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charabanc
1 of 8  8th Apr 2016 12:33am
Member: Joined Apr 2012   Total posts: 167

Much Park Street (Click to see this topic in full)
Francis William Franklin must have been the one who was buried in February 1916, aged 83.
 
Kaga simpson
2 of 8  7th Apr 2016 4:23pm
Member: Joined Sep 2014   Total posts: 3325

Much Park Street (Click to see this topic in full)
Annewiggy, I know there was a lot of Franklins in Coventry, but a William Franklin built a row of houses down one side of Aldermans Green Road in 38/9, wonder if he was a relation? He was known to have lit a five pound note and then his cigarette with the note in the 'Castle' pub one night when he was drunk, to the disgust of the pub crowd. That bottle car was seen a lot round town at one stage, or was there more than one?
 
Annewiggy
3 of 8  7th Apr 2016 12:19pm
Member: Joined Jan 2013   Total posts: 1642

Much Park Street (Click to see this topic in full)
A little bit more info you might find interesting. The business was originally in Bayley Lane. This is what it says in the 1912 book "Coventry up to date" Messrs Wm. Franklin & Son Ribbon Manufacturers, Bayley Lane, COVENTRY That the once prosperous staple trade of Coventry is by no means in a moribund condition is evidenced by the continued existence of such old and well known firms such as that of Messrs. Wm. Franklin and Son, whise connection with the ribbon-making industry dates back to the first quarter of the century. The founder, Mr Pears, was a well known manufacturer at that time. Mr Franklin, after duly serving his indentures for seven years, and subsequently taking up the freedom of the city, began business on his own account and very shortly Mr Pears, his former employer, solicited him to join the old firm, which then became Pears and Franklin. This arrangement continued until 1856 when Mr. F.W. Franklin was taken into partnership, the title then being altered to Pears, Franklin and Son. Shortly afterwards Mr Pears retired on the grounds of failing health, and the present style of the firm adopted. In January 1885, the present head of the firm, Mr Francis William Franklin, took over the reins of management. The premises occupied by the firm since their erection in 1860 are situated in Bayley Lane near to St. Michaels Church, and consist of a substantial red brick building of four storeys, containing on the ground floor manufacturing offices; the other portions of the warehouse being devoted to the different departments, such as the preparation of materia for the looms, and the finishing of woven fabrics. These include winding, warping, finishing, and watering machines, with pattern looms. The ribbons manufactured are of high class quality, fully up-to-date in colour and design, and are chiefly in demand in the home markets. A numerous staff of hands is employed in the warehouse, the manufacture of the goods being carried on at the weavers' own houses. In 1918, then in Much Park Street they were making medal ribbons to government contract.
 
charabanc
4 of 8  5th Apr 2016 7:54pm
Member: Joined Apr 2012   Total posts: 167

Much Park Street (Click to see this topic in full)
I had occasion, some time ago, to do some research on William Franklin, which you may (or may not) find interesting. William Franklin Born c1809. Married to Mary (possibly nee Dalby), possibly 13th Jan 1832 at St Michael's, Coventry. He was a ribbon manufacturer in Coventry and used a Jacquard loom on his premises which could produce a ribbon with eight colours simultaneously. He was apprenticed to Abijah Pears, ribbon manufacturer (Mayor of Coventry 1842), and became a freeman of the city. He was noted in the local press as a 'sturdy liberal' and each time he came forward for election was called an Undenominationalist. His sisters, the Misses Franklin, owned and ran the private school in Warwick Row which Mary Ann Evans (George Eliot) attended. His father was the Rev'd Francis Franklin, for over half a century Minister at Cow Lane Chapel and nicknamed 'Father Franklin'. He was supposed to be depicted as Rev'd Rufus Lyon in George Eliot's book "Felix Holt". All are buried in London Road Cemetery, behind the Nonconformist Chapel. The Franklins were a force in local Baptist circles for over a century. William was a member of the School Board with responsibility for staffing at Spon Street and South Street. At the 1881 Census they were living at 'Highfield', St Nicholas St., Radford, Coventry with a daughter Sophia, unmarried and aged 40 (she died in 1900 aged 59). This street was home to most of the influential people in the city in mid-Victorian times. Died January 1885 aged 76 (GRO Coventry 6d 323). Buried 9th January at London Road Cemetery – Sq 119 Grave 6. His death was reported in the South Street School log book (page 186) by head teacher Anna Maria Watts on January 5th during the opening entry on the first day of term after the Christmas holiday.– 'W. Franklin Esq're (Member of the Coventry School Board) is dead. The children said the Hymn by Jane Taylor, "The morning hours of cheerful light," that he had asked the mistress to teach them.' A total of 13 people were buried in the family grave – William Parsons Franklin aged 7 16th Jun 1853 Radford Road Kingsford Franklin aged 5 mths 27th Mar 1873 Radford Road Grace Marion Franklin aged 3 20th Jan 1874 Radford Road Andrew Leslie Franklin aged 27 14th Dec 1876 Radford Road William Franklin aged 76 9th Jan 1885 St Nicholas St David Shakespeare Franklin aged 14 days 18th Mar 1885 St Nicholas St Elizabeth Franklin aged 43 10th April 1885 St Nicholas St Mary Franklin aged 82 20th Jun 1889 St Nicholas St Sophia Franklin aged 59 2nd Oct 1900 Highfield Francis William Franklin aged 83 22nd Feb 1916 Samuel Walter Morris aged 79 10th Nov 1937 Mary Elizabeth Morris aged 88 28th Feb 1946 Mary Irene Morris aged 89 25th Feb 1971 Highfield House still stands and is home to a collection of offices of various organisations.
 
