Topic categories:

Wartime miscellany

You need to be signed in to respond to this topic

First pagePrevious page

Displaying 106 to 111 of 111 posts

Page 8 of 8

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8
No actionNo action
111 posts:
Order:    

Kaga simpson
Peacehaven, East Sussex
All posts by this member
106 of 111  Sun 23rd May 2021 11:19am  
Member: Joined Sep 2014  Total posts:3411

Manor House Great picture again. Where do you find them?
Wartime miscellany
3Spires
SW Leicestershire
All posts by this member
107 of 111  Sun 23rd May 2021 2:07pm  
Member: Joined Apr 2018  Total posts:93

Conscription: the Second World War Limited conscription of men During the spring of 1939 the deteriorating international situation forced the British government under Neville Chamberlain to consider preparations for a possible war against Nazi Germany. Plans for limited conscription applying to single men aged between 20 and 22 were given parliamentary approval in the Military Training Act in May 1939. This required men to undertake six months' military training, and some 240,000 registered for service. Full conscription of men On the day Britain declared war on Germany, 3 September 1939, Parliament immediately passed a more wide-reaching measure. The National Service (Armed Forces) Act imposed conscription on all males aged between 18 and 41 who had to register for service. Those medically unfit were exempted, as were others in key industries and jobs such as baking, farming, medicine, and engineering. National Service Demobilisation In June 1945 the process began of demobilising the thousands of men and women who had served in the forces during the war. The government had begun preparations for this in 1944 with the Reinstatement in Civil Employment Act which allowed men and women to claim back their old jobs in civvy street, provided their employer was still in business. Continuing commitments There was still an urgent need to keep up high levels of military manpower in parts of the world where Britain had strong ongoing commitments – in Germany, Palestine, and India. The government concluded that these requirements could only be met effectively by continuing National Service in peacetime. This was not, however, popular, especially now that Britain was no longer at war. It was therefore with difficulty that Clement Attlee's Labour government persuaded Parliament in 1947 to pass the National Service Act. National Service in peacetime It came into force in January 1949 and meant that all physically fit males between the ages of 17 and 21 had to serve in one of the armed forces for an 18-month period. They then remained on the reserve list for another four years. During this time they were liable to be called to serve with their units but on no more than three occasions, for 20 days maximum. Students and apprentices were allowed to defer their call-up until they completed their studies or training. Conscientious objectors had to undergo the same tribunal tests as in wartime. After 1945, however, National Service did not extend to women. (Source: UK Parliament) To put the dates above in context: D-Day Landings 6th June 1944 Germany surrendered May 1945 Japan surrendered Sep 1945 (Japanese Emperor surrendered Aug 1945) Edited by member, 24th May 2021 11:46 am
Wartime miscellany
Kaga simpson
Peacehaven, East Sussex
All posts by this member
108 of 111  Mon 24th May 2021 9:39am  
Member: Joined Sep 2014  Total posts:3411

Three Spires, But the farmer could only claim so much labour, according to his farm, so if a farmer had two sons he had to choose who worked on the farm and which son joined the armed forces.
Wartime miscellany
20A-Manor House
Coventry
All posts by this member
109 of 111  Mon 24th May 2021 10:27am  
Member: Joined Apr 2020  Total posts:158

On 23rd May 2021 11:19am, Kaga simpson said: Manor House Great picture again. Where do you find them?
Kaga. Old newspapers.
Wartime miscellany
Kaga simpson
Peacehaven, East Sussex
All posts by this member
110 of 111  Fri 4th Jun 2021 1:15pm  
Member: Joined Sep 2014  Total posts:3411

Soldiers preparing for the 1939 war with weapons, training, strategies of 1914 and trench warfare. In the early part of 1940 the phony war. Charlie Chaplin had made a film called the "Great Dictator', this was a funny film of Hitler strutting about like madman. It went down well with the British, and was loved and adopted by the newsreels, who presented him as such. But Hitler was not like that, he was tall, had a soft, clear voice and convinced the Germans that France and Britain did not want just to beat them, but wanted to anihilate the German race. Meanwhile, the 'never again' and Chamberlain’s ‘peace in our time' were so strong in France they raised subscriptions for Chamberlain to buy him a house and a trout stream. But we were heading for Armageddon, without guns, tanks, etc, for we still had not put rearmament on a wartime footing. There was great unrest and argument in the government, rows went on past midnight. By Jan 1940, the absence of real war was making the rules impossible to enforce, tens of thousands parents were reclaiming their children from evacuation, gas masks were not being carried. Alarmed by the state of things, Ministry sent out thousands of posters. But it was a harsh winter, Coventry had ten feet of snow, blackout injuries leapt, gas and fuel shortages didn't help, and the Thames froze over. Politicians were calling out to Chamberlain 'you’ve missed the bus' and 'in the name of God, go'. But even in May, Lloyd George asked if we could do a deal with Hitler. It is now, almost impossible for me to state the true order that things happened in those days.
Wartime miscellany
Kaga simpson
Peacehaven, East Sussex
All posts by this member
111 of 111  Sun 6th Jun 2021 2:13pm  
Member: Joined Sep 2014  Total posts:3411

This day in history will be remembered for a very long time, and forever with some Coventry families - in 1944 one of the biggest battles of any war. The 8th Battalion of the Parachute Regiment was a Midland unit, 80% of around a thousand men were from the Midlands, and about 20 % from Coventry and its surrounding villages. These were the first men to touch French soil and release the French people back to freedom, but it cost lives. Brooke's Poem If I should die, think only this of me That there's some corner of a foreign field That is for ever England.
Wartime miscellany

You need to be signed in to respond to this topic

First pagePrevious page

Displaying 106 to 111 of 111 posts

Page 8 of 8

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8
No actionNo action

Previous (older) topic

New Cathedral of St Michael
|

Next (newer) topic

Windmill Road School
View similar topics in the Coventry People category
 
Home | Forum index | Forum stats | Forum help | Log out | About me | My music
Top of the page
HTML5
1,926,292

Website & counter by Rob Orland © 2021

Load time: 52ms