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MP offices: location 1800s

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Disorganised1
Coventry
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16 of 22  Mon 25th May 2020 5:36pm  
Member: Joined Nov 2012  Total posts:259

Always surprises me how low the entrances to coaching inn yards are. You can see them in the photo, then if you look at the size of a coach and four, I don't see how they would have got in.
MP offices: location 1800s
Helen F
Warrington
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17 of 22  Mon 25th May 2020 6:30pm  
Moderator: Joined Mar 2013  Total posts:2330

Forum library image There are quite a few paintings of coaches that passed through Coventry. Some may have just had a change of horses. Some yards had taller entrances than others. Edited by member, 25th May 2020 6:33 pm
MP offices: location 1800s
SJT
Brisbane, Australia
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Thread starter
18 of 22  Tue 26th May 2020 12:11am  
Member: Joined Apr 2018  Total posts:46

Thanks Rob and yes, the pub page is excellent. Kaga, yes the various accounts of the 1820 election are fascinating. I've heard elections were often violent in Coventry and voters on both sides were commonly incentivised (£ and alcohol). I thought Cobbett's account sounded a bit improbable in parts eg. he didn't turn up to canvass voters at the critical time, then claimed it was because he'd lost his voice on account of the presence of a crowd of ruffians... hhhmmmm. Interesting that Ellice is described almost universally as a moderate and affable man, not one prone to aggression (there's a lot of material on him given he held a cabinet post, was married to the PM's younger sister and was instrumental in getting the Great Reform Act passed and into law). Edited by member, 26th May 2020 1:32 am
MP offices: location 1800s
SJT
Brisbane, Australia
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Thread starter
19 of 22  Tue 26th May 2020 1:49am  
Member: Joined Apr 2018  Total posts:46

On 25th May 2020 9:13am, Rob Orland said: I don't know if any of the photos on this pub page are of any use?
The pub page is excellent, Rob. I went straight to it when Helen and Anne mentioned the Craven Arms. I also used it to help locate the site of the Butchers Arms. There was a confrontation there between the key prosecution witness (a stranger from out of town) and local weavers. I loved writing that scene. Punches are thrown and it's high drama as the locals accuse this fellow of being a liar.
MP offices: location 1800s
Rob Orland
Historic Coventry
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20 of 22  Tue 26th May 2020 9:32am  
Webmaster: Joined Jan 2010  Total posts:1604

I'm glad the pub website has proved useful, that's great to know. Credit must be given, however, to Fred Luckett and John Ashby for most of the research on all those pubs.
MP offices: location 1800s
Kaga simpson
Peacehaven, East Sussex
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21 of 22  Tue 26th May 2020 11:23am  
Member: Joined Sep 2014  Total posts:3750

SGT, Yes, I had a few thoughts about the account. But it did turn bloody, and someone brought the alcohol. He did accuse Ellice in the Political Register of inciting the mob to murder him, both in the attack on Mr Sergeant’s house on Earl St and at the election booth.
MP offices: location 1800s
Kaga simpson
Peacehaven, East Sussex
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22 of 22  Mon 1st Jun 2020 11:51am  
Member: Joined Sep 2014  Total posts:3750

SJT Most prisoners were conveyed to London by the famous coach 'Eclipse' calling in at the Craven, or starting from the Craven. No one was more well known than Ned Hassall, driver & Tom Peck, the guard. They had been together for many years on the road, Ned from Brum, Tom from Cov. At one time they were conveying some prisoners from Chester to London, heavily ironed and chained - neither guard or driver liked the job, knowing the men would be hung or transported. Near Dunchurch a lonely part of the road, by some means they secured the keys and unlocked themselves, seized the warder, clambered on the coach and seized the guard and driver, tied all three securely to their seats, took the horses from the coach, mounting them two/three to each horse and fled. At Bourton they compelled a blacksmith to undo their fetters, and they made a clean escape. One frosty winter day as they arrived at the Craven, as the horses were changed, Peck was busy lifting heavy luggage from the coach at the rear, his foot slipped, he fell back on to the pavement, his head striking the kerb. His brains dashed out, he died on the spot. Ned, seeing his guard dead, feinted, was taken into the hotel. When he came round he was a helpless lunatic, and remained so the rest of his life.
MP offices: location 1800s

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