Heathite
5 of 8  28th Sep 2015 4:34pm
Member: Joined Aug 2012   Total posts: 637

Lower Ford Street (Click to see this topic in full)
I've also looked at the 1935-6 directory and here's the details for the same houses. Number 103 is William Franklin, 105 is Edward Munns, 107 is Charles Aston, 109 is Albert George Wiltshire, then Godiva Street to the right, 111 is L Williams, grocer, 113 is Joseph Lee Moulton.
 
andamanaffair
6 of 8  3rd Apr 2014 1:57pm
Member: Joined Mar 2014   Total posts: 5

Images of industrial buildings, 1970s (Click to see this topic in full)
Looking at the series of photographs in Covjb35's post, I noted number 31, described as 'industrial buildings in Whitefriars Lane area'. I think I am safe in saying that the main building housed two of the weaving sheds of William Franklins of Much Park Street. I began my working career in 1961 in the uppermost of the two shops. This shot appears to have been taken during the course of their demolition. Edited by member, 3rd Apr 2014 2:11 pm
 
andamanaffair
7 of 8  20th Mar 2014 7:25pm
Member: Joined Mar 2014   Total posts: 5

Much Park Street (Click to see this topic in full)
In searching through the 'net for information upon 'Old Coventry', I came across the photograph at the head of this thread. It is indeed the frontage of William Franklins; I was an apprentice with the firm for five years from 1961. The image of the yard certainly looks familiar. I think it was the yard to Franklins', if only because it appears to be opposite the Greyhound pub. It is as I remember it, although after 53 years, the memory can be unreliable! Questions have been raised as to the apparent discrepancy between the number of floors on the two sides of the frontage. That has left me puzzled too. I cannot recall the precise layout of the frontage but I think it housed the managers' offices on the street side. Nevertheless, I still have many memories of the place, the practices and the people with whom I worked. I still have my original apprenticeship papers. It is hard to credit, in this day and age, that I was employed in such an 'ancient' establishment. Franklins' were good employers but the factory was of Victorian origins -- as was much of the grime and dust within! It was almost as if one worked within a time warp. A couple of years after I started there, they relocated to Northern Ireland, taking me with them. I stayed In Ulster until 1966. They also had a plant at Seymour Road in Nuneaton. I understand that the factory in Banbridge, Co. Down, still operates, although long since under new ownership. I recently learnt that J&J Cash, our big rival of the time, has recently gone into liquidation.
 
charabanc
8 of 8  2nd Jul 2012 9:01am
Member: Joined Apr 2012   Total posts: 167

Radford (Click to see this topic in full)
In Victorian times, St Nicholas Street was THE place to live - the Kenilworth Road of its time. Anyone who was anyone lived there, including Charles Bray, industrialist, newspaper owner, free thinker, friend and mentor of George Eliot (Bray's home was 'Rosehill'), John Sutton, chairman of the School Board and local benefactor who lived at 'Thornbank' and many other illustrious Coventry personalities. The only great house still standing is 'Highfield', once the home of the ribbon manufacturer William Franklin, which now houses offices.
 

 
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