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Our Kaga (The Life and Times of)

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Heathite
Coventry
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391 of 406  Wed 31st Mar 2021 11:44am  
Member: Joined Aug 2012  Total posts:692

Hello Kaga. I can't find any results for Simpson butchers in the 1828 directory, or further on. But these relatives may interest you in the images from 1868. Heathite
Our Kaga (The Life and Times of)
Kaga simpson
Peacehaven, East Sussex
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392 of 406  Wed 31st Mar 2021 5:13pm  
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Heathite Hi, thanks. That Charles Smith, baker, Longford, is a new one - wonder if he was before Jones, or someone else?
Our Kaga (The Life and Times of)
Kaga simpson
Peacehaven, East Sussex
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393 of 406  Thu 22nd Apr 2021 2:22pm  
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Helen, Almost two years of my life I spent in some castle or fortress, but in the early months of 1947 I was to spend two months in a castle on the coast of the Mediterranean Sea. It was an imposing structure with two towers, this castle was over a thousand years old - with its battlements it looked very forbidding. Built before the Crusades for the defence of the old port of Jaffa, the views were stunning across the plain in the distance, a range of mountains. The castle, built of granite blocks (like the step Pyramid), was huge, (it would comfortably have had held Coventry's two churches plus the Council House area). Only the doors a couple of centuries old, it stood on the edge of the granite plain, the sandy beach and the sea. The old castle had stood through all the Crusades, a landmark that had seen battles won and lost, a majestic edifice that I was going to enjoy and its history. There had been an archeological dig in the grounds around the castle in the 1920's. In a deep granite bowl they had left artefacts from the dig chained to the granite ledges. But after only 5/6 days in the castle, we had an accident, a rookie soldier had his head blown off by his friend, so we were transferred back to camp. Latrun fort was built around 1930 (Google if interested), another I spent some months in.
Our Kaga (The Life and Times of)
Kaga simpson
Peacehaven, East Sussex
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394 of 406  Sun 25th Apr 2021 11:23am  
Member: Joined Sep 2014  Total posts:3422

When you come to the base of a pyramid, then reality comes to your mind. These blocks of stone were the first sign of the immense size, to touch with the hands and climb gives you an understanding of the enormity of the pyramids, and so was this castle. And time too, no less than the enormity of the building was here. The oldest surviving monument I had ever entered, provided me with distinct pleasure. For over a thousand years, soldiers had lived and died in and around this great fortress, in ancient times. There is no substitute for direct first hand experience of living and soldiering in this castle of imagined horizons, a monument to the vanished but once thriving port over which it proudly presided for so long.
Our Kaga (The Life and Times of)
Helen F
Warrington
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395 of 406  Sun 25th Apr 2021 2:53pm  
Moderator: Joined Mar 2013  Total posts:2534

Many of these massive buildings survived because of the strength of their construction but like you, I think generations were in awe of them because of the sheer size and didn't reduce them to dust. I think the reason Coventry castle vanished was because it was a bit weedy.
Our Kaga (The Life and Times of)
Kaga simpson
Peacehaven, East Sussex
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396 of 406  Fri 21st May 2021 6:41pm  
Member: Joined Sep 2014  Total posts:3422

