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Helen F
Warrington
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16 of 29  Mon 19th Mar 2018 10:45am  
Moderator: Joined Mar 2013  Total posts:1834

I'd never heard the ones for the great lakes Beesman but then I'm not sure that they were ever mentioned. Too much stuff about market gardening in the Vale of Evesham. Rob, I think everyone learned something different for sine, cosine and tangent. I was taught by my Dad, by listening him try to teach my brother. Those small pink hippos appealed to a 11 year old girl more than a 13 year old boy, before I knew anything about the maths.
Non-Coventry - Mnemonics
PhilipInCoventry
Holbrooks
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17 of 29  Mon 19th Mar 2018 11:51am  
Moderator: Joined Apr 2010  Total posts:4255

Hi all, Hi Helen, Does this appeal to you? Rules of Science.
Non-Coventry - Mnemonics
Helen F
Warrington
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18 of 29  Mon 19th Mar 2018 1:45pm  
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Of course, hee hee! Nice one. Stuff should always be taught with a comedy song. I haven't listened to much of their stuff. I'm enjoying the oldies at the moment. Randall & Hopkirk on the TV and The full works of The Two Ronnies on DVD.
Non-Coventry - Mnemonics
Helen F
Warrington
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19 of 29  Thu 3rd May 2018 4:40pm  
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May I recommend today's Google Doodle. Click on it and watch the 3D video. You can swivel round by grabbing the screen and swiping left or right, fast or as slow as you like. I watched it a few times to see the different cameos.
Non-Coventry - Mnemonics
Roger T
Torksey
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20 of 29  Thu 3rd May 2018 9:00pm  
Member: Joined Jul 2019  Total posts:574

On 18th Mar 2018 3:16am, Beesman said: The following was drilled into me whilst attending KHVIII many years ago: Some Men Have Easy Occupations. Alternatively: Should Mad Hatters Eat (Fresh) Oysters?
There was also another one about trig that I learned at KHVIII (1947-51) I think it was something about negative numbers. Anyway it was about 4 quadrants. So counting from top right: The first quadrant they were (A)ll positive (Sine, Cosine, Tan) All 2nd quadrant below first Only (S)ine " Sailors 3rd " below left " (T)angent " Take 4th " upper left " (C)osine " Care Our maths master was Bolam or Beetham, ex Navy and I think NZ.
Non-Coventry - Mnemonics
Maya
York
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21 of 29  Fri 4th May 2018 10:58pm  
Member: Joined Apr 2013  Total posts:14

Growing up in Coventry I had learnt: 'Richard of York gave battle in vain' But on moving to the chocolate city of York I found that the children learnt: 'Rowntrees of York give best in value' Now they've sold out to Nestle the rhyme wouldn't work.
Non-Coventry - Mnemonics
Slim
Another Coventry kid
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22 of 29  Fri 26th Oct 2018 8:18am  
Member: Joined Mar 2013  Total posts:592

I have mixed feeling about mnemonics. The ones I have a problem with include: CAST (Jack Wrench) and its variants, e.g. All Stations To Coventry: in which quadrant does one start, and does one go clockwise or anticlockwise (counter clockwise if you're American)? Could never remember. BODMAS: what does the O stand for? I've seen order, of, or... I've always found BODMAS unnecessary - just use brackets wherever appropriate, then there's no confusion. Good mnemonics include: Should mad hatters eat nice oysters? (Thunderguts). The n is for Niagara, and it's in the right place geographically. ROY-G-BIV for the colours of the visible spectrum.
Non-Coventry - Mnemonics
Old Lincolnian
Coventry
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23 of 29  Fri 26th Oct 2018 10:20am  
Member: Joined Sep 2012  Total posts:509

Hi Slim Wave Yes the O does stand for of. As I'm sure you know it is the order of using the operators when solving complex equations - so first work out the brackets, the anything that says "of" then finally onto the normal operators
Non-Coventry - Mnemonics
Helen F
Warrington
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24 of 29  Fri 26th Oct 2018 11:39am  
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I can work out the 'Should mad hatters eat nice oysters?' but what does the 'Thunderguts' stand for, Slim?
Non-Coventry - Mnemonics
Slim
Another Coventry kid
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25 of 29  Fri 26th Oct 2018 12:25pm  
Member: Joined Mar 2013  Total posts:592

Ah, he was our geography teacher (KHVIII), and also the head games master. Real name Keith McGawley, but for generations known as Thunderguts; he was a big man, with a very loud voice, hence the nickname!
Non-Coventry - Mnemonics
Slim
Another Coventry kid
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26 of 29  Fri 26th Oct 2018 12:49pm  
Member: Joined Mar 2013  Total posts:592

With practice, mnemonics can be dispensed with. For example, and I'm sure Philip will agree, you don't even think about FACE, EGBDF, ACEG or whatever, you simply see the dots and (hopefully) your fingers drop onto the correct keys. In fact, if you have to remember FACE, you're too late and have lost all semblance of the tune! That's how I started. Same with the resistor colour codes: at the age of eleven I would see three orange bands and immediately know it was a 33k (33 followed by 3 zeroes). The sequence for the digits 0 through 9 is: Black, Brown, Red, Orange, Yellow, Green, Blue, Violet, Grey and White. At school, in the radio club, we learnt something like Bertie Brown refreshes... very good whisky. Later in life someone told me a much easier one to remember, but it dare not be repeated here. Suffice it to say that it has sexual and racist elements! Oh my By the age of 13, I no longer needed the mnemonic.
Non-Coventry - Mnemonics
Bumblyari
Hants
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27 of 29  Fri 26th Oct 2018 1:03pm  
Member: Joined Apr 2015  Total posts:32

Unfortunately the mnemonic I learned for electronic resistor colour codes is no longer politically correct. (Black, Brown, Red, Orange, Yellow, Green, Blue, Violet, Grey, White representing the digits from 0 to 9) Oops, overlapped with Slim who obviously learned the same one as me. Edited by member, 26th Oct 2018 1:05 pm
nostalgia (-ja) n. dreaming of it being like it was when you dreamt of it being like it is now

Non-Coventry - Mnemonics
bohica
coventry
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28 of 29  Fri 26th Oct 2018 5:29pm  
Member: Joined Apr 2012  Total posts:277

I learned the resistor colour code backwards.... Why Give Virgins Babies Get Yourself One Regular Bum Boy Blush Blush I bet they don't teach that at Tech' these days
Non-Coventry - Mnemonics
Helen F
Warrington
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29 of 29  Fri 26th Oct 2018 6:00pm  
Moderator: Joined Mar 2013  Total posts:1834

Ha, I did wonder if those colours were resistor bands but didn't use them enough to learn them. One of my favourite scenes from Red Dwarf is when Rimmer has written cheats all over his arms and legs. He reads one out - `CUTIE'. Current under tension is ... what's this? Current under tension is equal? Current under tension is expandable? Current under tension is expensive? What does this mean? [Begins to panic.] What does any of it mean? I've covered my body in complete and utter and total absolute nonsense gibberish! I still don't know what the E stands for.
Non-Coventry - Mnemonics

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