park which it stated a bit of it is still there. I also recently read the coach roads were mainly led on the routes of the toll gates around Coventry. Edited by member, 7th Jun 2015 7:28 pm
Old coaching roads
Norman Conquest
Allesley
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6 of 10  Mon 8th Jun 2015 10:45am  
Member: Joined Oct 2014  Total posts:851

And then of course there is Toll Bar End. I have a gut feeling that somewhere I have seen an engraving of a toll gate at or near the London Rd end of St James Lane. "Toll Bar" - does this refer to a bar placed across the road, to be lifted when a traveller has paid the toll as the "pike" in turnpike?
Just old and knackered

Old coaching roads
morgana
the secret garden
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7 of 10  Mon 8th Jun 2015 1:20pm  
Member: Joined Nov 2011  Total posts:2371

Another coaching road - Allesley Village.
Old coaching roads
Dillotford
Stafford
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8 of 10  Wed 10th Jun 2015 10:55pm  
Member: Joined Dec 2014  Total posts:29

There are some references to Coventry on the London to Dublin mail route: From 5 August 1817 the route was altered to go through Coventry, its route now being Highgate, Barnet, Dunstable, Hockcliffe, Towcester, Daventry, Coventry, B'ham and onto Shrewsbury, previously it went via Oxford. Works to the roads were required to ease the gradients and sharp bends etc. Major construction included two miles of new road to the east and west of Coventry - presumedly this is London and Holyhead Roads.
Old coaching roads
Midland Red

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9 of 10  Fri 27th Nov 2015 11:15am  
Moderator: Joined Jan 2010  Total posts:4153

Norman - copied from History of Willenhall: There was no specific reference in the Middle Ages to London Road, which, by passing through the parish, has always formed its most important feature. The bridges - Willenhall Bridge and Ryton Bridge - by which the road crosses the Sowe and the Avon were mentioned in 1410-11, though not by those names, and there was a family called 'atte Brugge' in the 14th century. By Leland's time (1535-43) there was a stone bridge of five arches at Willenhall. A line of banks west of Dell Close suggests that the stretch of London Road called Weeping Lane ran up from Willenhall Bridge to the east of the present road, and was directly aligned with St. James Lane. The modern course of the road was probably laid out by the turnpike company in 1724. The upkeep of the roads and bridge was a continual problem in the 17th century, disputes arising between the inhabitants and the county concerning responsibility for repairs. The inhabitants of Willenhall were constantly in trouble for not repairing the main road; this road was given various names, including Willenhall Lane, London Road, and Daventry Road. In 1632 there were said to be two highways, that from Coventry to Southam (London Road), and another from Leicester to Warwick; the latter was presumably a route bypassing Coventry through Binley, Willenhall, and Baginton, using St. James Lane, but this is the only reference to it as a highway. There was a toll gate on London Road, after it was turnpiked, near the junction with Brandon Lane at what became known as Tollbar End. The road was considerably improved in 1836, and the gradient of the hill between Willenhall Bridge and Finford Bridge lowered.
Old coaching roads
Dillotford
Stafford
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10 of 10  Sat 5th Dec 2015 9:59pm  
Member: Joined Dec 2014  Total posts:29

I have found where the mail route improvements of early 19th cent were located for the London Road and Holyhead Road. London Road improvement was from Abbey Road to the Red Lion pub, the route before would have used Abbey Road, which was narrow and steep. Holyead Road improvement was from almost the city centre to the current roundabout with Allesley Old Road, which would been the original turnpike route. London Road entered the city via Much Park Street.
Old coaching roads

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