Topic categories:

The Internet - a knowledge base without compare

You need to be signed in to respond to this topic

No actionNo action

Displaying 1 to 15 of 18 posts

Page 1 of 2

1 2
Next pageNo action
18 posts:
Order:    

Helen F
Warrington
All posts by this member
1 of 18  Thu 12th May 2016 11:42am  
Member: Joined Mar 2013  Total posts:693

I made a comment about looking online for training videos for new software in Norman Conquest's topic Image Software but I think it deserves a wider significance. The internet is becoming a wonderful place for learning stuff. I've learnt over recent years to approach any new task by looking for a 'how to' video online or reading copious comments from those who have gone before me. From tips on laying laminate flooring to step by step guides to complex software, it's out there. And if it isn't out there, you could be the one to help someone else. As some of you know, I've been lured into the world of virtual modelling but as a complete beginner, where do you start other than spending a lot of money on a proper course/s? It turned out I didn't need to spend a penny to get started. I could vicariously examine the software and judge how easy or how hard it was, to see if I was suited. Then, having made the decision to get the right equipment (plenty of moula), I could download all the software I needed for free. I could then follow the instructions for how to operate the software step by step (including download and install the software if I'd needed it). I can watch the videos and pause after each point to test the training on my own machine. I can then either move on or repeat the same bit of video if I got it wrong or needed a reminder. Or I can seek a different video to explain the point in another way. You just can't pay for that level of help. The only thing I supply is determination to absorb what's on offer. Sites like our host's is a fine example of how people are improving the knowledge base. By bringing together the best information about a subject, you do something that would take decades by normal means. You make the information accessible in a way that's never been possible. You spark interest in people who might never engage and they supply information that only they have access to. I've been in contact with various people about Coventry history and I'll say something in passing and the other person asks 'how did you know that?' I reply 'oh on the Historic Coventry web site, haven't you visited it?' Some organisations fear that if they put their content online that they make it less valuable but what people do with information is amazing. From having zero interest in Coventry, now I'm fascinated. I've visited Coventry's restaurants, theatre and museums. I've been into Coventry town centre more times since I left, than the same number of years while I lived there. I hope that soon I'll be able to give something back in the form of what I've learnt. Do you feel the internet has radically changed the way you learn things?
The Internet - a knowledge base without compare
Rob Orland
Historic Coventry
All posts by this member
2 of 18  Fri 13th May 2016 3:27pm  
Webmaster: Joined Jan 2010  Total posts:906

I completely agree Helen, the internet has vastly changed both the way we learn things and the availability of information. I'm also very grateful that you've kindly included this site among your examples, although it's largely due to the wonderful wealth of information provided by the members. My first realisation that the internet was an amazing knowledge base came in the late 1990s when I began using it to trace our family tree. I'd have had no idea where to begin had it not been for the Church of Latter Day Saints "IGI" website with it's ever expanding transcriptions of church records. It made building up a basic overview of where our ancestors came from extremely quick and easy. Without it I'd have had to visit every county records centre in the country in the hope of finding something - a virtually impossible task. And once I had some names in our tree, so began my first website. Once again, I'd have had to write a billion letters to every family around the world to find out who else we were related to - but instead, I ended up with 30 or 40 people from all over the globe eventually noticing their family names on my website and contacting me instead. The internet is an amazing learning resource indeed, even allowing for the few who try to spoil it with spam & viruses, etc.!
The Internet - a knowledge base without compare
Wearethemods
Aberdeenshire
All posts by this member
3 of 18  Fri 13th May 2016 7:02pm  
Off-topic / chat  

Annewiggy
Tamworth
All posts by this member
4 of 18  Fri 13th May 2016 8:35pm  
Member: Joined Jan 2013  Total posts:1009

