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New House, Radford or Keresley

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Helen F
Warrington
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16 of 16  Mon 24th Jun 2019 2:31pm  
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From British History Online Part 1 1332 the priory obtained a licence to empark 436 acres of wood and waste, and added it to its earlier acquisitions to form the manor and park of Whitmore, possibly in imitation of Cheylesmore Park south of the city. A small part of the park lay in Hasilwood and so in Foleshill parish, but the greater part was determined to be several to the priory by the agreement of 1355. It was administered as an independent unit in 1410-11, although still said to be in Radford, but the positions were reversed by 1538-9 when the priory's property in Radford was described as part of Whitmore. There were two houses, those which had been Roger Locard's and Henry Beaufitz's, and a lodge in the park in 1410-11. Although used for hunting much of the land remained arable. The park was elaborately ditched and fenced, but the citizens of Coventry frequently trespassed there in the 15th century. The grange or manor of Whitmore was leased for 21 years by the Crown to Michael Cameswell, possibly a relation of the last prior, in 1539. The reversion was granted to Sir Ralph Sadler in 1547, and he in the same year granted it to John Hales. The rent to the Crown at that time included a payment for the tithes. At his death in 1572 John Hales devised Whitmore to his nephew John Hales, and in 1586 the second John built 'a very fair house' called New House there. New House was sold in the early 17th century to Sir Richard Burnaby. It passed through the hands of a Mr. Cooke, of Sir Christopher Yelverton, who was the owner of it in 1640, and of George Bohun, and by 1730 had descended to Gilbert Clarke, husband of Bohun's daughter, Susan. The house built by John Hales in 1586 was a stone mansion with a long front flanked by polygonal domed turrets. In the centre was a two-storied porch surmounted by a curvilinear gable; there were similar gables to the dormer windows behind a balustraded parapet. At the back of this range an additional wing was built about 1700. The house was demolished in 1778 and another erected on the site; in the early 19th century this was owned and occupied by a Mr. Smith. The manor of Whitmore was retained by the Hales family until 1720, when it was sold to John Montagu, Duke of Montagu. Montagu sold it to Richard Hill in 1722, and it was held by the Hill family until sold by them in 1806; it was later acquired by a Mr. Lee. The principal estate in the middle of the 19th century was that of Edward Phillips, who held Whitmore Hall (possibly the rebuilt New Hall) and 148 acres of land. Other estates in 1846 were those of R. H. Lamb (175 a.), Thomas Sheepshanks (116 a.), and John Hollick (99 a.). Miss Phillips was still living in Whitmore Hall in 1875. The four groups of farm buildings in the park in 1887 correspond with the holdings of Phillips in the north-west, Lamb in the west, Hollick in the east, and Sheepshanks in the north-east. During and immediately after the First World War a number of factories, hostels for factory workers, and a corporation housing estate were built in the east of the park. The largest factory was that of the Dunlop Rim and Wheel Company, on the site of Hollick's farm, which employed 1,400 workers in 1933. In 1950 there were in addition to two Dunlop factories, the factories of the Albion Drop Forgings Company, the Brett Patent Lifter Company, the British Piston Ring Company, Motor Panels, Unbrako, and timber, felt, and upholstery works. The remainder of the park was occupied by housing after the Second World War, notably by Monks Park, a large corporation estate of 335 dwellings which was awarded a housing medal by the Ministry of Housing and Local Government. It consists of two-storied terraced houses built round a series of square greens or closes. Part 2 The other large estate in Keresley in the 1840s was that of T. B. Troughton, with the New House at the extreme south of the hamlet and 203 acres attached to it. The origins of Troughton's estate are obscure, but some evidence suggests that it represents the remains of Coventry Priory's holding. The estate occupied much of the former priory waste in the southern tip of the parish and along Tamworth Road, and covered the area of the field, Netherscotshill, which the priory had had in hand in 1410-11. Part of Troughton's estate, and Lamb's Scotch Hill farm immediately to the north, were the only parts of Keresley on which the tithes were already merged in 1847, an arrangement which may have been made by the priory. When the New House estate was first mentioned in the mid 17th century its occupier was a Mr. Stroud who, as would be natural for the tenant of former priory land, was not among those paying dues to the Cheylesmore court at that time. By the late 19th century the New House had been given the name of the Moat House, apparently through confusion with the farm in Coundon nearby. The Keresley Moat House became the residence of several prominent Coventry citizens, among them P. J. Muntz and Sidney Cash. It was demolished about 1930 when the area was developed for building. So were there two manor houses? There was certainly a manor house and a farm.
New House, Radford or Keresley

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