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Black Pad and Tin Lizzy

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TonyS
Coventry
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16 of 29  Sat 26th May 2012 11:09pm  
Member: Joined Jan 2011  Total posts:1572

Hi Anne & Dutchman, "Black" as in "Tarmac" Thumbs up (but does the phrase pre-date tarmacadam?)
Black Pad and Tin Lizzy
dutchman
Spon End
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17 of 29  Sun 27th May 2012 12:09am  
Member: Joined Mar 2010  Total posts:2991

I think it does Tony? Also Tarmac was mainly used where there was horse-drawn traffic but these were strictly footpaths only, and also unmade as far as I can tell. There may have been some other substance spread on the footpaths to make them less muddy such as ash or coke? Then again the 'black' may be a reference to them being unofficial, unlit or simply dangerous. "Footpads" were a type of highwayman who preyed on walkers as opposed to coach travellers.
Black Pad and Tin Lizzy
TonyS
Coventry
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18 of 29  Sun 27th May 2012 8:17am  
Member: Joined Jan 2011  Total posts:1572

Actually Dutchman, I think you may have just answered it, wasn't coke especially used quite a lot?
Black Pad and Tin Lizzy
dutchman
Spon End
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19 of 29  Sun 27th May 2012 2:24pm  
Member: Joined Mar 2010  Total posts:2991

I can remember coke being used myself but am unable to find any historical references to its use.
Black Pad and Tin Lizzy
anne
coventry
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20 of 29  Sun 27th May 2012 5:59pm  
Member: Joined Feb 2012  Total posts:287

There is a section on 'footpads' in a great book I've had for years, called 'The Victorian Underworld' by Kellow Chesney. Here you can also read about all manner of weirdly named classes of criminals. Your post has reminded me of this book, so thanks! Cheers
Black Pad and Tin Lizzy
PhilipInCoventry
Holbrooks
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21 of 29  Sun 27th May 2012 6:13pm  
Moderator: Joined Apr 2010  Total posts:4327

Hi all Wave Wave A picture recorded this afternoon, from Lockhurst Lane railway bridge looking towards the area that I knew as the Black Pad. Wave
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gregs
Coventry
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22 of 29  Sat 2nd Jun 2012 10:13pm  
Member: Joined Jun 2012  Total posts:1

I remember when my old gran lived at the side of those lines in the fifties, I used to go out of her back garden into some wasteland and watch old Tin Lizzy going past. Smile
Black Pad and Tin Lizzy
Chaingang
Tile Hill Village
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23 of 29  Sun 3rd Jun 2012 12:20am  
Member: Joined Oct 2011  Total posts:60

Years ago I remember asking this same question, I was given to understand that the black was fly ash from the factory boilers.
adopted coventry

Black Pad and Tin Lizzy
Dicko
Bedworth
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24 of 29  Wed 27th Jun 2012 11:40pm  
Member: Joined Jun 2012  Total posts:2

Hi there, I'm new to this forum and find very interesting but my reason initially for coming on here was to find out (if at all possible) why "The Black Pad" in Holbrooks/Radford by COVENTRIANS RFC is so called ? I have seen a few variations which are possibles but I could do with a definitive answer for my research. I did hear that it was once an aerodrome and was called that because of the ash that was spread on the ground? Can anybody help? Cheers Roll eyes
Black Pad and Tin Lizzy
TonyS
Coventry
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25 of 29  Thu 28th Jun 2012 7:42am  
Member: Joined Jan 2011  Total posts:1572

Hello Dicko, and welcome to our forum Wave Are you asking why this particular "Black Pad" is so called, or where the generic phrase "The Black Pad" comes from?
Black Pad and Tin Lizzy
Baz
Coventry
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Thread starter
26 of 29  Sat 30th Jun 2012 11:26pm  
Member: Joined May 2012  Total posts:341

The Black Pad that many of us are talking about runs across Burnaby Road from the Coventry / Nuneaton rail line. If you were to look at the 1936 map of old map scans, it shows The Black Pad being there before Burnaby Road was even built. It was a part track / road, then turns into a footpath linking to Penny Park Lane. Blush
Always looking forward to looking at the past.

Black Pad and Tin Lizzy
Dicko
Bedworth
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27 of 29  Tue 3rd Jul 2012 11:04pm  
Member: Joined Jun 2012  Total posts:2

On 28th Jun 2012 7:42am, TonyS said: Are you asking why this particular "Black Pad" is so called, or where the generic phrase "The Black Pad" comes from?
Hi TonyS, Yes i would like to find out why this particular "Black Pad" is so called! I have found out the various generic possibilities, so the real reason would be cool! Cheers
Black Pad and Tin Lizzy
flapdoodle
Coventry
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28 of 29  Tue 3rd Jul 2012 11:27pm  
Member: Joined Nov 2010  Total posts:892

Pad is from the Anglo Saxon or maybe even Dutch, and does apparently mean path. Black is derived from old words that mean 'dark'. So, maybe 'dark path'? They may have passed through woodland or something and that's how they got their name? It's a common name for a path.
Black Pad and Tin Lizzy
TomRymer
Binley Woods
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29 of 29  Sun 29th Jul 2012 5:50pm  
Member: Joined Jul 2012  Total posts:12

The Black Pad I particularly remember somewhere in Wyken, exactly where I'm not sure, was composed of ash and clinker, the same material used for footpaths / lanes on private allotment sites such as Stratford Street and those which used to cut Sewall Highway in two, possibly known as Stoke Heath allotments. Incidentally Sewall Highway had confusing street signs at one time, some read Sewall and other Sewell.
Black Pad and Tin Lizzy

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