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Prof
Gloucester
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241 of 248  Wed 26th Sep 2018 12:08pm  
Member: Joined Jul 2014  Total posts:1066

Perhaps the funniest of the Bristol 'l' additions is the poor people whose names ended in 'a' so Barbara(l) Linda(l) Celia(l) Anastasia(l) etc! You can hear it coming and it is hard not to laugh. Tomato(l) is another and of course banana(l) A hoot.
Local dialects and language
Slim
Another Coventry kid
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242 of 248  Wed 26th Sep 2018 1:06pm  
Member: Joined Mar 2013  Total posts:531

A bit like the Brummies or the Black Country folk with their additional m, e.g. "yowm" instead of you, "wim" instead of we etc.
Local dialects and language
Prof
Gloucester
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243 of 248  Wed 26th Sep 2018 1:06pm  
Member: Joined Jul 2014  Total posts:1066

And they must make gravy with Bisto(l)!
Local dialects and language
Prof
Gloucester
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244 of 248  Wed 26th Sep 2018 1:13pm  
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In Gloucester dialect one hears "I sin' er las week" which sounds so much like 'sinner'! "I would have went" is another for "I would like to have gone". "How bist?" might be heard in the Forest of Dean meaning "How are you?" Interesting that "Bist Du" is the familiar form in German of the verb 'to be'. Can there be a connection? "He's my butty" (no not a sandwich, only a friend, viz. buddy perhaps.
Local dialects and language
Kaga simpson
Peacehaven, East Sussex
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245 of 248  Fri 28th Sep 2018 9:23am  
Member: Joined Sep 2014  Total posts:2960

Wall, one morning, 'bout three wiks agoo (t'was of a Saddaday) I was gwine ra-round, by de-pound, and I looks over, and dere was de hog, seemingly 'bout as common, and pensley. I looks round agun, and dere she was all strached and gaspin for breath. So I goos indoors and ses 'Mestress,' I ses, de hog be countable ornary. Wal, 'ses she,' dere ail't no call for yew to come spallin, 'bout my clean ketchin naun de moor for dat,' she ses. 'Ah' ses I, but she be countable bad 'mestress,' I ses,' and I dunno but wat she be gwin to die,' 'Massy pon me,' ses she, gwine to die; Never; surelye,' 'Yew come ra-ound and look at er den, 'I ses. Soon as ever she seen her, she ses to me, she ses, 'Why doant ye give her somthin, 'she ses, 'standin here;' So I got down a gurt bottle of stuff wat I had from de doctor time my leg was so bad, and took it and mixed it ill with some skim-milk and a liddle pollard and giv it her, jes lew warm. But it didn't seem as she was anyways de better for it, and all next she kept on gettin wus, and she died de Monday night as she was took de Saddaday. And it seemed jes a though 'twas to be, for naun as we could give her didn't do her no good whatsundever. Dere was a dunnamany people come and looked . And we had her opened, and master Jones he allowed as she was took wid de information.
Local dialects and language
Slim
Another Coventry kid
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246 of 248  Fri 28th Sep 2018 11:55am  
Member: Joined Mar 2013  Total posts:531

On 26th Sep 2018 1:13pm, Prof said: "How bist?" might be heard in the Forest of Dean meaning "How are you?" Interesting that "Bist Du" is the familiar form in German of the verb 'to be'. Can there be a connection?
Exactly what I thought as I read it; although, for "how are you?", they would normally say "wie gehts dir?" which literally means "how goes it to you?". (Often shortened in conversation to "wie gehts?" or just "gehts?"). The English and German languages have much more in common with each other than we usually realise. Similarly, the Geordies use "gan" for go, "gannin(g)" for going, like the German gegangen (gone).
Local dialects and language
Prof
Gloucester
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247 of 248  Fri 28th Sep 2018 12:49pm  
Member: Joined Jul 2014  Total posts:1066

Yes Slim. we are all familiar with a double Decker bus and Die Decke, as you know, is German for ceiling.
Local dialects and language
Prof
Gloucester
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248 of 248  Fri 28th Sep 2018 10:37pm  
Member: Joined Jul 2014  Total posts:1066

A ship of course is a 'she' but I was puzzled when I first lived there to find a clock is always a 'he' not 'it'! "He's ten minutes fast," (or slow.)
Local dialects and language

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