My husband was hooked on computers from the start. We have had one in the house since the late 1970's when we started with a Tandy model 1. Not much memory and hours spent typing in basic programs. At one point Carrefour in Minworth introduced online shopping. They sent you a booklet with codes for the foods you wanted. Trouble was they hadn't introduced online payments yet ! The connection was a bit iffy as well, a phone stuck in an accoustic coupler. I had started my family tree then but that involved sending away for stuff or taking pot luck at the records offices. Computers gradually improved a little and then I believe it was 1990 someone invented something called the World Wide Web. The first time we looked at it we thought, well it's ok but there isn't much on it, can't see it taking off. How wrong we were. I don't think there is anything you can't find on it. Like Rob I have found so much information on my family tree that woulldn't have been possible without it. I have been in touch with many distant members of my tree and found what a small world it is because someone has taken the trouble to put something on the web. But to answer Your question Helen, do I believe it has changed the way I learn things, the answer is an astounding YES. If you want to find out about something you can, instantly. If you want to know what something is, who something is, why something is happening, what is happening etc. etc, etc. It will more than likely be on the web. People might thing that is good or bad but I would not like to be without it.
The Internet - a knowledge base without compare
Old Lincolnian
Coventry
All posts by this member
5 of 18  Fri 13th May 2016 9:05pm  
Member: Joined Sep 2012  Total posts:441

I've spent most of my working life repairing electronic equipment with little or no information available on them ( I once got a job on the strength of being able to repair the 5" Rigonda Russian televisions, a company had just bought 5000 of them and discovered they weren't the most reliable things in the world). We did begin to take photos of some items when dismantling them using a Polaroid camera (pre-digital so the quality was not always what we wanted, and also expensive to use). and made training manuals from them. Over the past few years the internet has been a major help for servicing to me from a video showing you how to dismantle a Nintendo DS to obscure circuit diagrams from various user groups. The only snag is that not everybody finds this an effective way to learn. A friend of my wifes learnt to knit this way but was having problems because there was no-one to tell her what she was doing wrong, it was sorted out in a couple of minutes as soon as we saw what she was doing. I must admit though that when I want to know most things from "How do I change a faulty laptop key?" to "What else have I seen .... in?" the internet is often my first choice. It's not really cheating to use an online crossword solver when you're really stuck is it?. OK maybe it is Blush
The Internet - a knowledge base without compare
pixrobin
Canley
All posts by this member
6 of 18  Fri 13th May 2016 9:20pm  
Member: Joined Mar 2014  Total posts:991

Without the internet I would still be languishing in Lancashire! Almost all of my research into finding a place to live in Coventry was done on the internet. Two quick trips down the M6 and just over a week later I was moving in to my apartment. My move would never have happened without the internet. In August 2014 I had not contemplated moving back to my home city. By December I was here starting a new episode to my life. How do I feel about it 18 months later? I feel at home. I enjoy each day and each evening I look forward to tomorrow.
The Internet - a knowledge base without compare
Dreamtime
Perth Western Australia
All posts by this member
7 of 18  Sat 14th May 2016 10:58am  
Member: Joined Jan 2010  Total posts:2870

Lovely Pix, and so you should, here's to an exciting future there for you. Wave
The Internet - a knowledge base without compare
Helen F
Warrington
All posts by this member
Thread starter
8 of 18  Tue 17th May 2016 11:32am  
Member: Joined Mar 2013  Total posts:693

