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Coventry's Co-operative Societies

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NeilsYard
Coventry
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181 of 195  Tue 26th Jun 2018 9:26pm  
Member: Joined Aug 2010  Total posts:2201

No problem Prof - again these are Rob's images which you can find in the 'Library Pictures' section - the blue button on the left side of the screen. Here's another further up Smithford Street looking the other way towards The City Arms.
Industry, Business and Work - Coventry's Co-operative Societies
Prof
Gloucester
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182 of 195  Fri 19th Oct 2018 7:32pm  
Member: Joined Jul 2014  Total posts:1080

Sarah Williams Edited by member, 19th Oct 2018 7:34 pm
Industry, Business and Work - Coventry's Co-operative Societies
Prof
Gloucester
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183 of 195  Sat 3rd Nov 2018 7:51pm  
Member: Joined Jul 2014  Total posts:1080

Industry, Business and Work - Coventry's Co-operative Societies
LongfordLad
Toronto
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184 of 195  Wed 14th Nov 2018 12:11am  
Member: Joined Jun 2012  Total posts:196

My mother was a member of the Lockhurst Lane society. Her number was 3856. When I lived in Yorkshire for a short time in the 1970s (working for a Canadian company in Manchester) my telephone number was 3856 (just happenstance) my current cell phone (seven numbers) ends (my choice) with the same four digits.
Industry, Business and Work - Coventry's Co-operative Societies
Garlands Joke Shop
Coventry
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185 of 195  Sat 9th Feb 2019 5:36pm  
Member: Joined Feb 2014  Total posts:224

The old Heart of England Co-op, Corporation Street (Upper Precinct entrance).
Industry, Business and Work - Coventry's Co-operative Societies
Annewiggy
Tamworth
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186 of 195  Sat 9th Feb 2019 5:45pm  
Member: Joined Jan 2013  Total posts:1530

I always found that building most confusing, the link between the Corporation Street building and the Precinct never seemed to fit properly. I think the stairs on the left were the link between the two.
Industry, Business and Work - Coventry's Co-operative Societies
pixrobin
Canley
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187 of 195  Sat 9th Feb 2019 8:27pm  
Member: Joined Mar 2014  Total posts:1109

No, Annewiggy, it was the broad steps on the right that connected the Lower Precinct drapery to the main store. I worked there for 3 months at the end of 1961. The ground floor was haberdashery along with bedclothes and curtains. First floor was ladies underwear and baby clothes, and top floor was ladies fashions. Of course it may have changed after I left.
Industry, Business and Work - Coventry's Co-operative Societies
Annewiggy
Tamworth
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188 of 195  Sat 9th Feb 2019 8:52pm  
Member: Joined Jan 2013  Total posts:1530

Thanks Pixrobin. No, the 60’s is my era. Which floor was the upper level of the Precinct? That would have probably where I mostly entered. I seem to remember that was where the ladies fashions were, that was what I would mostly be shopping for in those days!
Industry, Business and Work - Coventry's Co-operative Societies
Dreamtime
Perth Western Australia
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189 of 195  Sun 10th Feb 2019 7:21am  
Member: Joined Jan 2010  Total posts:3319

Anne, do you remember the 'Jax' store, used to show loads of their blouses in the window? 60's would have been my heyday too. That's if I had enough left over from new shoes.
Industry, Business and Work - Coventry's Co-operative Societies
pixrobin
Canley
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190 of 195  Sun 10th Feb 2019 9:44am  
Member: Joined Mar 2014  Total posts:1109

Anne, from the upper level of the Lower Precinct you would have entered the first floor - the one shown in the photo. I can well see that they may have re-arranged the sales floors in the 1960s to capture the younger fashion market. The first floor had the largest sales area and adjacent to the men's fashion in the main building. Next door to the Co-op at ground floor was Fennell's record shop, while at the upper level was Jackson's Gents Hairdressing.
Industry, Business and Work - Coventry's Co-operative Societies
Annewiggy
Tamworth
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191 of 195  Sun 10th Feb 2019 11:38am  
Member: Joined Jan 2013  Total posts:1530