An incident in the fifties that comes to mind. I was walking through Pool Meadow to catch the coach to the races, when someone in the bus queue called out 'Kaga' and stopped me in my tracks. It was Dottie (Dorothy). She passed her arms round me in a hug. I hadn't seen Dottie in over twelve years. We had lived close to each other since we were born, we had skipped through the meadows, jumped brooks, and climbed small trees together, but her father took her to South Africa when she was about ten. She was well groomed except she had on a large pair of shades, and you could see a real shiner of a black eye underneath. She stepped back. 'My Kaga, how you have grown up'. I was staring at her eye. ‘Don’t you dare say a word’ she uttered. Wow! We started talking about the last twelve years. I said, ‘Look, do you have to catch the bus? Let’s go to a cafe.’ We walked back to the Continental Cafe and sat down, ordered teas. ‘Kaga, not South Africa, Southampton. My father was with the navy’. We started to talk and nothing had changed either of us, we were still the kids of years ago. Soon we were talking and laughing, that had the cafe looking our way. I said, ‘Come on, Dottie, this is Kaga you’re talking to. Why are you hiding those beautiful dark eyes? Tell me you won!’ ‘The rain had been pouring down,’ she began, ‘and I was sweeping the scullery, the rain stopped. I opened the back door and the cat ran in, sopping wet through and leapt onto the sofa. I dropped the broom to shoo her off, trod on the broom, it came up and whacked me in the eye’. I was full of laughter. ‘I sat down on the sofa into the wet patch, I jumped up and my glasses dropped on the floor and I stepped on them’, and she threw her arms up in the air and knocked her tea all over the counter. Now I was doubled up with laughter. The waitress came up, she thought I was laughing at the spilt tea, and tore me off a strip. I said ‘Come on,’ got up, and we left the cafe. I said ‘We’ll go round to my place and make you a nice cup of tea’. Now she was laughing too, but she put the shades back on. In my flat she looked around, I took her raincoat placed it on a coat hanger, turned and exclaimed ‘Now look who has grown up!’ We embraced - and the tea had to wait.
Our Kaga (The Life and Times of)
Kaga simpson
Peacehaven, East Sussex
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397 of 406  Tue 25th May 2021 10:31am  
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Rob, hi! 1936 and I was delivering newspapers morning and evening, in between times I read them. The Mitford sisters were in them most weeks. Six teenage daughters and one son, the family of Lord Redesdale, son of Bertram Mitford, cousins to Winston Churchill. One daughter eloped with Communist leader to the war in Spain, another divorced her husband to live and marry Oswald Mosley in Germany, another went to Germany to admire Hitler, another went to Europe travelling/touring by car. The two sisters then met, went to Hitler’s favourite restaurant to catch a glimpse. He spotted them, blondes with blue eyes, and invited them to lunch, asked about her car travelling and its problems. ‘Ah,’ he said, ‘but the German people would have the sense to take more than one spare tyre'. Not to be outdone, she replied, 'Ah, but they don't have Dunlop tyres'. She came home and ran a farm, the other stayed in Germany. The one that came home ran her sister’s farm, met one Derek Jackson. He being a reckless boy and married, he divorced his wife and married her in 1936. Derek Jackson had three passions - women, science, and horses. His father was one of the founders of the News of the World. Derek and his twin brother inherited a fortune, both won prizes for chemistry. Derek became Professor of Spectroscopy. he also loved fox hunting and horse racing, he rode in the Grand National as an amateur jockey three times. At 22 he wrote a paper on nuclear rotation, atomic physics. When WWII broke out, he worked at a laboratory and was set to work on radar, but a high-ranking officer got Churchill to free him for the air force, then as a radar operator in night fighters. Outstanding interpreter of radar signals, in great demand by pilots. A suitcase fell from his aircraft, he went straight to his instruments, took a radar fix, called the police and they found it exactly were he said. Later he worked on the window system, and the jamming of radio transmissions. He was awarded many medals. But strangely, he formed a great friendship with Oswald Mosley, his brother-in-law, and they looked after the two Mosley boys while their parents were in prison.
Our Kaga (The Life and Times of)
Rob Orland
Historic Coventry
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398 of 406  Tue 25th May 2021 9:01pm  
Webmaster: Joined Jan 2010  Total posts:1478

Fascinating stuff Kaga - Derek Jackson sounds extremely accomplished. As you say, though, how strange that he should make such a friendship with someone like Mosley!
Our Kaga (The Life and Times of)
Kaga simpson
Peacehaven, East Sussex
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399 of 406  Wed 26th May 2021 9:51am  
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Rob, This was the mid-thirties. The Mitford girls were blue blood, top class. Two were high up in the Communist Party ; one was in love with Hitler who acknowledged her and helped her to go to Switzerland, paying for her medical treatment ; one was married to Mosley ; one was married to an English lord ; and one was not really interested in politics, and married Derek Jackson, leading atom and radar scientist. I think one shot herself, yet as kids they looked a happy family, but they kept the newspapers busy. We also had a King dying, a King abdicating, an untrained King taking over, who did not like Churchill, thought more of Chamberlain. Cambridge or Oxford (forget which) student papers said if we went to war with Germany they would not fight for King or country. After the war we found five of them were Russian spies, yet in British intelligence. As a youngster, I read all this - education was not very appealing after this, but the Blitz sorted it out for me - kill or be killed. Either way, I had no option.
Our Kaga (The Life and Times of)
Kaga simpson
Peacehaven, East Sussex
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400 of 406  Wed 2nd Jun 2021 12:26pm  
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The men who had fought in the battle of "Pegasus Bridge" fully expected to enjoy the fraternization and the like after the war, but no, it wasn't to be. They were sent to Palestine to keep Arab and Jew from killing each other in control of the land, then I joined them a few months after. After witnessing an accident, we were returned to camp. A few days later we were moved to Haifa, - here, a great wave of suitcase bombings. The cause had been that a judge had passed a sentence of death on one of the IZL gang (Irgun Zvai Leumi). I was posted to a five storey building, made of immense stone - I believe it was either a lighthouse or lookout place of mediaeval times. It had a spiral stone staircase similar to Coventry Cathedral. The top two floors were the shipping office of the Med, third floor ours, second floor cash office of the bank, ground floor Barclays Bank. Our duty was to search and secure the building from danger. I opened the door of the second floor - despite all my training on the hazards of panic, I felt the rise of fear, a suitcase stood leaning against the wall. I shouted, "Take cover", and blew my whistle to warn the boys above. Too late - a thunderous roar, as I dived behind the stone wall of the staircase. Dust, paint flakes, stone flew across. I held my ears. It seemed just a few minutes, someone was searching my body. His lips moved, and I woke up in hospital. I had minor cuts and bruises, but my ears felt numb. A week later, I heard that the judge and his friend had been kidnapped from his courtroom. Governments around the world became incensed - politicians, UNO all created. The judge was released two days later. Someone had informed the hospital that I had seen the accident in the fortress - a soldier was hit in the head by a bullet from a pistol - now this. They kept me in for about ten days, there was an inquiry why the explosive had passed the sentries, but it was all hushed up and classified.
Our Kaga (The Life and Times of)
belushi
coventry
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401 of 406  Wed 2nd Jun 2021 1:54pm  
Member: Joined Mar 2014  Total posts:168

