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Eating in the 50s and 60s

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Janey
Keresley
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1 of 17  Thu 26th Nov 2015 8:30pm  
Member: Joined Aug 2014  Total posts:155

I have just come across the following and apologise if food is in another thread but couldn't resist circulating this as it is so true: EATING IN THE FIFTIES and SIXTIES Curry was a surname. A takeaway was a mathematical problem. A pizza was something to do with a leaning tower. All potato chips were plain; the only choice we had as whether to put the salt on or not. Rice was only eaten as a milk pudding. Calamari was called squid and we used it as fish bait. A Big Mac was what we wore when it was raining. Brown bread was something only poor people ate. Oil was for lubricating, fat was for cooking. Tea was made in a teapot using tea leaves. Sugar enjoyed a good press in those days, and was regarded as being white gold. Cubed sugar was regarded as posh. Fish didn't have fingers in those days. Eating raw fish was called poverty, not sushi. None of us had ever heard of yoghurt. Healthy food consisted of anything edible. People who didn't peel potatoes were regarded as lazy. Indian restaurants were only found in India. Cooking outside was called camping. Seaweed was not a recognised food. "Kebab" was not even a word, never mind a food. Prunes were medicinal. Surprisingly, muesli was readily available, it was called cattle feed. Water came out of the tap. If someone had suggested bottling it and charging more than petrol for it, they would have been a laughing stock!! But one thing that we never ever had on our table in the sixties ..... "Elbows or Phones”.
Non-Coventry - Eating in the 50s and 60s
Dreamtime
2 of 17  Fri 27th Nov 2015 2:35am  
Off-topic / chat  

Norman Conquest
Allesley
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3 of 17  Fri 27th Nov 2015 9:56am  
Member: Joined Oct 2014  Total posts:823

Hi Janey.... Your post is an almost exact copy of my work, "You know when you have got old post 41." Several forumites asked if it was OK to copy my work so it looks as if it is circulating quite well. I also posted it on a sailing forum about a year ago.... Norman
Just old and knackered

Non-Coventry - Eating in the 50s and 60s
Janey
Keresley
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Thread starter
4 of 17  Fri 27th Nov 2015 9:53pm  
Member: Joined Aug 2014  Total posts:155

Hi Norman, I thought it was brilliant, and so true. It was sent to me as an e-mail.
Non-Coventry - Eating in the 50s and 60s
fidobsa
Hungary
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5 of 17  Thu 10th Dec 2015 4:58pm  
Member: Joined Feb 2015  Total posts:36

We did have fish fingers and yoghurt in the '60s (not on the same plate!) but the rest of it seems accurate enough. A couple of things I remember eating in the '60s but have never had since are junket and rissoles. I suspect rissoles are just called something different now, croquettes perhaps?
Non-Coventry - Eating in the 50s and 60s
Dreamtime
Perth Western Australia
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6 of 17  Fri 11th Dec 2015 1:18am  
Member: Joined Jan 2010  Total posts:3058

Junket - YUK! School dinners - YUK! Tripe - YUK! (even with the onions - still YUK!) Roll eyes
Non-Coventry - Eating in the 50s and 60s
Midland Red
Cherwell
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7 of 17  Fri 11th Dec 2015 8:17am  
Moderator: Joined Jan 2010  Total posts:4927

Sounds awful, Dreamtime - so glad I've never tasted any of the three (or four) of them Big grin
Non-Coventry - Eating in the 50s and 60s
Old Lincolnian
Coventry
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8 of 17  Fri 11th Dec 2015 3:23pm  
Member: Joined Sep 2012  Total posts:478

Many of the awful foods like tripe and pigs trotters that my father used to eat for his supper because they were cheap have now been "reinvented" by chefs as delicacies and cost a fortune in posh restaurants.
Non-Coventry - Eating in the 50s and 60s
Roger Turner
Torksey
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9 of 17  Fri 11th Dec 2015 5:33pm  
Member: Joined Aug 2014  Total posts:534

Lovely list Janey, amusing and very thought provoking. Conversely there is exotic stuff we are eating now that I first consumed in the tropics in the 1950s and never thought to see here as a staple part of the diet, such as avocado pears, okra (ladies fingers), mangoes, yams, sweet potatoes. Incidentally does anybody serve Welsh Rarebit (Cardiff Virgin) these days, or its cousin Buck Rarebit (roughly Welsh Rarebit with a poached egg on top)? One "delicacy" in our family from those days, tripe and onions and buckets of gravy, if I remember cooked in milk (maybe a Lancashire dish as my mother came from Manchester). Apologies to Old Lincolnian, I rather liked Pigs Trotters as well but I still can`t stand Spam. Anybody remember the melon jam in tins that came from South Africa during the war (I thought it was slimey), or snoek (fish), or whale meat?
Non-Coventry - Eating in the 50s and 60s
Janey
Keresley
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10 of 17  Sat 12th Dec 2015 6:37pm  
Member: Joined Aug 2014  Total posts:155

