Topic categories:

King Henry VIII Grammar School

You need to be signed in to respond to this topic

First pagePrevious page

Displaying 1411 to 1420 of 1420 posts

Page 95 of 95

1 2 3 4 5 .... 10 .... 15 .... 20 .... 25 .... 30 .... 35 .... 40 .... 45 .... 50 .... 55 .... 60 .... 65 .... 70 .... 75 .... 80 .... 85 .... 90 91 92 93 94 95
No actionNo action
1420 posts:
Order:    

Slim
Another Coventry kid
All posts by this member
1411 of 1420  Thu 10th Dec 2020 9:28pm  
Member: Joined Mar 2013  Total posts:704

One morning, Snoz Wyley had been taking a chemistry lesson in the General Science lab, one of the old building rooms. They had evidently been doing an experiment which produced hydrogen sulphide. The overpowering stench of rotten eggs had pervaded the prep room, and was wafting all the way down the corridor to the library, much to the amusement of younger boys. Tringam taught me chemistry for the two compulsory years of the subject, so neither Snoz nor Alfie ever taught me chemistry. But Alfie Crocker took us for general studies, the first lesson in the afternoon of that day. I cannot remember what room we were in, but Alfie had noticed the smell. He did not criticise Snoz by name, but made his feelings known to us, about how it was a stupid experiment that should never be performed in a school laboratory. Well, he was head of chemistry. More recently, I have learned that hydrogen sulphide gas is poisonous (probably not too toxic as I’m still alive and breathing). I daresay elf ‘n safety would preclude such experiments now. Like the thermite reaction that melted steel – we were all gathered round Tringam, and had no PPE whatsoever – not even goggles or dark glasses! And the white light was blindingly bright.
King Henry VIII Grammar School
Earlsdon Kid
Argyll & Bute, Scotland
All posts by this member
1412 of 1420  Thu 10th Dec 2020 11:50pm  
Member: Joined Apr 2017  Total posts:100

Hydrogen Sulfide is a killer! I worked for Aramco in Saudi Arabia for a few years and there were many fatalities as a result of Hydrogen Sulfide leaks! As I understand it; initially your have the smell of "bad eggs" but the sense of smell is quickly overcome and you think the danger is gone. If you continue working in the area concerned you would quickly succumb to the gas and loose consciousness and death occurs soon afterwards. If you smell "bad eggs" get out of the area immediately, this was a golden rule for employees in Aramco! On a lighter note I used a pocket watch at school, because wristwatches stopped working when I wore them for a few days (I mentioned the "Geller Effect" in another post earlier). Our class had a demonstration of radio-activity with the assistance of a Geiger counter and a Strontium 90 sample ceremoniously kept in a locked cabinet and protected by a heavily lead-lined box. After the class was amazed by the counts obtained from the Strontium 90 sample everyone who had a luminous watch was invited to have a radio-activity count made of their watch as an indication of the level of radio-activity in the luminous paint on the dials (now banned!). Eventually I was persuaded to have my pocket watch tested and the result was substantially higher than the Strontium 90 sample. Unsurprisingly I became a person to avoid for a few days afterwards until the memories of my class-mates dimmed!
King Henry VIII Grammar School
rufford155
Lytham UK and Madeira
All posts by this member
1413 of 1420  Wed 6th Jan 2021 4:58pm  
Member: Joined Nov 2019  Total posts:25

On 4th Oct 2020 7:44am, Woglet said: The only car my father had was his red Skoda. He never had a beetle and wouldn't buy a German car. Funnily enough I have got a red Skoda Yeti now and it’s the most reliable car I have ever owned. I guess someone will say "Like father, like son"
Hi Tom. Isn't Skoda owned by VW now, so 100% German? Cheers, John P.
King Henry VIII Grammar School
Woglet
Woking
All posts by this member
1414 of 1420  Thu 7th Jan 2021 12:34pm  
Member: Joined May 2013  Total posts:11

