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Our Kaga (The Life and Times of)

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Kaga simpson
Peacehaven, East Sussex
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376 of 397  Mon 2nd Nov 2020 12:49pm  
Member: Joined Sep 2014  Total posts:3790

Mick Strong, it is now my backyard, I’ve run it 22 hours, walked it several times, and hope people enjoy it as much as I did.
Our Kaga (The Life and Times of)
Kaga simpson
Peacehaven, East Sussex
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377 of 397  Mon 2nd Nov 2020 2:14pm  
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Beachy Head comes from the French "Beau chef" or fine headland. You will have a panoramic view of Eastbourne, the medieval name being East-bourne with a 12th century church. On the cliff top, you will have the pleasure of walking on one of the last remaining stretches of downland turf with its short grass and miniature wild flowers. The light from the lighthouse can be seen for seven miles and is the only one manned by helicopter. The old Belle Tout light is now a private building. In a 1971 cliff fall, a shaft was exposed with scooped out footholds, thought to be Roman or Neolithic. There is much evidence of Roman works around the area. Climbing the hill takes you to the ancient village of Jevington, the church dates back to Saxon times with noted ancient signs. Climbing the Downs, and past Friston Forest, you climb over the hill with several signs of Bronze Age burials, manors etc. and a stone-aged camp. The great long meadow passes over the head of "The Long Man" carved on the hillside, 226 feet high, the hillside alive with primroses in the spring time. Now we drop down the hillside to the 'Plonk Barn', but first call in the smallest church in England, tended with flowers by no other than Dirk Bogarde as a boy. Sweep down the hill, here stands the Plonk Barn, cross the river and here is the "Cathedral of the South Downs" the French like church in the form of a double cross, the "Old Clergy House" dating from the 14th century and the first item the "National Trust" bought. (anyone interested to hear more)
Our Kaga (The Life and Times of)
PeterB
Mount Nod
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378 of 397  Sun 6th Dec 2020 12:15am  
Member: Joined May 2014  Total posts:344

Somebody on facebook researching family history has come up with some info on Simpsons & Canals. Any relation?

Question

Our Kaga (The Life and Times of)
Kaga simpson
Peacehaven, East Sussex
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379 of 397  Sun 6th Dec 2020 11:56am  
Member: Joined Sep 2014  Total posts:3790

PeterB, Thank you, I had just received the message via my son in Perth, Oz.
Our Kaga (The Life and Times of)
Mick Strong
Coventry
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380 of 397  Sun 13th Dec 2020 8:22am  
Member: Joined Oct 2020  Total posts:381

Kaga. Just been reading my Wickman book about some info MR sent me, and noticed in the people section that a Roger Simpson started work at Wickman as an apprentice in May 1940 aged 14. He wrote the piece for this book when he was 67. The book is written by his daughter Alexia Dudley. Any relation?
Mick Strong

Our Kaga (The Life and Times of)
Kaga simpson
Peacehaven, East Sussex
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381 of 397  Sun 13th Dec 2020 9:07am  
Member: Joined Sep 2014  Total posts:3790

Thanks, Mick Strong, but no, I did not know anyone of that name although I had five uncles, but thanks again, it could have led somewhere.
Our Kaga (The Life and Times of)
Kaga simpson
Peacehaven, East Sussex
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382 of 397  Sun 13th Dec 2020 9:45am  
Member: Joined Sep 2014  Total posts:3790

With so much harsh talk going on, perhaps it might help if I accepted the blame and left it at that, as I have done in the past - makes life easier. I am a very unusual man, or think so. I was born with oodles of luck - when photo-finishes arrived in the fifties, I won a lot more than I lost - that upset people. As a kid I fell out of trees, never broke a bone in my life, fell a thousand feet with 80lb bag of sand strapped to one leg, many times, not a scratch. When the war ended, every field, every common had been used to train forces, most with live ammunition. A lot got left behind, accidents began to happen, so someone had to clean up before they could release to civilians. Plus I had walked through intentional mines on railways, and yes, a bank, where this time I wasn't so lucky, but hardly more than a scratch. Peacetime I would talk with several youths. They signed up for many years with factories (not my scene at all). Me, I would be heading for Cannes beach or a pretty girl to walk the the fields of lavender in the south of France, or maybe Ascot races. That didn't make me very popular. I also had this thing; if I read a book, I wanted to be there, understand what inspired the writer, what it must have been like? WWI, I walked the battlefields. Man in the Iron Mask, sat in his cell wearing cardboard mask. Lawrence of Arabia, rode a camel at full stretch, swam the channel (swam from Brighton’s West Pier to Palace Pier). D H Lawrence, followed him through Italy. Whatever took my fancy.
Our Kaga (The Life and Times of)
Kaga simpson
Peacehaven, East Sussex
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383 of 397  Mon 14th Dec 2020 12:26pm  
Member: Joined Sep 2014  Total posts:3790

