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Wartime miscellany

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Hans
Netherlands, Zeeland
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1 of 79  Tue 19th Oct 2010 6:52am  
Member: Joined Oct 2010  Total posts:1

On the 20th of March 1945 a Lancaster crashed near the village of Nieuwdorp in Zeeland, Netherlands. All the crew members were killed. The rear gunner John Edward Taylor (Johnny) RAF(VR) 1869191 came from the Coventry area. He was 19 years old at the time of the crash. Parents: John William and Ada Kate Taylor of Radford, Coventry, UK. Two months ago the engine of the plane (PB677-MG/Q) was recovered and donated to our local WWII museum. I am trying to find relatives of the crew members to find out what happened before this fatal day in March 1945. I've already retrieved 3 out of 7 crew members. The museum is planning to build some sort of monument for the crew members. I hope someone can send us some pictures of Johnny and give us info about him and possibly other members of the crew. Crew: RAAF 62186 FO Bacon, L P, Captain (Pilot) RAF(VR) 1592648 Sgt H McClements, (Flight Engineer) RAF(VR) 1652888 Flt Sgt R R Evans, (Navigator) RAF(VR) 154615 FO Huttlestone, G H (Bomb Aimer) RNZAF 455771 WO P A Tennant, (Wireless Operator) RAF(VR) 2210978 Sgt J A Cornwall, (Mid Upper Gunner) RAF(VR) 1869191 Sgt J E Taylor (Rear Gunner) Thanks in advance
Wartime and the Blitz - Wartime miscellany
Midland Red
Cherwell
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2 of 79  Thu 29th Dec 2011 10:12am  
Moderator: Joined Jan 2010  Total posts:5118

Thumbs up
Wartime and the Blitz - Wartime miscellany
heritage
Bedworth
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3 of 79  Thu 29th Dec 2011 3:44pm  
Member: Joined Sep 2011  Total posts:348

Side of Golden Cross?
Wartime and the Blitz - Wartime miscellany
Midland Red
Cherwell
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4 of 79  Thu 29th Dec 2011 4:20pm  
Moderator: Joined Jan 2010  Total posts:5118

Correct! And it is . . . . . ?
Wartime and the Blitz - Wartime miscellany
TonyS
Coventry
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5 of 79  Thu 29th Dec 2011 8:04pm  
Member: Joined Jan 2011  Total posts:1368

Sorry Cliff, can't make out the text, is it actually information or an advert of some sort?
Wartime and the Blitz - Wartime miscellany
Midland Red
Cherwell
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6 of 79  Thu 29th Dec 2011 8:38pm  
Moderator: Joined Jan 2010  Total posts:5118

I understand they are directions to air-raid shelters in Cow Lane, Little Park Street, Hay Lane (which is where the signs are) - although I think I can make out the name Broadgate as well Does anyone have a clearer indication of what it says and can anyone confirm what the markings were for?
Wartime and the Blitz - Wartime miscellany
K
Somewhere
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7 of 79  Sat 28th Jan 2012 4:32pm  
Member: Joined Nov 2011  Total posts:539

I thought this might be of some interest for discussion. When I was at GEC in the 60s, we had a toolmaker in charge of the lab workshop, who was keen to brag about his pay. I heard him one day telling someone that, during the war, he was able to put in a lot of overtime, and made loads of money, his best week reaching close to £90 wages. I don't know whether he was exaggerating or not, but that much seems more than a bit excessive for the time - or is it? I know there were quite a lot of strikes during the war, and that people who were required to work long hours on rush jobs got very much premium rates, but was £90 p w possible? He also reckoned that he moved job several times; I thought that was rather hard to achieve during the war, especially as he must have been in a reserved occupation? Perhaps someone out there may know more?
Wartime and the Blitz - Wartime miscellany
dutchman
Spon End
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8 of 79  Sat 28th Jan 2012 4:58pm  
Member: Joined Mar 2010  Total posts:2772

I heard similar stories from a very reliable stories. It was more like £40 per week which was still a huge amount at the time. By comparison a pre-war assembly worker at Standard's received a basic wage of £2.50 but in practice was more like £5.00. My source actually named some of the people involved and claimed that is how they could afford to set up businesses of their own after the war. I knew some them personally but am not going to name them here.
Wartime and the Blitz - Wartime miscellany
K
Somewhere
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9 of 79  Sun 29th Jan 2012 3:32pm  
Member: Joined Nov 2011  Total posts:539

Hi Dutchman I would expect that pay went up quite a bit during the war anyway, because I know that a skilled craftsman's basic wage in 1950 was in the region of £12-14 p w, and of course there was a lot of overtime being worked in the early years after the war. Didn't someone say "One man's war is another man's profit" or something like that? Blush I certainly wouldn't expect you to name anyone! The person I knew is unlikely to be alive now - he'd be over 100 - but I still wouldn't name him here. Thanks for the information. Thumbs up
Wartime and the Blitz - Wartime miscellany
shoestring
Rutland
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10 of 79  Sun 29th Jan 2012 3:51pm  
Member: Joined Jan 2012  Total posts:18

My father served in the Navy for the 6yrs of the war, while his elder brother and brother-in-law worked in the Coventry factories and I remember a certain amount of resentment that he came back to find a woman in his old post (working for less pay) and was encouraged to train for another trade at his own expense, while other family members all had houses, cars and could afford holidays!!
Wartime and the Blitz - Wartime miscellany
dutchman
Spon End
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11 of 79  Sun 29th Jan 2012 4:29pm  
Member: Joined Mar 2010  Total posts:2772