I said HE wouldn't buy a German Car and in the 1960's Skoda wasn't owned by VW. I bought the Yeti and a Beetle for my wife at the same time. They have the same engine, same instrumentation and share many other components. Skoda was German engineering at a lower price and the Yeti was a perfect replacement for my PT Cruiser. The body was unique to Skoda and not replicated across the VW brands. Interestingly I found out that his father (my grandfather) had a Skoda Landau in the 1920s. Tom
King Henry VIII Grammar School
Slim
Another Coventry kid
All posts by this member
1415 of 1420  Wed 13th Jan 2021 10:36pm  
Member: Joined Mar 2013  Total posts:704

On 26th Sep 2020 10:45pm, Classicist said: To return to the topic of teachers' cars, I am astonished that no one has mentioned the two most prominent cars of my time - Wog Kolisch's red Volkswagen beetle (the same colour as the Oxo tin in which he kept his chalk) and Pope Harris's Ford Popular with the lollipop direction indicators.
There was also the biggest car, Pop Cork's Vanden Plas limousine, we called it. IIRC it was dark red. It used to be parked with two or three other cars in a high priority spot, a recess between the general science lab and room 6, which IIRC was where Bugsy Leachman lived.
King Henry VIII Grammar School
Exilium
Oakville, ON, Canada
All posts by this member
1416 of 1420  Fri 26th Feb 2021 6:02pm  
Member: Joined May 2020  Total posts:8

Kitty Fisher - did a school "swot" on 18th century English history somehow make a tenuous connection regarding behaviour? Edited by Midland Red, 26th Feb 2021 6:36 pm (Link clarified)
King Henry VIII Grammar School
PhilipInCoventry
Holbrooks
All posts by this member
1417 of 1420  Fri 26th Feb 2021 7:39pm  
Moderator: Joined Apr 2010  Total posts:3565

Mr Leachman tutored me for months on end, along with Mr Brotherwood, whilst I was in Paybody hospital having surgery. I'm very grateful to them both.
King Henry VIII Grammar School
Strachmanaman
Europe
All posts by this member
1418 of 1420  Fri 23rd Apr 2021 8:23pm  
Member: Joined Apr 2021  Total posts:1