As I feel I’m the last airborne soldier of WWII on this forum, I wonder if some of you guys would like to hear a little. The airborne were a specialist force, but could only operate when the wind allowed and so, near dates, were placed in lock-down, confined to barracks. This meant a minute’s notice night and day, so one slept with every kind of weapon, ammunition etc under his bed, including mines, grenades, and possibly flamethrowers, although they were quickly taken off the menu the day the war ceased. But PIAT ammunition was stored in the end of the huts - it didn't take much to set them off, they’d blow a hole in a tank! In the early days knee length, lace up boots with a strap for a small dirk dagger - only for a short period, felt unnecessary - also a battle smock, long jacket with a small strap that fitted between the legs with a press-stud. Before battle pockets were sewn down, the sleeves to take extra grenades, hand mines etc, inside in the rear tail, a large pocket would be sewn, extra laundry, bandages, inside would be a knife blade in case of capture - all manner of things. A bible was left to the padre. Edited by member, 14th Dec 2020 12:28 pm
Our Kaga (The Life and Times of)
Kaga simpson
Peacehaven, East Sussex
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384 of 397  Wed 16th Dec 2020 11:12am  
Member: Joined Sep 2014  Total posts:3790

Yank meets Brits. Around the end of summer 1942, the small village of Ansty thought they would throw a fete for the Spitfire fund, and at the same invite a few American soldiers that had just arrived. It was a brilliant summer’s morning, the sun shone and Ansty Hall park looked brilliant - the trees, just losing their colour, looked splendid, the stalls spread amongst the trees. It looked set for a great day. The Yanks arrived, officer in jeep, soldiers in two lorries. The officer met the vicar and the party looked around - didn't seem to like anything. The men stood around in small groups, bored - no one had met the ordinary GI Joe, we had seen films only and these were nothing like the film stars we had seen. After about half an hour the Yanks found a clear patch, produced a baseball and bat, and started to play. This wasn't expected at all. The fete was becoming a flop, and we kids were jeering and booing every time they mishit - the vicar and committee came and ticked us off. Then the landlord came and said “Look, kids, I haven't sold one pint of beer. Now, a bottle of pop each, if you stop jeering and start clapping”. So we did. Then someone said “Hey, Reg, why don't you try?” “Not bloody likely, he doesn't bowl, he throws”. “Use my cap, it has a big peak”, another lad said. Well, he asked if he could have a go, he was about twelve years old, and the best cricketer in the school. He picked up the bat by the wrong end, and the yanks whooped. He stood in the crease or whatever, and the pitcher threw a soft one - he stepped forward and met it, gave it a mighty whack, and it sailed right through the trees, and higher it flew, right down to the wall at the bottom, bounced over the wall, across the main road into the ditch, and astonishingly, the Yanks were now all clapping and shaking his hand, and the mood had changed drastically. We played a game of baseball cum rounders, and the Yanks loved every minute. We kids got them to play hoopla, throw darts at playing cards, even bobbin the apple in a wash tub - the day became a marvellous success, and we raised a lot of money. But we found they had all been issued a booklet called 'How to get on with Brits'- it should have been ‘How to hate the Brits'. A few days later the village received a load of fruit, chewing gum, chocolate, sugar etc - they had not liked our cakes, not sweet enough, but yes it was a marvellous day. Sadly, we learned, nearly all were killed at D-Day.
Our Kaga (The Life and Times of)
Kaga simpson
Peacehaven, East Sussex
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385 of 397  Wed 16th Dec 2020 1:44pm  
Member: Joined Sep 2014  Total posts:3790

Living in a small cottage. Old suburban Coventry's unknown hours when the dew sparkles thick in the hazy light, and the trees and the plants come alive to meet the dawn. The house and staircase become a channel of domesticity, where the air hangs thick with kitchen whiffs, and little boys poke a toe out of bed then draw it back again to the warmth of the bed - an open grate fireplace with no money for fuel, for times were hard. Outside the fog rolls up, country shadows of clouds skid across the newly ploughed fields. We meet the organ grinder in the street as we make for the tram. In town the gay shops sporting gay tinsel, stockings, Christmas trees, and cotton wool spread everywhere - the larger stores with bazaars, grottoes, vivid displays of Christmas scenes. An old man in a bowler hat walks by playing carols on a concertina, as it begins to snow, and people hurry from the upstairs of the tram to the dry lower deck. Snow. We catch the tram home, tired - a log fire, mince pies, and a titchy spot of warm port. What a great day when you’re only five.
Our Kaga (The Life and Times of)
Helen F
Warrington
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386 of 397  Wed 16th Dec 2020 3:57pm  
Moderator: Joined Mar 2013  Total posts:2611

