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Annewiggy
Tamworth
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16 of 22  Fri 22nd Dec 2017 11:28am  
Member: Joined Jan 2013  Total posts:1642

Every map online seems to have the border in a different place but I assume that at the time there was a lot of fighting over border lands. This map shows that Mercia covered a large area of the centre of the country and would have included Bolton
Coat of Arms
Spikeymike
Lowestoft
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17 of 22  Sat 28th Dec 2019 11:03pm  
Member: Joined Dec 2016  Total posts:4

On 13th Dec 2016 6:44pm, Helen F said: Hi Spikeymike. The closest I can find is a John Fisher on page 717 of the Antiquities of Warwickshire who lived in Great Packington and died in 1570. Antiquities of Warwickshire There might be something in the library images but they're down at the moment. Edited by member, 13th Dec 2016 6:44 pm
Thank you very much for the reference to Fisher and similar coat of arms. Very interesting. Sounds very likely a distant connection. Sorry for the delay in replying. Mike
Mike

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Spikeymike
Lowestoft
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18 of 22  Sat 28th Dec 2019 11:10pm  
Member: Joined Dec 2016  Total posts:4

On 13th Dec 2016 7:36pm, Annewiggy said: May not be of much help but there may be a little information you don't have. In a Coventry newspaper February 1843 there is an announcement for the wedding on the 9th inst. at Trinity Church, Mr Charles Ladbrooke of Cubbington plumber to Charlotte, 4th daughter of Mr James Hampson of Manchester. Looking at this on Ancestry this James is your umbrella maker. There is also a report in a Coventry paper of James Hampson of Manchester Iron founder at the Bankrupt Court in 1846.
Thank you Anne, This Charlotte is definitely James Hampson's daughter. I am hoping that the iron manufacturer is not the same James Hampson! But you never know. He did have Manchester connections with family. Apologies for the delay in replying. Thanks again. Mike
Mike

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Spikeymike
Lowestoft
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19 of 22  Sat 28th Dec 2019 11:16pm  
Member: Joined Dec 2016  Total posts:4

On 13th Dec 2016 9:10pm, Helen F said: More on the Fishers - Wiki link The Fisher Baronetcy, of Packington Magna in the County of Warwick, was created in the Baronetage of England on 7 December 1622 for Robert Fisher of Packington Hall, Great Packington, Warwickshire. The second Baronet sat as Member of Parliament for Coventry. The third Baronet died without a male heir and the Packington estates passed to his daughter Mary, wife of the Earl of Aylesford. The fourth Baronet died in 1739, when the baronetcy became dormant. An unsuccessful claim was lodged a few years ago. For more information, follow this link. Sir Clement Fisher, Coventry MP 1661-1679
Helen. I am most grateful for your research. I think there may be a link there somewhere. I will just need to go back further in the tree if I can. You have given me some hope. Kind regards Mike
Mike

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Helen F
Warrington
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20 of 22  Sun 29th Dec 2019 11:11am  
Moderator: Joined Mar 2013  Total posts:1830

Hi Mike. I think that the Fisher link is dodgy. While the chevron in the book looks black, on closer inspection it has the markings for vair not sable as in the Fisher wiki page. I know a little more about heraldry than 2016 and I think that the crown with the 4 pearls might signify a baronet rather than an Earl. The shield shape indicates it might be 15th century (1600s). There are be a number of possibilities - Baronets link to Coventry Thomas Norton made a Baronet in 1661 looks like a possibility, although there is no coat of arms for him. It became extinct in 1691, which might explain why it isn't recorded.
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Kaga simpson
Peacehaven, East Sussex
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21 of 22  Mon 30th Dec 2019 5:33pm  
Member: Joined Sep 2014  Total posts:3322

George Coventry, 6th Earl of Coventry, known as Viscount Deerhurst. Tall, handsome, elegant - made him a favourite with the ladies. From a young age he had acquired the taste for ladies, horse racing and cards. He then eloped and married. His father, outraged at his son’s behaviour and embarrassment, banned him from the ancestral home. Further to his anguish and finance, his new wife died in childbirth. His friend, Sir Richard Worsley, was newly married, and invited him to stay at their home on the Isle of Wight. But Sir Richard was unusual - he encouraged Deerhurst to spy on his wife when naked taking a bath. He also encouraged him to make sexual advances to her. Deerhurst became her lover while Sir Richard spied through a keyhole. Years later, in sympathy, he became a witness for her when Sir Richard tried to ruin her and another of her lovers, when she counter-claimed her husband had ignored her for three months when they wed, then threw her in the arms of other men. From then on it became the most scandalous case - 'Lady Worsley' - in history, Meanwhile Deerhurst had a very nasty riding accident that damaged his face and had him wearing a green silk left eye patch. When his father died he became George Coventry, Earl of Coventry.
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Kaga simpson
Peacehaven, East Sussex
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22 of 22  Wed 1st Jan 2020 3:33pm  
Member: Joined Sep 2014  Total posts:3322

The 7th Earl of Coventry to be, the ancestral home was Croome Court in Worcestershire and he regularly visited Lord and Lady Craven at Coombe Abbey, Coventry But the privileged class since birth had been trained to be blind to staff or workers, they only saw people of social standing, when visiting. The average daily wage for a farm worker in the late 18th century was approx 17d (with 240d to £1), that meant 14 men working from dawn to dusk would cost a Earl or Baron £1, but the trousseau with all the jewellery for a lady’s wedding could cost £5,000-£7,000, even in those days. The person who may have earned a little more was possibly the groom of a post-chaise. Tradition had it he would drive a team from astride the lead horse, a very dangerous game - should a strap break or a wheel shatter from a stone then he would most likely be thrown under the flashing hooves. But life was cheap and short.
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