Pay for a woman doing war work was about £2.50 per week, which was a lot less than a man but still far more than a woman would have earned in peace time. It wasn't consistent though, women doing 'traditional' women's jobs such as sewing were paid exactly the same as before the war. Servicemen's pay was always low, even for career servicemen. There was subsidised accommodation for men with families but this was withdrawn immediately if there was any change in circumstances.
Wartime and the Blitz - Wartime miscellany
K
Somewhere
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12 of 79  Mon 30th Jan 2012 11:16am  
Member: Joined Nov 2011  Total posts:539

When my brother did National Service 1946-8 the officer whom he drove around told him that he had come up through the ranks, and couldn't really afford to be an officer, with paying mess bills, uniform, etc. He said that it was virtually essential to have independent means to be an officer, even then. An issue that I've heard caused both serious resentment and hardship was that Merchant Navy seamen had their pay stopped the instant a ship was torpedoed - literally. And not only that, but PoWs were encouraged to escape, risking their life; when they did so, their pay too was stopped as soon as they were beyond the wire. It only resumed when they were either recaptured or got back into the forces. As you say, it affected their families. What price loyalty?
Wartime and the Blitz - Wartime miscellany
Annewiggy
Tamworth
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13 of 79  Sun 14th Aug 2016 10:29am  
Member: Joined Jan 2013  Total posts:1780

I was recently looking on the British archive newspaper site for anything about my uncle Eric Linforth, who was my dad's sister's husband. Eric was a Warrant Officer in the RAF and a rear gunner on Wellingtons. Although off duty he was called out on a night raid of Tobruk. His plane got into trouble and they had to bail out. Because he was not due to go out Eric did not have his flying boots on and when he landed he broke his ankle. The rest of the crew managed to walk back to the base but Eric was captured by the Italians and handed over to the Germans. He subsequently spent the rest of the war in Stalag IVB. Searching on the newspaper site I came across this article. I wonder if anyone knows if they managed to do any of the plans they discussed or if any one has any connections with other prisoners of war in Stalag IVB Edited by member, 14th Aug 2016 8:02 pm

Question

Wartime and the Blitz - Wartime miscellany
Kaga simpson
Peacehaven, East Sussex
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14 of 79  Thu 27th Jul 2017 6:06pm  
Member: Joined Sep 2014  Total posts:3565

At the outbreak of war the gov't imposed a ban on the assembly of big crowds at sports events. The West Indies cancelled their tour and went home. First class cricket season stuttered to a close until 1946, brought an end to many celebrated players. Hedley Verity, Yorkshire slow left-arm spinner, in his last game against Sussex, took 7 wickets for nine runs. He died from wounds as a prisoner in Italy in 1943. Denis Compton, outstanding, spent the war abroad but came back to play in the Test Match 1946/7, scoring a century in each innings. The Oval was to be a POW camp (didn't happen) but lines of wooden poles were set in concrete in the ground, took 45,000 rolls of turf to put it right.
Wartime and the Blitz - Wartime miscellany
Kaga simpson
Peacehaven, East Sussex
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15 of 79  Fri 28th Jul 2017 4:23pm  
Member: Joined Sep 2014  Total posts:3565

With the allies planning to invade France in the future, the troops needed realistic training, and in August 1943, ships of the Royal Navy put American troops on Slapton Sands in Devon. The landings went well in fine weather, the G'Is making many friends with the Navy and civilians in the country pubs. But then in November the people of Slapton and surrounding villages received notice from the Admiralty that they had to move furniture, animals, everything, within the next six weeks - no reason was given. That they did not know because there was a tight security cloaking the event. Slapton Sands in Start Bay had a resemblance to Utah Beach in Normandy. 750 from 180 farms and hamlets were ordered out of 9 parishes. But it was the old folk that suffered most, some had never left their homes before. In one of the fields black GIs built a large camp, the first black people Devon had ever seen. Soon the place was awash with Americans, military vehicles growled along the country lanes. Eisenhower considered it essential to accustom the men to the noise and fury of battle. April 44 - the first flotilla of slow moving LSTs set out from Plymouth the night before. The first landing was planned at 7.30 next morning, but right from the start things went seriously wrong. A British cruiser was to lay down a bombardment for thirty minutes, at the same time troops on land were to fire live rounds over their heads. But several of the LSTs were delayed, the officer in charge ordered the whole thing a delay of 1 hr - but some of the LSTs didn't receive the message, and went ashore during the bombardment and were killed by friendly fire. But worse was to follow the next day. Another group left Plymouth that night, should have had two destroyers as escort. One was damaged in a collision, the other was left behind because of bad communication, leaving the LSTs without protection. German E-boats, fast moving craft, were regularly patrolling the Channel, based in Cherbourg - the LSTs were sitting ducks. That night 749 American soldiers and sailors died. Altogether 946 US servicemen died. A lot of them drowned, they had their life jackets on wrongly. Survivors were sworn to secrecy. On land in Devon, the disaster was suppressed for 9 months, then reporters were allowed to visit - they found black US troops clearing the area, but their reports were censored.
Wartime and the Blitz - Wartime miscellany

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