What great replies. Rob, don't underestimate the specialness of what you do. While the internet is great, in that it offers loads of information and Google isn't bad at finding it for you, the act of accumulating that information or links to it, is essential. By bringing it all together (and people) it adds considerable value. It's spurred other people to push bits of it further. As the internet grows it will be harder and harder to extract the gems from the dross without sites that specialise in a subject. Theoretically, it should be done officially by the council or the museum but it never seems to capture the same spirit somehow. I think it partly stems from rules and regulations, just making it a pain to publish anything or manage the public, but the biggest part is enthusiasm. Wearethemods, I drooled over the Encyclopaedia Brittanica but by the time I could afford to buy them, there was a free CD version and not long after, the internet took off. Some say that the internet will kill off people remembering stuff, but I think it's more subtle than that. I actually know more about more things because I look stuff up rather than try to remember, then promise I will look it up in an encyclopaedia and finally give up because it is too hard and I don't really care about the answer. On things like dates, names, etc I never would have bothered to memorise information anyway, so I've not lost anything by not bothering to memorise it now the internet will remember for me. I will wonder about more things because the act of finding out is no longer a chore. I'll tackle new jobs because I can find out how to do them. Anne and Rob, yes the family tree thing really kicked off the way people referenced information. Even before the internet. I can't think of anything that was faster off the mark, except maps and encyclopaedias. It was one of the first areas where people collaborated. I can see a point where the family history jigsaw is complete as far as the information will allow. The last connections will be made, because those will be the ancestors without any other possible identity (if you know what I mean). DNA may add another dimension but it depends upon how many people get tested and offer up their results. Anne, I got my first computer December 1980 and after that I was hooked. I'd used an IBM PET before that and could see the potential. I too was underwhelmed by the internet because at first there wasn't much to see. The first sites were mostly business PR pages. While big organisations have posted treasures, the location is often hard to find, never mind the stuff you're looking for eg Britain From Above etc may have been there all along, but it took someone here mentioning it here, to make me aware. Old Lincolnian, annoyingly, obtaining manuals is a hit and miss things these days. Initially what was there was often free to access at the site for the manufacturer, now someone often wants paying. It's understandable but it makes me think less well of the manufacturer of the item I can't get a manual for. Training videos are a mixed bag and probably not so useful for things that require manual dexterity or some other physical skill. I'm even sure that I'm doing things wrong that a live trainer could spot straight away but even if I decide to go to a real course, I'll go as an intermediate rather than a beginner and have specific questions I need answering. It's also an area that forums are good for. Forums offer a chance to ask what you need rather than be told it all of it from scratch. You can video something and ask for comments. pixrobin, I'm glad the move is going well for you. Thumbs up House buying is very much an internet success. I've bought two and sold four in the last 10 years Oh my using the internet for large parts of the process. I've even planned driving trips on Google so that I know what to expect. I have to resist the urge to look at my old homes to see what the new owners have done with them.
The Internet - a knowledge base without compare
PhilipInCoventry
Holbrooks
All posts by this member
9 of 18  Mon 23rd May 2016 6:23pm  
Moderator: Joined Apr 2010  Total posts:3852

Hi Helen, Hi all Wave We often consider what great events are iconic to a particular era, motorcars, television & so on, but for me, the internet has to be the most far reaching of all of the icons that I have experienced in my life-time. I grew up into an environment where cars & televisions were already in existence. The internet is entirely new for me. I have never been to Australia, but on one of our threads, I am enjoying coffee with our lovely member Dreamtime, courtesy of Google maps, seeing what I would be seeing if I was actually there. The fish & chips were good too. That has to be a first. Thank you for starting this thread. Wave Thumbs up PS Must check to see if my internet orders have arrived at Argos! Oh my
The Internet - a knowledge base without compare
pixrobin
Canley
All posts by this member
10 of 18  Mon 23rd May 2016 8:58pm  
Member: Joined Mar 2014  Total posts:991

The internet and particularly this forum have given me my big photographic project for 2016. The forum has shown me how much interest there is in old photographs. So my project for the year is to photograph every street in what I call Westwood Parish. I can hear the clamour of voices saying "Why? Google Earth provides all that." That is true but Google Earth Street Views get updated over the years: mine will be of a specific time and place and still show the same view in the future. Today is the future's history. What do I plan to do with them? When edited and labelled (the time consuing part) I plan to ask The Herbert's History Centre to keep them and make the files available free under a Creative Commons licence for non-commercial use. If anyone has other ideas for long term storage/distribution I'm open to suggestions. Though the images are mostly 'street views' I'm also including different views that Google's cameras can't reach but are available to me on my mobility scooter. They are views that had caught my eye as I trundle round. Different types of buildings, particular vistas, or happenings.
The Internet - a knowledge base without compare
mcsporran
Coventry & Cebu
All posts by this member
11 of 18  Wed 25th May 2016 10:47pm  
Member: Joined Oct 2013  Total posts:303