Dreamtime, no I don’t remember the Jax name but I know there were always fashions in the window on the Precinct level. I used to work down to there, I loved Richards shop and there were one or 2 more down that side, I think one was something like Werffs. If I could not get anything there I would carry on down, a quick look in M&S and then to C&A and the Co-op. There was a nice but a bit more expensive shop down towards Shelton Square on the left, then I would be really desperate and try the Market. If I had not bought anything by then I would go home in a bad mood! Don’t start me on shoes! But I did love shopping in Coventry, much better than Brum, it was all together in one place and I didn’t even consider the history or old buildings then.
Industry, Business and Work - Coventry's Co-operative Societies
Dreamtime
Perth Western Australia
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192 of 195  Sun 10th Feb 2019 6:01pm  
Member: Joined Jan 2010  Total posts:3319

Thanks Anne, the names you mention have come flooding back to me, but confess Alice Middletons would have been my favourite if I wanted that 'something special' item. I was more than happy the way the city centre was then and didn't dream of shopping anywhere else. My good old days Thumbs up
Industry, Business and Work - Coventry's Co-operative Societies
Kaga simpson
Peacehaven, East Sussex
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193 of 195  Mon 11th Feb 2019 1:53pm  
Member: Joined Sep 2014  Total posts:3017

I believe the first Co-op store in Coventry was in Aldermans Green Road, it was also Co-op Street, a dead end street with about dozen terraced houses either side. The top was a large hedge then a small field and then the 'Slough'. The building was single storey that ran about 3/4 house space in Co-op Street, the front of shop was in AGR. On the other corner was a storeroom, a stable and a cart, beyond them was a field the horse used. The cart was same as Prof posted on #182, except it didn't say 'milk'. Inside the building as you entered was a counter on either side, one for bottled and canned food, the other side was the bacon/fats counter. At the rear was the veg, bins of loose tea, etc, plus the staff room/storeroom. Mon/Tue we would leave a notebook with a list, Thu/Fri they would deliver by the pony and cart. Wartime and people had to register with a shop. One year the extra jam-making sugar failed to turn up, so we used our ration sugar, rather than let blackberries rot. We used depth charges (saccharin) in our tea - ugh! Fats meant butter, lard, marg - led to rows, some people wanted all butter, some all lard. Tinned milk caused rows, people wanted it to save their sugar. The government confused things - they allowed jam every four weeks, when the ration book said calendar month. There was an item where you only had to give your name, so people could give their name at many shops. People with money could go to a cafe, a hot meal cost about a shilling, saved the rations. There were many loopholes.
Industry, Business and Work - Coventry's Co-operative Societies
Midland Red
Cherwell
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194 of 195  Tue 19th Feb 2019 2:09pm  
Moderator: Joined Jan 2010  Total posts:5371

On 27th Sep 2016 10:34am, Midland Red said:
On 26th Feb 2015 9:05am, walrus said: The building on the left side of Holmsdale Road was the grocery store, the building on the right hand corner was the emporium which sold clothes, materials, haberdashery, bedding etc. It was also the main office, I went there for my interview. If you look on google you'll see a row of Asian food shops at ground level and a clothing store on the first floor. It was a large store by the standards of the day and was more than simply functional as you can tell by the grand limestone cladding. I've mentioned it elsewhere but the shop had a pneumatic money moving system whereby cash was put in a small cylinder and sent to the cash office. Very busy indeed on divi day.
Just found some photos I took in 2009 which I hadn't processed Oh my
Wow! How different is this view of the Foleshill Road building? Thumbs up Next time I'm in town, I must visit there to get my own photo Big grin
Industry, Business and Work - Coventry's Co-operative Societies
Slim
Another Coventry kid
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195 of 195  Wed 20th Feb 2019 9:24am  
Member: Joined Mar 2013  Total posts:534

On 26th Feb 2015 9:05am, walrus said: ... I've mentioned it elsewhere but the shop had a pneumatic money moving system whereby cash was put in a small cylinder and sent to the cash office. Very busy indeed on divi day.
These pneumatic systems still exist in places. The systems of yore used brass pipes; brass, of course, is a good electrical conductor. In more recent years, the pipes and capsules are made of plastic, which is an electrical insulator. Propelling a plastic capsule through such pipes at speed unwittingly makes a very good generator of static electricity! There were all sorts of problems with people getting nasty shocks. About 12 years ago I observed such a system in Birmingham. I presume they eventually solved the problem by installing discharge mechanisms at strategic points, as per my recommendation. In the early days, plastic had not been invented. Mankind takes two steps forward and one back. Smile
Industry, Business and Work - Coventry's Co-operative Societies

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