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Kaga simpson
Peacehaven, East Sussex
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61 of 87  Thu 30th Aug 2018 8:58am  
Member: Joined Sep 2014  Total posts:3071

Slim. Yes that was were I wanted to go, Santa Cruz was his battlefield, but in the fifties you had to go by boat, so I had trouble fitting it in, in the end I never went and the museum I longed to see. Back in the nineties I read a better book I must read the book again. I loved these historic heroes, even Bill Speakman VC - in '52, Korea, threw beer bottles when out of ammunition. But thanks for the reply.
Non-Coventry - Favourite Books
Roger T
Torksey
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62 of 87  Thu 30th Aug 2018 1:02pm  
Member: Joined Jul 2019  Total posts:570

Could there have been a sea plane service? I remember sailing past the Canaries on the way back from West Africa and there came a radio report that a famous American actor had just arrived there by sea plane
Non-Coventry - Favourite Books
Kaga simpson
Peacehaven, East Sussex
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63 of 87  Thu 30th Aug 2018 2:15pm  
Member: Joined Sep 2014  Total posts:3071

Roger Turner, I didn't enquire, I suppose it was possible. But in the 90's we were looking for a holiday when I heard one of my brothers had been to Tenerife so we got in touch. He had photo's of the dirty volcanic sands. My wife said "No way!" We went to the Canary Islands instead - hated it, 11 o'clock every morning a strong wind made a sandstorm. Ugh. Because I liked the author Ben Macintyre's 'Zigzag' early this morning, I asked my wife to drop in the library see if they had a book by him. What she brought back was 'Operation Mincemeat' - as soon as I glanced at it I knew that I knew the story, it was called 'The man who never was'. Read the book then saw the film. Ian Fleming helped with the plot during the war, long before he thought up JB.
Non-Coventry - Favourite Books
Kaga simpson
Peacehaven, East Sussex
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64 of 87  Sun 2nd Sep 2018 3:54pm  
Member: Joined Sep 2014  Total posts:3071

In the early fifties I was looking for a book about the German Paratroops landing in Sicily, but found a book about Sicily called 'The man who never was', but a damned good whodunnit. It is a believable type of story, but it had a lot of loose ends. A few years later the film appeared - the same thing, loose ends. This book now reveals the true story and why the loose ends. Great read and the lengths we went to to win the war.
Non-Coventry - Favourite Books
Roger T
Torksey
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65 of 87  Wed 14th Nov 2018 9:56pm  
Member: Joined Jul 2019  Total posts:570

On 29th Aug 2018 9:08am, Kaga simpson said: Roger, I read it way back just after it was printed, it was after Hawaii, I think, after Texas. I lent it to my son who was courting a Jewish girl, he lent it to her and that was the last I saw of it. Yes, all about the different people that built the churches on top of one another. He wrote Texas and the main family and its beginning, they're history books of a type, not many people enjoy them, but I did. Roger, lots of strange coincidences happened to me. I was talking to the girl's mother one day and lots of things came together. I checked some documents at home - turns out, I was on patrol in a Tel Aviv street one night, the very night she was born in that street. Uncanny. She was born and lived in Israel - their greatest shrine is 'The Wailing Wall'. She had no idea there were caves/tunnels underneath it.
The Source. Well Kaga, I girded up my loins and finally finished it, it took about two months, but was well worth it and hopefully, I learned a lot about the origin of the Jews, the origin of their particular religion. As you say it was about churches on top of each other (up to a point) - to expand a bit it was about the archaeological excavation of a man made mountain apparently called "A Tell" and stories were deduced and told about the various layers discovered on top of each other, beginning with caveman 30,000 years before Christ and moving through the various ages as they constructed a town with walls and how each town was destroyed by invasion or fire, eventually going through the Crusades and ending up in 1948 when Britain surrendered the mandate. Isn`t that where you came in Kaga? Anyway, the tale told is how the British thought the Jews were outnumbered 11:1 and so favoured the Arabs and so handed over the keys to the gates, fortresses and public buildings and offered to evacuate the Jews who declined and were determined to stay and hold on to what they considered their land by force. The biggest impression left with me was the horrors inflicted on every age of Jews throughout their ages of their history, and the dreadful slaughter which seemed to accompany every age. No wonder they were so determined to hold on to what they had at this modern age. It was certainly a no holds barred book, but an essential read, even to get half an idea of what is still happening today
Non-Coventry - Favourite Books
Osmiroid
UK
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66 of 87  Wed 14th Nov 2018 11:15pm  
Member: Joined Aug 2013  Total posts:385

