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The Coventry you will never know

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Annewiggy
Tamworth
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16 of 20  Tue 19th Dec 2017 12:58pm  
Member: Joined Jan 2013  Total posts:1081

MORE BRIDGE SCHEMES Coventry City Council have a very full agenda at its meeting on Tuesday, and another important bridge improvement scheme will figure in the recommendations. It may be remembered that at a recent meeting the City Council decided, subject to the receipt of the necessary Ministerial grants, to proceed - with the widening of a number of bridges, including that at London Road (adjoining the Cemetery), Tusses Bridge, and Red Lane Bridge. At that time it was suggested that a number of other bridges were in need of similar attention, and among those mentioned was the narrow structure over the railway in Beechwood Avenue, near the Standard Company's Works. From the Coventry Evening Telegraph 23 November 1933
Local History and Heritage - The Coventry you will never know
Kaga simpson
Peacehaven, East Sussex
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17 of 20  Tue 26th Dec 2017 3:16pm  
Member: Joined Sep 2014  Total posts:1900

During the 1920/30's people saw Broadgate as between the bottom of Trinity Street and the Burges up to the High Street. You could see the top of Broadgate from the bottom, shops all the way from top to bottom. With no cars in those days people alighted from the buses at the bottom of Bishop Street, outside the Gas Showrooms, and the bottom of Trinity Street, it was a wonderful way to shop. When they built the new Owen Owen's, 1950's, they split Broadgate in two. You could no longer see the top half from the Burges and people no longer got off the buses as they used to, so the Burges died, became more of a bus depot. It was more like closing the shop door, people are more prone to enter a shop if the door is open. Broadgate became a drab walled square with less shoppers. I have no idea about the Coventry today.
Local History and Heritage - The Coventry you will never know
Kaga simpson
Peacehaven, East Sussex
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18 of 20  Mon 1st Jan 2018 11:26am  
Member: Joined Sep 2014  Total posts:1900

Over a century ago Coventry was more Art Nouveau than it will ever be again for almost every family had some form of art, people may not have had schooling and education but they were born into a world of art, in painting, iron work, woodcraft, etc. all around them was art in some form or another, even door knockers, railings had scattered acorn or oak sprigs in their design. My Granny had a large tablecloth about twelve foot square, of silken damask, woven into it was horses, goats and trees, in one corner shows a man with a spaniel at his heels and a very short muzzled gun in his hands, and farm life thus, cleverly brought together. Children on the canal boats were taught to paint, flowers and scenes at a very early age. Boys learnt the tools of carpentry and the kind of wood needed for each and every job, it was a natural thing that was around them, people where more aware of the beauty around them and expressed it in many ways and forms. We only have to look around Coventry, to see the beauty and artistic designs that have stood for centuries to delight us still.
Local History and Heritage - The Coventry you will never know
Kaga simpson
Peacehaven, East Sussex
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19 of 20  Thu 4th Jan 2018 2:59pm  
Member: Joined Sep 2014  Total posts:1900

1937 was a great time to be in Coventry, the Livingstone pool opened in 36, the Hippodrome 37, Trinity Street, the new Owen Owen. Cinemas with new colour films, dancehalls and jazz all began to take a larger part in our lives. Education and employment offered more security and choice depending on how hard you wanted to work. People lived better. People tried to shrug off the dark cloud of Europe hanging over us - but alas not for long.
Local History and Heritage - The Coventry you will never know
Kaga simpson
Peacehaven, East Sussex
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20 of 20  Fri 12th Jan 2018 1:39pm  
Member: Joined Sep 2014  Total posts:1900

The old world I once knew has long gone. The Coventry accent that was once so common in rural areas has all but disappeared. A time when the world turned at a slower pace and we all had time to laugh. I was standing in Bunty's kitchen with a cup of tea in one hand, crippled up with laughter trying to steady myself with my other hand on a table. I was watching the old dear run around her garden with a stick. She was screaming at the neighbour's tom cat while trying to smack it with the stick, her other hand was firmly pressing down upon her wig that was lifting off her head like a bird escaping from the nest. She was swearing that should not have been heard by any child. It had all started when she brought me a cup of tea for running a errand for her. We were both staring out of the window at her beautiful garden - we both saw what was taking place in her garden. Bunty's cat, a pedigree English Blue called Princess was romantically engaged with next-door's flea-ridden old tom cat. Bunty had protected her Princess ever since the new neighbours had moved in, now she screamed. Bunty had other ideas. The 86 year-old was out of her back-door like an olympic sprinter chasing the amorous Tom. She cornered the hissing tabby against the fence, for a split second the cat was hunch backed, feet splayed, fangs out. She swung her stick at him. The tabby went one way, her wig went the other, and I spat tea all over the table. It was hilarious.
Local History and Heritage - The Coventry you will never know

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