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Old coaching roads

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Malvern
Somerset
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31 of 34  Fri 29th May 2020 3:17pm  
Member: Joined Jun 2016  Total posts:64

Here's an auction announcement from the COVENTRY HERALD 16 May 1828 "BUILDING LAND AT WHITLEY COMMON, NEAR COVENTRY TO BE SOLD BY AUCTION BY THOMAS GRIMES At the KING’S HEAD INN, in COVENTRY, on WEDNESDAY, the 21st day of MAY instant, at Four o’clock in the Afternoon (subject to such conditions as will then be produced); the following Lots of FREEHOLD BUILDING LAND (as now staked out), most eligibly situated, by the sides of the TURNPIKE ROAD at WHITLEY COMMON within one mile of the City of Coventry:- " There then follows a list of 20 Lots of land, and some are described as adjoining the Old Turnpike Road and next the New Road. These became Whitley Village, which was the start of the original London Road Turnpike until the new London Road was built in 1828. In The Coventry Evening Telegraph Property Guide Saturday 24th March 1973 one particular property is up for sale: "DO YOU want to live at two addresses at the same time – also in a house and a bungalow without moving from under one roof?" The property is 213 London Road and 28 Whitley Village and is still there just north of the Whitley Roundabout. The ad goes on to state “It was originally an old toll-house”. I wonder whether the building was constructed like this to catch traffic which tried to avoid the toll on the new road by skirting round on the old road? The property at the Coventry end of Whitley Village was the Hertford Arms which was opened in 1829, but had closed as a licensed premises by 1840. This might have been "the last stop before the toll road"!
Malvern

Local History and Heritage - Old coaching roads
Malvern
Somerset
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32 of 34  Fri 29th May 2020 3:53pm  
Member: Joined Jun 2016  Total posts:64

In 1827 the General Coach Office was situated at The City Hotel, Broadgate, Coventry - There were regular services to London, Holyhead, Shrewsbury, Manchester, Chester, Liverpool, Leicester, Stamford and Norwich, Nottingham, and Birmingham. These included express services and the services had names such as Eclipse, Wonder, Phoenix, Albion, Magnet and Alexander, as well as standard Post Coach and Royal Mail services. Coventry Herald 12th January 1827. As an example the "Phoenix" service was to London calling at Dunchurch, Daventry, Towcester, Stoney Stratford, Redburn, St Alban's and Barnet. A new fast coach departing The City Hotel every morning at half-past seven to the Bull and Mouth Inn, Bull and Mouth Street same day. [At its peak the Bull and Mouth Inn which was situated close to The General Post office in St Martin Le Grand, just up from St Paul's Cathedral, had 51 coaches and stabling for 700 horses] In 1838 there were local coaches to Leamington, Warwick, and Stratford departing from The Craven Arms Hotel in High Street. The London and Birmingham Railway was built in 1836 and Coach travel started to dwindle through the latter part of the 19th century. Edited by member, 29th May 2020 3:55 pm
Malvern

Local History and Heritage - Old coaching roads
Kaga simpson
Peacehaven, East Sussex
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33 of 34  Fri 29th May 2020 4:08pm  
Member: Joined Sep 2014  Total posts:3744

We seemed to have galloped on from outside the Craven (picture 17 on topic M.P office) the coachman and guard seem to be in their places, the man in front of horses would have been, the coach-office clerk from the Craven in large heavy buttoned overcoat, caped round the neck, gloves and top hat, his overcoat creased from sitting down in the office. He would have checked tickets, the horses groomed, hooves polished. The picture tells us It wasn't travelling far, the guard generally a nimble man, doesn't seem to have a horn to play a good tune on. He would answer enquiries, take fees, attend to parcels, it was the guards duty to utter the magic word 'Right' only then did the coachman sing out ' Loose their heads' to hostler or stable boy and the coach would move on. Once there were 'toll gates' art the end of Much park st, and Barras-lane but they were later moved to Ryton and Allesley In 1872 Toll gates were abolished and became things of the past, the expense of the roads falling upon the local rates.
Local History and Heritage - Old coaching roads
Helen F
Warrington
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34 of 34  Sun 30th Aug 2020 2:49pm  
Moderator: Joined Mar 2013  Total posts:2327

Report on the Road from London, by Coventry to Holyhead. From June 1820.
Local History and Heritage - Old coaching roads

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