On 11th Dec 2015 3:23pm, Old Lincolnian said: Many of the awful foods like tripe and pigs trotters that my father used to eat for his supper because they were cheap have now been "reinvented" by chefs as delicacies and cost a fortune in posh restaurants.
Ugh! Tripe and onions! Or tripe with vinegar. Ugh again. Pigs’ trotters. My mother and my sister often used to have these, in fact my sister still can’t resist buying pigs’ trotters. I seem to remember my mother buying chitterlings, or whatever they were called, and I haven’t a clue what they were but she loved them. When I was young and went to stay with relatives in Newton Abbot, my aunt always made me junket. She came from London so it always sounded like Janket, but I loved it. All white and creamy and sprinkled with nutmeg. I remember mum preparing tongue for Christmas and used to see it in a basin in the kitchen with something heavy on top of it to compress it. Now that was delicious! Lol
Non-Coventry - Eating in the 50s and 60s
Roger Turner
Torksey
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11 of 17  Sat 12th Dec 2015 7:26pm  
Member: Joined Aug 2014  Total posts:534

Janey the Christmas tongue. You are right about the weight and plate on top to compress it. I seem to remember my mother used to use one of the old cake tins with the removable bottom as a mould. Chitterlings were the intestine pipes of the pig used I believe as sausage skins, before we got the stuff like plastic coatings. I have seen chitterlings as a child - turned me off them for ever. I was evacuated to Measham in Leicestershire and went to Ashby .. School. Used to catch a Midland Red bus every day and was dropped off on the return journey on the "wrong" side of the main Birmingham/Ashby road. The lady who lived in a row of cottages used to see me safely across the road. She also did odd jobs for the farm I was evacuated to, one of them was sorting and cleaning the chitterlings after a pig was killed on the farm
Non-Coventry - Eating in the 50s and 60s
Janey
Keresley
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12 of 17  Sun 20th Dec 2015 3:13pm  
Member: Joined Aug 2014  Total posts:155

On 11th Dec 2015 5:33pm, Roger Turner said: Incidentally does anybody serve Welsh Rarebit (Cardiff Virgin) these days,
Hi Roger Wave We LOVE Welsh Rarebit, have done for years. I flavour the mix with Worcs sauce and a pinch of cayenne andI put various toppings on it ...... sliced tomatoes, sliced pickled onions, and grilled smoky bacon which is my husband's favourite. Some nights if I don't fancy eating a dinner I make myself a couple of slices of Rarebit. Mmmmm.
Non-Coventry - Eating in the 50s and 60s
JohnnieWalker
Canberra, Australia
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13 of 17  Sun 20th Dec 2015 9:50pm  
Member: Joined Jul 2011  Total posts:240

As a small kid, I remember my granddad being quite fond of tripe, I think cooked in milk, but it turned me off just to look at it and the taste and texture was disgusting. But at 19, I spent three months in Prague as a student, on work experience in a systems analysis office. We started work at 7am and finished at 3pm, which was rather nice as it was mid-summer and we could all go off and play tennis or swim down in the river for the afternoon. But it meant getting the tram into the city at about 5:30, and grabbing some breakfast in a local cafe before work, and at that time of day it could be quite cold, so something hot was needed. As a way of learning the language, I would always look down a menu and choose something I didn't know - it introduced me to some interesting meals such as "smazeni kvetak" - fried cauliflower. But this particular morning it was SO cold, I looked around for a good hot soup - "polevka". Well, there were lots of soups - I recognised potato soup, ham soup, tomato soup - but what is this "drstkove polevka" - never heard of it - I'll try it! So they served it up, and it looked absolutely beautiful - like a thick, rich beef soup. It tasted beautiful and beefy too - but what are these wriggly things at the bottom? I had eaten several of them without looking - and they were delicious - so I fished one out and looked at it. It looked like one of those ragworms they use for fishing bait! Long and wriggly, with lots of legs! Yuck!! Still, it was the taste that mattered, and it was heavenly! The "ove" at the end is just an adjective ending, just like we add "ish" or "y" to the end of a word (bull - bullish; fish - fishy), but a search of my pocket dictionary failed to find any word related to "drstk". I had to consult a bigger dictionary to find it means "tripe". Transformed my opinion of the edibility of tripe forever! The French do a tasty tripe dish too. Get the very thin tripe, and cook it for ages in a thick sauce of tomato, marjoram (or equivalent), black olives, garlic and paprika. At least that's how I think it was cooked, and I've replicated it successfully a few times. Let me know if you try it!
True Blue Coventry Kid

Non-Coventry - Eating in the 50s and 60s
David H
Lancashire
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14 of 17  Mon 21st Dec 2015 9:14pm  
Member: Joined Mar 2014  Total posts:105

We went on a cruise a couple of years ago with an American line, and tripe soup was a menu choice one evening. It was delicious! When I was a child my father had tripe and onions regularly. I often had some as well, and liked it. It had a taste all of its own with the boiled onions in buttery milk and lots of pepper.
Non-Coventry - Eating in the 50s and 60s
Dreamtime
Perth Western Australia
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15 of 17  Tue 22nd Dec 2015 12:13am  
Member: Joined Jan 2010  Total posts:3058

Sorry David H and JW, if you don't mind I will stick to Welsh Rarebit with Janey. Janey - have you tried very thinly sliced mushrooms with the cheese melted on top. Very yummy snack on toast. Bon appetite.
Non-Coventry - Eating in the 50s and 60s

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