Good stories Kaga Thumbs up
Our Kaga (The Life and Times of)
Kaga simpson
Peacehaven, East Sussex
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387 of 397  Thu 24th Dec 2020 10:22am  
Member: Joined Sep 2014  Total posts:3790

“Your horse has just won but will lose the race, and my horse has just lost but will win the race”, I said to the young lady at my side. She looked at me, puzzled, as well she may, and so it turned out, but in the end we both won in both cases. It was some time in the middle fifties and betting was not allowed unless you attended the racecourse or bet by having an account and posting your wager. I had met the young lady only the evening before at a party. She was in a downcast mood, and thought her world had just crashed. She had been made redundant that morning, part of the new Precinct construction. She also thought her holiday in Blackpool she was saving up for had now vanished. So through the evening I coaxed and encouraged her to join me, next day for a day’s trip to Epsom's first spring meeting of that year. I asked her only to bring £2 of her savings and wear stout shoes. I was breaking my own golden rule, not having anyone near me on gambling trips. The girl had been no farther than ‘Brum’ in her life, she would have to ask her father. She had auburn hair and was slightly freckled.
Our Kaga (The Life and Times of)
Kaga simpson
Peacehaven, East Sussex
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388 of 397  Thu 24th Dec 2020 11:43am  
Member: Joined Sep 2014  Total posts:3790

...cont’d Well, she turned up next morning, a beautiful spring morning. I paid Harry and we entered the Red House coach and sat near the front. Some of the regulars were already on and D-Di followed us, and we said a few words, then and moved to the back of the coach. She had taken off her coat and draped it over the seat in front, and she looked everything I wanted her to look. She whispered ‘D-Di?”. I said “Yes, he is the son of the ice-cream family, they don't want him around so they give him money to spend at the races, to keep him from under their feet”. So we settled down to enjoy the journey. The racecourse was packed. We had freshly cooked roast beef sandwiches with all the trimmings, there were fairground attractions, booths, side shows, and gypsy fortune tellers, and we watched the first race from Tattenham Corner, then we moved across the course to the ten bob silver ring to watch the race I was interested in. We walked along the bookies row. I said, “Now, give your two quid to the man on that stool, point to the sign ‘Larkspur’, and say 14 to one, and he will give you a ticket”. She asked what I was backing. I said, “I already have at home but I will have a little on the favourite”.
Our Kaga (The Life and Times of)
Kaga simpson
Peacehaven, East Sussex
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389 of 397  Sat 26th Dec 2020 10:30am  
Member: Joined Sep 2014  Total posts:3790

...cont’d We watched the horses canter down to the start of a six furlong sprint, and I pointed the race colours to her. But this would make history on this old Derby course, for it was to be the first time on the course the judge would have the help of a camera. The horses lined up trying to get the best position, the flag fell and they raced away and into the lead went the favourite on the inside rail. He led the way until the last few yards and then Larkspur came up alongside and leaned on him, pushing him tight into the rail. They flashed over the line together. “Photo” announced the tannoy. The lady at the side of me was jumping for joy and all over me. “C'mon”, I yelled and we raced down to the bookies line. That was when I uttered the first words of this story to her. A few seconds later the number of Larkspur was announced the winner. “Go get your money”. She went and drew her money, all thirty quid, which I found surprising. Now she could afford her holiday. “C'mon”, I said again. The stewards had by now opened the pathway across to the inside of the course, and so we crossed and as we did so the tannoy announced an objection to the winner. “And now I win”, I said. A few minutes later the judges threw Larkspur out, and the favourite got the race, and a howl of protest was going on by the bookmakers and punters. “Why did I get paid?” “Because your horse won the photo, not the race. He should not have paid you out, your bet was before the photo, not on the photo and he hasn't read the rules correct”. And the day wasn't over y-e-t!!
Our Kaga (The Life and Times of)
Heathite
Coventry
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390 of 397  Sat 26th Dec 2020 10:48am  
Member: Joined Aug 2012  Total posts:724

Love it . . are you both going to get paid?
Our Kaga (The Life and Times of)

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