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Sewall Highway

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mcsporran
Coventry & Cebu
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76 of 83  Thu 26th Mar 2020 9:37am  
Member: Joined Oct 2013  Total posts:474

On 26th Mar 2020 8:38am, slash1 said: . . . Not sure what house number it went up to, must be close to 1000.
Rightmove has data for numbers 2 up to 773. Are there any roads with higher numbers than that in the city?

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Sewall Highway
Midland Red
Cherwell
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77 of 83  Thu 26th Mar 2020 9:39am  
Moderator: Joined Jan 2010  Total posts:5606

Broad Lane goes past 1000, so too does Foleshill Road
Sewall Highway
slash1
northampton
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Thread starter
78 of 83  Sat 25th Apr 2020 3:44pm  
Member: Joined Apr 2011  Total posts:152

Another question about Sewall Highway, and probably a lot more streets around Coventry. Considering the houses where we lived, as I understand it, were built about 1937, there were very few cars about, if any, at that time. Why did we have such large and car width wide back entries? Hard to imagine the thinking, unless of course they just had incredible forethought?

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Sewall Highway
Prof
Gloucester
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79 of 83  Sat 25th Apr 2020 3:48pm  
Member: Joined Jul 2014  Total posts:1536

Coventry geared for change (later on more cars per head of household than anywhere) or perhaps rubbish bin collections, a ten foot would make it faster if two or more workmen. Edited by member, 25th Apr 2020 3:48 pm
Sewall Highway
MisterD-Di
Sutton Coldfield
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80 of 83  Sat 25th Apr 2020 4:48pm  
Member: Joined Sep 2011  Total posts:870

We lived in that area, my parents bought a house in Elgar Road in 1940. The back entries were certainly wide enough for cars. I can remember the council dustcart used to reverse up the entry by our house as the bins were a long way from the road. I am sure coal lorries used to access the houses that way too, since everyone had coal houses at the back of the house.
Sewall Highway
pixrobin
Canley
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81 of 83  Sat 25th Apr 2020 7:28pm  
Member: Joined Mar 2014  Total posts:1103

Not Sewall Highway but a photo I took in Gravel Hill a couple of years back. Planners were caught out by the mass car ownership that started in the 1960s. Many people complain about cars parking partly on the pavement. Even when I have problems getting past them on my mobility scooter I don't complain. If they parked fully on the road there would be insufficient space for emergency vehicles to get through.
Sewall Highway
slash1
northampton
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Thread starter
82 of 83  Sun 26th Apr 2020 8:22am  
Member: Joined Apr 2011  Total posts:152

The dust carts and coal lorries never went down our entries. They would not have got around the corners. That is why one admires dustmen and coalmen from our day. They had to go all the way around the back, the dustman halfway up the garden, the coalman to the top of the garden. They could only carry one sack of coal or one dustbin at a time. Do not recall any complaining.
Sewall Highway
MisterD-Di
Sutton Coldfield
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83 of 83  Sun 26th Apr 2020 2:24pm  
Member: Joined Sep 2011  Total posts:870

You are right, Slash1. They were pretty filthy and physical jobs. There were no binliners then and the bins would be heavy as they were full of ashes from coal fires. As you say, the dustmen had to go up the garden to collect and then return the bins. I remember them wearing a sort of leather shoulder pad to carry the bins. Likewise the coalmen, who would carry the sacks up the garden and empty them into the coalhouse. The lorries would reverse up our entry but I'm sure many others would be too narrow. Ours was T-shaped and it only got as far as the junction, but it saved a lot of time and effort. It is also the case that the lorries were considerably smaller then. As an aside, it was a Coventry by-law that coal lorries had to carry a deadweight scale and two 56lb weights on the back. This made it easier for Weights & Measures staff to check that the bags were properly filled when we stopped them in the street. The by-law came about because the Chief W&M inspector was the son of a prominent local politician and successfully lobbied for it.
Sewall Highway

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