I finished the Byzantium trilogy a few days ago. Now reading Count Belisarius by Robert Graves, Folio Society edition.
Non-Coventry - Favourite Books
Kaga simpson
Peacehaven, East Sussex
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67 of 87  Wed 28th Nov 2018 4:17pm  
Member: Joined Sep 2014  Total posts:3071

I watched Mrs Wilson on tele because of her husband's MI6 connections, and if I had met him. Found out he wrote James Bond books before Fleming. Look him up on Google - Alex Wilson, an extraordinary guy, had a extraordinary life, interesting in itself.
Non-Coventry - Favourite Books
Kaga simpson
Peacehaven, East Sussex
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68 of 87  Sun 9th Dec 2018 9:52am  
Member: Joined Sep 2014  Total posts:3071

Posted on Owen Owen topic - Queen Mother's horse Devon Loch. The jockey of that fateful race was Dick Francis who went on to write crime books with a racing theme. Readers Digest (condensed set of volumes on offer in the newspapers) around the 80s landed upon my shelf.
Non-Coventry - Favourite Books
Kaga simpson
Peacehaven, East Sussex
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69 of 87  Mon 17th Dec 2018 9:32am  
Member: Joined Sep 2014  Total posts:3071

Hilaire Belloc was a Member of Parliament around 1900. He wrote a book in 1911, 'The Four Men', a 140 kilometre journey on foot across Sussex from Robertsbridge in the east to Harting in the west. A guy called Bob Potter read it in the thirties, decided to follow his footsteps - the war intervened, he did it in the fifties, but now some of the countryside was roads. He kept to the book as much as possible. He then wrote his book 'Across Sussex with Belloc' - beautiful country villages, scenery, etc. I decided I had to do this walk in stages. I was 71 years of age, 26 Nov 1998. I caught the train to Robertsbridge - this was one of the most beautiful walks one could imagine.
Non-Coventry - Favourite Books
Roger T
Torksey
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70 of 87  Thu 7th Feb 2019 10:43pm  
Member: Joined Jul 2019  Total posts:570

I have just finished a book I received for Christmas. It was a cracker. It was about a Royal Navy ship called "Erebus" and it was written by Michael Palin. Erebus was a small sturdy Bomb Vessel 342 tons, but strong as she was built she was further strengthened for exploration work in Antarctica where she was used to construct observatories to make calculations in connection with the True Magnetic Pole. She operated in tandem with a similar vessel named "Terror" and eventually they both sailed under the overall command of John Franklin to discover The North West Passage. This was ill fated and both vessels and their crew disappeared. Many expeditions were sent to discover their fate, with very little result although some stories told by the native Inuits did begin to throw some light on some of the crew`s endings. The vessels on the other hand remained lost since 1845/6 until comparatively recently when the Erebus was located. The book is not all gloom and doom. There are accounts of good times in Tasmania when they refitted and there is also a time on the Falkland Islands. But the strength of the book is in the telling. Michael Palin must have done endless research and tells a good "yarn" almost recreating the excitement for me anyway of "being there". I thoroughly recommend this book.
Non-Coventry - Favourite Books
Kaga simpson
Peacehaven, East Sussex
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71 of 87  Tue 4th Jun 2019 10:39am  
Member: Joined Sep 2014  Total posts:3071