Although Google will always show the latest imagery, it keeps the old versions too. If you run Google Earth, select View then Historical Imagery, you get a date slider that you can adjust back to 1999, or even 1945.
The Internet - a knowledge base without compare
pixrobin
Canley
All posts by this member
12 of 18  Thu 26th May 2016 8:10am  
Member: Joined Mar 2014  Total posts:991

yes, but that is only for the overhead view. Street view shows only the latest version. That's not intended as a criticism of Google Earth. I plan all my local photographic trips using Google Earth because the map of Coventry in my head is 50 years out of date.
The Internet - a knowledge base without compare
Helen F
Warrington
All posts by this member
Thread starter
13 of 18  Fri 27th May 2016 2:14pm  
Member: Joined Mar 2013  Total posts:693

Philip, the internet is the great invention of our time, though at first I was a bit sniffy about it like Anne. Until people started using it, it was a bit naff. On the one side it is taking over real human interaction but at the same time it is allowing people to meet and exchange ideas that would never have met in ordinary circumstances. It will be a trial for businesses and people to exist happily along side it. Like any massive societal change it will force people to evolve. Trying to hold onto the old way of doing things will fail but there will be new ways to thrive (like click and collect). One of the things that is most curious is it's ability to give power (good and bad) to the people. Some of the most interesting internet developments are driven by the enthusiasm of individuals not corporations (well until it's bought out). Even Facebook (of which I do not partake) is all about the people who use it. If they move somewhere else, Facebook dies. If people stopped using Google, Google wouldn't need to pay taxes, it would vanish. What's bad about the internet is that it's ephemeral. Digital data is very easy to lose or get deleted. Robin's right to take his own photos of his area. As I've tried to log the city, bits of it have vanished from one Google street view to the next. Coventry is demolishing older land marks faster than I can pin point them on the map. Oh my The photos that have been most useful to me have not been the most iconic but the most mundane. The interesting bits of the city were photographed and painted over and over again but the scrubby bits often have no images at all. Sad So snap away Robin, you never know who might find the images useful. The guy fixing the roof is a good snapshot (pun) of that job. It puts the size of the roof into perspective. Just think about how the information could be kept. I think we are still only on the foothills of discovering what the internet and computer can do for us.
The Internet - a knowledge base without compare
Dreamtime
Perth Western Australia
All posts by this member
14 of 18  Sun 29th May 2016 3:49pm  
Off-topic / chat  

pixrobin
Canley
All posts by this member
15 of 18  Sun 29th May 2016 8:25pm  
Member: Joined Mar 2014  Total posts:991

No, not these days Dreamtime. But there was a time I stood on the back of a Hercules Transport so I could get a picture of two jets refuelling from a tanker aircraft over Cyprus. These days I go at a much slower pace - on an 8mph mobility scooter. Also added another camera to my armoury this past week: a Go-Pro action camera. It fits to a baseball cap and films my meanderings around Coventry. In due course I'll probably put some stuff on YouTube.
The Internet - a knowledge base without compare

You need to be signed in to respond to this topic

No actionNo action

Displaying 1 to 15 of 18 posts

Page 1 of 2

1 2
Next pageNo action

Previous (older) topic

GEC Copsewood (Telephone Works, Stoke)
|

Next (newer) topic

Coventry Telegraph
View similar topics in the Computer hints and tips category
 
Home | Forum index | Forum stats | Forum help | Log out | About me | My music
Top of the page
HTML5
1,265,346
Counter by Rob Orland

This page last updated 21st April 2017  (Load time: 58ms)