Hales house. Early to mid 90's here. Just discovered this thread and it has been very interesting reading. What really struck me when I first joined was just how old everyone there was. The fearsome hollow boom of the older boys in The Cage. The headmasters in assembly: I had never seen anyone that old before. I think that they were Mr. James and Mr. Hough. As I remember Hough retired in the early 90s with James becoming headmaster after that. Looking back now, they seemed to represent the end of the era of Britain as a great power, stood up there so proud and dominant. It is somewhat shocking to read about the things that went on in the past. The violence had certainly gone by the time I got there but there was still an unpleasant and bullying atmosphere, I had particularly unpleasant encounters with one history teacher and one economics teacher. I wonder if they are still there, bullying little children. Mr. Skermer seemed to be particularly friendly towards me when I was younger (I was quite an attractive child) but only up until the age of about 14. I never had any problems with him but the rumours were well known by everyone in the early 90s. He was another one who seemed to be astoundingly old, hard to believe that he was only in his early 40s at the time. He was the Head of Mathematics, Head of the First Year and the organiser of the Photography Club. I find myself almost upset by what happened to Terence Vardon, I think he became headmaster in 1995 following James’ retirement. A gentleman and a scholar with maybe some less fortunate interests. He awakened my interest in renaissance art and literature. Dying at 52 seems terribly young nowadays. Tuesday detentions they certainly were in the mid 90's, held in room 10, near The Cage. The one time that I found myself there, it was Miss Rathbone who asked for humorous stories about the other teachers. The Cage was knocked down in the mid 90's and I think it became part of an extended staff room. King's house was indeed abolished in the mid 90s, maybe 1996? It had been decided upon the year before that one of the houses, the house that came last in the annual inter-house competition was to be abolished, which everyone assumed was going to be either White's or Sherwyn's. White's were really the whipping boys, coming last more often than not. King's always seemed to be the traditional powerhouse, always getting all of the best rugby players for example. Everyone was surprised to see King's come last that year and be abolished. Good to see “Fred” Dunn get a mention. By the end, he had built a reputation as a bit of an Arthur Daley character. At one point, one of the Chinese students got their talking dictionary to say “Arthur Daley is a very dodgy dealer” in one of the lessons. He took great enjoyment in the role, at one point saying that he would accept orders for the mathematics books he was selling at his villa. I think he retired in 1997. GPC Courtois was still there in the mid 90s, as a rugby and sports master and occasional English teacher. The school continued its excellent record in sports, turning out England rugby international Andy Goode and 15 year professional Jim Grindall from the 1991 intake, and England U-21 football international Peter Whittingham with more than 15 years as a professional footballer from the 1996 (?) intake. I have just read that he died last year at the age of 35. In one assembly, they invited former Coventry City player David Busst up to speak, maybe a year or two after his horrific injury, probably the worst in Premier League history. I seem to remember he was still on crutches then. There was also Nick Donovan who captained England schoolboys at basketball before having his career wrecked by injury. One of the maths teachers who joined in the early 90s was John G Cooper who I think played chess for England and was an International Master. Someone wrote down Mr. Humphries. He would be terribly angry about that, Mr. Humphrey it is. I still remember him driving around one of the school teams in one of the old minibuses. It really was a very old minibus, with long bench seats running down the length of bus. And no seatbelts. I am sure that you can imagine what happened as the minibus accelerated or decelerated for a traffic light. Groups of boys would fling themselves as hard as they could to one end of the bus or the other, tremendous fun. Unfortunately those buses were disposed of very soon afterwards. Amazing that no one got seriously injured now looking back on it. Boys bounce very well at the age of 11 it seems.
King Henry VIII Grammar School
Helen F
Warrington
All posts by this member
1419 of 1420  Sat 24th Apr 2021 12:57pm  
Moderator: Joined Mar 2013  Total posts:2523

Hi Strachmanaman, welcome to the forum Wave
King Henry VIII Grammar School
PhilipInCoventry
Holbrooks
All posts by this member
1420 of 1420  Sun 25th Apr 2021 9:26am  
Moderator: Joined Apr 2010  Total posts:3565

On 23rd Apr 2021 8:23pm, Strachmanaman said: Hales house. Early to mid 90's here. Just discovered this thread and it has been very interesting reading...... Groups of boys would fling themselves as hard as they could to one end of the bus or the other, tremendous fun. Unfortunately those buses were disposed of very soon afterwards. Amazing that no one got seriously injured now looking back on it. Boys bounce very well at the age of 11 it seems.
Hi from me too. I was in Sherwyn's, or yellows. He was the school’s first headmaster. Anyway, I was a volunteer PSV driver. During the early eighties, I was driving a Goddess twenty odd seater, which had a massive V8 motor. I was in the far left lane at Swiss Cottage in London with the bus full of youngsters. I needed to turn right, through five lanes of traffic at traffic lights. I warned everyone to HOLD TIGHT. I literally dropped the clutch in first, then with the most rapid gear change into second. We beat everything round. When I looked in the saloon mirror, the welded back door, just as well that it was welded, was simply a sack of bodies. Best wishes to you.
King Henry VIII Grammar School

You need to be signed in to respond to this topic

First pagePrevious page

Displaying 1411 to 1420 of 1420 posts

Page 95 of 95

1 2 3 4 5 .... 10 .... 15 .... 20 .... 25 .... 30 .... 35 .... 40 .... 45 .... 50 .... 55 .... 60 .... 65 .... 70 .... 75 .... 80 .... 85 .... 90 91 92 93 94 95
No actionNo action

Previous (older) topic

St George's Day
|

Next (newer) topic

Our Kaga (The Life and Times of)
View similar topics in the Schools and Education category
 
Home | Forum index | Forum stats | Forum help | Log out | About me | My music
Top of the page
HTML5
1,909,703

Website & counter by Rob Orland © 2021

Load time: 65ms