Roger Turner. On my shopping list, thank you. I read a book about a ship, Henry . . . something, in WWII. Full of mustard gas in a port in Italy, Germans bombed and sank it. A thousand or so Italian civilians were gassed. Britain was the only country to bomb Rome. Michael Portillo's book Hidden History of Britain talks of Shepton Mallet Military Prison, but no word of the small hospital that belonged to it - to me, clouded in some mystery, attached to it that no one talks of, or any one knows about. Hospital vanished without trace. Also read that an SOE agent had a phial of germ warfare on his person but the author could not find out what happened to it or any more details.
Non-Coventry - Favourite Books
mcsporran
Coventry & Cebu
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72 of 87  Tue 4th Jun 2019 1:58pm  
Member: Joined Oct 2013  Total posts:423

The ship would be the John Harvey.
Non-Coventry - Favourite Books
Kaga simpson
Peacehaven, East Sussex
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73 of 87  Mon 10th Jun 2019 10:32am  
Member: Joined Sep 2014  Total posts:3071

Roger Turner. Hanskurt von Bremen was commander of U-boat 764, the most decorated U-boat commander. He wrote a memoir from the boat's log in the eighties, a best seller. But Heinz Guske was one of the crew, and was shocked by the number of false reports in the log. Now a civilian, not under threat from the military, he exposed the commander, and 'fact from fiction'.
Non-Coventry - Favourite Books
Ken Dickson
High Hesket Cumbria
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74 of 87  Mon 10th Jun 2019 5:02pm  
Member: Joined Jan 2015  Total posts:49

Kaga, I would like to know your source for stating that Hans Kurt Von Bremen was the most decorated U-boat commander. I am an ex Royal Navy Submariner with an interest in German U-boats during WWII. I have two volumes of Clay Blair's 'Hitler's U-boat war which give details of all U-boat patrols conducted during WWII. Volume 1 is 'The Hunters 1939-1942' and Volume 2 is 'The Hunted 1942-1945.' Hans Kurt von Bremen 's wartime record is undistinguished. He sank 3 ships for a total tonnage of 2,334 tons. His decorations were; 1940 Minesweeper War badge, 1942 Iron Cross 2nd Class and 1942 Iron Cross 1st Class. I can find no further decorations for him. In contrast, Otto Kretschmer in U99 sank well over 210,000 tons. His decorations were; October 1939 Iron Cross 2nd Class, November 1939 U-boat War Badge (1939), December 1939 Iron Cross 1st Class, August 1940 Knights Cross, November 1940 Knights Cross with Oak Leaves, December 1941 Knights Cross with Oak Leaves and Crossed Swords. He is also rated number 1 in the German list of U-boat Aces.
Non-Coventry - Favourite Books
Kaga simpson
Peacehaven, East Sussex
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75 of 87  Tue 11th Jun 2019 2:23pm  
Member: Joined Sep 2014  Total posts:3071

Ken Dickson, hi. It's a long story, but I'm puzzled by your wanting to know where I got the info' from. It's not important about his medals, it's about the log book. Look - I assume your information is the 2000 era after the book had been 'doctored' or that is what I am trying to find out. Yes I know about HMS Blackwood, Coral, and LCT 1074 and yes that is today's true account, but in 1945 his log book claimed a whole lot more. In 1945 I believe that thirty-three U-boats surrendered in Scotland - heavily censored, no press report, locals told to button their lip. Why so secret -because of reprisals, perhaps? Some time in the fifties a reporter found out, printed an article about the surrender in Scotland, and yes he got the decoration order wrong, but did not mention anything about the log book. I cannot remember the magazine or date. The story of the log book was not brought to light until 1985 when one of the crew disclosed it in his wartime diaries. Now during WWII it was a punishable offence to keep a diary, yet that is what a log book is. So if the crew member is correct, what we have here is a downright 'con' of forty years, over all the European governments and war lords. I find that an incredible story. If the Royal Navy had the log book in 1945 - and yes, they did - why didn't they expose the guy? If one guy did it, how many war stories are fake? Rogers' account of the Erebus' men, doomed to die, and knew it, took me back to a twelve year old boy. 1939, the wireless told us the submarine 'Thetis' was in trouble and could not be rescued, the crew knew they were about to die. Reports that the crew could be heard banging, glued to the wireless, tears in our eyes, and not a damned thing anyone could do - and that reminded me about U-boats and Scotland.
Non-Coventry - Favourite Books

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