Good read again Kaga. I wonder how many British soldiers realised that after VE and VJ Days that they'd be policing/fighting for years in other parts of the world?
Our Kaga (The Life and Times of)
Kaga simpson
Peacehaven, East Sussex
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402 of 406  Wed 2nd Jun 2021 5:03pm  
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belushi Very few. The army worked on ‘walls have ears’ - the less that knew, the less could divulge.
Our Kaga (The Life and Times of)
Kaga simpson
Peacehaven, East Sussex
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403 of 406  Wed 2nd Jun 2021 5:03pm  
Member: Joined Sep 2014  Total posts:3422

When I was a small child one of my uncles took me to a house in Warwick Road. This was the prettiest house I had ever seen, the windows all stained glass, much like the Council House before the Blitz - don't think it ever got back to its original glass? The floor was covered in pretty tiles, several murals and symbols that I did not know at the time, later I found out, was Masonic. It did survive the Blitz. It was a Masonic house, can't remember much, but Coventry in the early thirties was full of books on the masons and their symbols, and rumours of secret handshakes, and trousers rolled up. In the Middle East I found a number of symbols and signs that I had seen in books of old Coventry - would loved to have found out more, but the Middle East erupted after 1948. Coventry was a hive of guilds, masons and so forth, that could be traced back to mediaeval times and, I believe, the Middle East. But we only have to see that our own cross was built in a beautiful pyramidical structure, that the Romans and we copied from Egypt.
Our Kaga (The Life and Times of)
Prof
Gloucester
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404 of 406  Wed 2nd Jun 2021 6:45pm  
Member: Joined Jul 2014  Total posts:1538

Interesting Kaga, it sounds as if you were taken to the Coventry Masonic Lodge, the centre for the Masons' meetings!
Our Kaga (The Life and Times of)
Kaga simpson
Peacehaven, East Sussex
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405 of 406  Thu 10th Jun 2021 3:25pm  
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When I was a small boy, we boys slept three to a bed, that had iron railings top and bottom. My sisters did the same in a smaller room. The side bars were metal also, they had a small metal piece that slotted into the rail in a groove that was a mesh base that spread all over, and the large mattress on top of that - we could bounce on it and have pillow fights that got us a clout round the head by mother. Under the bed was the potty that we dipped our toes in when we had chilblains. The toilet was right down the garden - if my sisters needed to go in the evening, then one of us had to take the torch and stand outside, but first we had to see there were no spiders or beetles around. It was hard to understand why my parents had to light the gaslight at night and the gas lamps outside just came on. Our house had two up, two down - we lived in the front room, the back room was the kitchen and bathroom in the summer. In the winter we brought the tin bath in front of the fire in the front room. At about four I joined my sister and brother at school, school being one room and a coke stove, the desks in rows. The elder kids were on the right going down to the smallest on the left. In winter the desks were arranged in a circle around the stove. We also attended Sunday School one night a week, where we were read bible stories from "Old Pop Barnes" who looked like a monk. There were words like Marmite, Carmelite, Bakelite that were hard to understand. We lived in our front room, but my uncle only used his on Sundays - you had to pass his front door, past three houses then down an entry to get round the back. It was all confusing to a small boy. The street lamps only cast a light around them, then you passed through the dark to the next one. But my younger small sister didn't run about like other kids and then one day she was gone - the horses and hearse took her away, put her in a deep hole. People told me she had gone to heaven, the Lord had taken her. I cried, and doubts and anger came in - she was my sister, why did this guy want her? It was so hard to understand. Often I would be taken in to Coventry - here were narrow cobbled streets, the old loom houses. It had altered little from Victorian days, street stalls with gingerbread shops, sweet shops, pie shops, and scores of bookstalls and shops - we could browse through pictures of foreign countries, the Crusades, knights in shining armour. Exciting, and yes, there were pictures of the Coventry Cross in these old books of Coventry. The older I became, the more I wanted to see. I would pass through the churchyard - on one side, railings and old houses, Priory Row, narrow and cobbled, old derelict houses, a graveyard and great spires. Had the knights really ridden here? The more I saw the more I read, and the more I wanted to be in their life. And you could see the three spires from a long way off. I got uncles, or anyone, to take me to Kenilworth or Warwick to see the remains of these great places. At 18 I was told I would be going to the Holy Land - guys moaned, I jumped for joy. A dream beyond my wildest dreams, a great extension from Coventry beginning.
Our Kaga (The Life and Times of)

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