Topic categories:

Coventry's Markets

You need to be signed in to respond to this topic

First pagePrevious page

Displaying 106 to 113 of 113 posts

Page 8 of 8

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8
No actionNo action
113 posts:
Order:    

Midland Red
Cherwell
All posts by this member
106 of 113  Fri 17th Nov 2017 11:27am  
Moderator: Joined Jan 2010  Total posts:4659

On 16th Nov 2017 7:37pm, Midland Red said: You probably already know that Matterson's have their own thread Thumbs up
On 17th Nov 2017 9:43am, Kaga simpson said: Midland Red, yeh, and I kept putting in MHW and kept getting zero. Thumbs up
Just hit the "own thread" on my post! Thumbs up
Coventry's Markets
NeilsYard
Coventry
All posts by this member
107 of 113  Thu 14th Dec 2017 3:00am  
Member: Joined Aug 2010  Total posts:1630

Another of my favourite long lost tower.
Coventry's Markets
Dreamtime
Perth Western Australia
All posts by this member
108 of 113  Thu 14th Dec 2017 9:22am  
Member: Joined Jan 2010  Total posts:2917

Oh, Neil, not Dolcis as well! Roll eyes
Coventry's Markets
Kaga simpson
Peacehaven, East Sussex
All posts by this member
109 of 113  Sun 31st Dec 2017 10:24am  
Member: Joined Sep 2014  Total posts:1899

Neils yard, I believe it was a 'special' Clock in the market tower, and a special tower was built for it, built by some of Coventry's finest brickwork craftsmen, possibly from a local Kiln. Maybe it was built to withstand small earth tremors, (there were many during the 19th century) that helped it to survive? Somewhere there must be a book or records of it being built.?
Coventry's Markets
Annewiggy
Tamworth
All posts by this member
110 of 113  Sun 31st Dec 2017 12:35pm  
Member: Joined Jan 2013  Total posts:1079

From the Coventry Evening Telegraph 1938. I have copied this in its entirety as it is an interesting article.
Coventry Market Hall Clock Will Famous Timepiece Maintain Its Reputation? Coventry's famous timepiece, the Market Hall Clock, which, for a period of forty years when watch-making was one of the staple industries of the city, was so free from time error that it could be used to time thousands of chronometers that went from the city to the ends of the earth, is now recording the hours once more after being still for a week. After several temporary stoppages during the past few months a mechanical fault put the clock out of action, and true Coventrians will learn with pleasure that the clock, like the watches their forefathers produced, has stood the test of time, and is now expected to maintain its reputation for accuracy. Mr Sam Corbett, the octogenarian custodian of the clock, who has been nursing it tenderly through its past six months of sporadic ailment was called in to make an examination. He advised specialist opinion, an expert arrived from Derby, and the clock is now undergoing a general overhaul, its first for many years. Not that Mr Corbett is not himself an expert, most of his long and useful life has been spent in the diagnosis and cure of clock and watch ailments. But the time had come, he considered, when the Market Hall clock, which is nearly as old as he is, must be subject to a second opinion. Its mechanism has been playing odd tricks since last December. Prior to this year, however, the clock's record has been one of efficient and almost unfaltering service since the seventies of last century. It is one of the finest time-pieces in the country, and for many years before the advent of broadcasting was the "master clock" for the whole of the city. The history of the Market Hall clock is as interesting as the life of its maker. Mr Edward Thomas Loseby, a Coventry man, and one of the most eminent horologists of his day. Loseby learned his trade as a watch maker in Coventry, being apprenticed to Messrs Rotherham, the city's famous watchmaking firm, and after being in business with his father in Leicester for some time he moved to Islington where for many years he carried on the trade of a chronometer maker. Mr Loseby later turned his attention to the manufacture and improvement of clocks. He erected several clocks in and around Leicester - notably that in the clock tower - and in 1866 he entered into a competition to make a clock for the tower of the Market Hall that was about to be built. The contract price for the clock was £308 10s, but owing to Mr Loseby's desire to make the clock as perfect as possible it cost him about £600. There was a clause in the contract that the maker was to forfeit £1 for every second it varied over one second a day, which seemed, to say the least, a harsh stipulation. However the clock was duly fashioned and set going for public use in June 1876 and for almost 18 years kept well much perfect time. During a test over 9 months in 1866 the greatest variation on mean daily rate compared with Greenwich amounted to only 0.2 of a second. Since its erection the clock has more than justified the confidence reposed in its maker. "It is questionable whether there is another clock in the kingdom that could show a like performance", wrote Mr J J Farmer in a published account of Mr Loseby's work. In October 1889, a daily time signal from Greenwich was established in Coventry, and a record of comparison between the clock and the signal showed a remarkable closeness. In 32 tests, taken at regular intervals during 20 years, the clock agreed with the one o'clock time signal absolutely for a period of a week or more. "This clock is in a wonderful condition, and considering its age is in excellent condition", state the Derby firm who have undertaken the repairs. They have fitted a new controlling arm and check spring to the main clock movement; have refined the worn bearings and fixed a new gut-weight line. Facts about the clock Tower 100ft high Four six-foot diameter dials, each facing point of compass Figures 9.1/2 in long, minute dots 1.1/2in. Minute hand 2ft 10.1/4 in long. Hour Hand 2ft 0.1/2in long. Bell weighs 10cwts, struck by two 25lbs hammers alternately. Eight day clock
Coventry's Markets
Kaga simpson
Peacehaven, East Sussex
All posts by this member
111 of 113  Sun 31st Dec 2017 12:58pm  
Member: Joined Sep 2014  Total posts:1899

Annewiggy, Brilliant, that I got the tower to suit the clock about face, is no matter, I knew there was something about the clock and the tower were special. Thank you and a special read too. Wow! Thumbs up
Coventry's Markets
NeilsYard
Coventry
All posts by this member
112 of 113  Sun 31st Dec 2017 4:04pm  
Member: Joined Aug 2010  Total posts:1630

Great stuff Anne - I was wondering when the Tower was built Thumbs up
Coventry's Markets
Kaga simpson
Peacehaven, East Sussex
All posts by this member
113 of 113  Tue 9th Jan 2018 3:04pm  
Member: Joined Sep 2014  Total posts:1899

Annewiggy. Re-read your excellent post again, to me for some reason the clock tower was special, maybe something I heard or read when I was a boy. But in all my travels I never saw another like it, except in Italy in the fifties, there nearly every city had a tower, but Coventry did not have scaffolding slits like Italian towers, so was Coventry better built? Many questions, but in those days you could not look through archives. I tried the Telegraph, but could only go back about six months. If they held a competition for a special clock then surely they considered the tower to be something special too. To me the tower held an historic and interesting place in Coventry throughout those years.
Coventry's Markets

You need to be signed in to respond to this topic

First pagePrevious page

Displaying 106 to 113 of 113 posts

Page 8 of 8

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8
No actionNo action

Previous (older) topic

Modelling the city
|

Next (newer) topic

George Barber & Sons (Coventry) Ltd
View similar topics in the Local History and Heritage category
 
Home | Forum index | Forum stats | Forum help | Log out | About me | My music
Top of the page
HTML5
1,436,243
Counter by Rob Orland

This page last updated 17th December 2017  (Load time: 73ms)